Help please

Discussion in 'Knives & Edged Items' started by 68c15, Dec 1, 2019.

  1. Empty_Holster

    Empty_Holster Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    Last edited: Dec 9, 2019
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  2. tuckerd1

    tuckerd1 Administrator Staff Member Administrator Moderator Supporting Member

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    @68c15 Todd, how did your eBay bid turn out?
     

  3. PRR1957

    PRR1957 Well-Known Member

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    As to Benchmade’s siding with the Left. It was on this forum I learned of their colors.
     
  4. GeneSC

    GeneSC Well-Known Member

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    only thing i know is I usually clean the blade REALLY good then put gun bluing on it and polish it with 0000 steel wool and keep a thin coat of oil on it. The bluing works OK but it's like any carbon steel metal, it will eventually rust if not oiled. The only other solution is stainless steel, but, if you go online and look at the heat treatment, you'll probably do as i do and stay away from stainless You'll probably have to send it to a place that 'heat treats' stainless, and it's not cheap.
     
  5. Kvasir

    Kvasir Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, stainless and a coal fired forge really don't mix well. I'll stick with carbon steel.
     
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  6. Grizzley1

    Grizzley1 Well-Known Member

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    On carbon steels keep the blade clean and dry and lightly oiled. Same as you would with a rifle or pistol.

    If the blade is used for food prep, use a food grade oil like canola cooking oil.

    Most fixed blade carry knives have leather sheaths, if a leather holster is not good for long term storage of a pistol because of it causing rust, I'd imagine the same holds true for a knife.
     
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  7. GeneSC

    GeneSC Well-Known Member

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    Grizzly is correct. long term storage in a leather sheath will cause rust. (I forgot to mention that) for long term storage clean the knife and coat the exposed metal with oil or Vaseline
    wrap with a 'breathable' cloth and put it away.
     
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  8. 68c15

    68c15 TFFWPP President Supporting Member

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    with 4 minutes left the bids went crazy so I bowed out
     
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  9. Grizzley1

    Grizzley1 Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, sometimes the bidding goes crazy at the last minute, sometimes you get lucky and no one else bids. If you really want to try your hand at one keep trying, sooner or later you'll get a blank you like for the price you want to pay. I just set a max bid amount with the attitude that if someone wanted to pay more than that, let them have it. Took me six tries to get the blank in the picture I posted.
     
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  10. GeneSC

    GeneSC Well-Known Member

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  11. GeneSC

    GeneSC Well-Known Member

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  12. ozdude

    ozdude Well-Known Member

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    Having spent thousands on knives, simply because I love knives, I have quite a collection. Buck is among my favorites, have models from vintage to new. Great knives that are relatively easy to sharpen and hold their edge. Then I also have various other well known brands and custom knives with blah blah blah steel etc.
    The knife I use 99% of the time is also my cheapest. Reason: it holds its edge far longer than any other, easiest to sharpen, tough, will take just about anything you throw at it. I actually hardly ever have to sharpen it, a swipe across a steel or porcelain rod is usually all it takes to get it back to razor sharp. It's actually the only knife I need and believe it or not its the one I would choose if I had to toss all the rest. I use it for butchering and in the kitchen, its in continual use. It fills all the criteria you want except for the gut hook. Yep its not fancy and by all means buy nice toys too (I do).
    Green River Sheep Skinner.
    The Dexter Russel with the more ergonomic handle is not full tang.
    Green River.jpg
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2019
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  13. GeneSC

    GeneSC Well-Known Member

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    Interesting looking blade, can you post the dimensions? How do you like the angled blade?
     
  14. ozdude

    ozdude Well-Known Member

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    While the angled blade may look awkward to use, its actually excellent as it keeps your fingers away from what your skinning or cutting, also great when cutting on a board as you can use the entire blade. Likewise while the slightly rounded point may look strange, its actually great as you won't prick yourself and far less chance of nicking gut. No problem with opening cuts in skin due to that, knife is so incredibly sharp it goes in like butter.
    Here's one I'm working on, its getting a fancy pair of canadian curly maple scales.
    Size is just right as a do it all knife.
    130mm Blade, 250mm overall.
    Blade thickness 3.4mm (around 4.2mm on current issue Ka-Bar with coating)
    Although the Ka-Bar is slightly thicker, the Green River is thick enough to easily hack with. In terms of cutting ability and keeping an edge the Green River beats the Ka-Bar by miles. You can easily slice salami thin enough to see through with the Green River, not something that can be done with the Ka-Bar. The reason I'm comparing the two is because if the Green River did not exist and I was stranded on a deserted island I would choose a Ka-Bar. Although the Green River does not look like your typical "survival knife" (hate that term), it certainly fits the bill. Like I said earlier, got lots of knives, certainly all the well known ones among them, so have had the opportunity to evaluate quite a few. In the end to me it comes down to a simple thing, that it cuts, that it stays sharp, that it can be sharpened quickly and easily, and that it won't fall apart or break.
    Green-River02.jpg
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2019
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  15. ozdude

    ozdude Well-Known Member

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    While I would never store any knife, whether stainless steel or carbon in a leather sheath, there is something you can do to a sheath to greatly minimize rusting - soak it in Ballistol, either straight or in a solution with water. Have had carbon steel knives in water soaked sheaths for up to two weeks with no hint of rust with that treatment.
    Here's my grandpa's stainless steel knife that had lived since early 1900's in a leather sheath. When I finally got my hands on it I was shocked and almost cried at the state of it, covered in rust. I did manage to clean it up but you can clearly see the deep pits. Yes granted it was in its sheath forever, but don't think an acidic leather sheath won't eat up your stainless steel knives.
    solingen.jpg
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2019
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