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Discussion Starter #1
I have a Savage 220 22 single shot. I’m looking for any information on the gun. I recently bought the gun after it was appraised for $110. I’ve done some research and have found that it was possibly made before 1947 based on the location of Savage at the time. The barrel is marked Savage Arms Co, Utica, New York, USA. The only number I can find is (700 u) in the receiver area.
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243077
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I looked a little further into into some parts. There is a J under the front grip. Under the butt plate there appears to be some penciled in writing. I can’t read exactly what that says other than possibly 1967 and what appears to be a name. Possibly the person that refinished it if that is the case.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Hammerless version of the Model 94, no markings on the side of the receiver say pre-1947. Info on the barrel only tells you when it was made, as they were interchangeable. here's some info:
I guess I’m just a little confused because nothing mentions it being made in 22 shot. Just 22 hornet. I was able to find posts from almost 10 years ago about another gun exactly like mine. However, at that time they didn’t have any information on it either. Thanks for the source it’ll definitely come in handy.
 

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The gun has been refinished.
Just wondering if you could tell me what gives that away. I’m only 18 and obviously pretty new to collecting guns. We’ve recently had some deaths in the family and I’ve been left trying to figure out the value of some of these guns, out of personal interest and the need to have some insurance on them. Just trying to learn as much as I can. Thanks.
 

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Where is the chambering marked?
I found an old auction of one in .22 Shot

Just wondering if you could tell me what gives that away. I’m only 18 and obviously pretty new to collecting guns. We’ve recently had some deaths in the family and I’ve been left trying to figure out the value of some of these guns, out of personal interest and the need to have some insurance on them. Just trying to learn as much as I can. Thanks.
The color on the receiver. It was originally blued, or color case. When you re-blue a harden receiver, cast receiver, or leave it in the bluing salts too long, it gives it a plumb color.
 

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Discussion Starter #12

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Checked with a buddy that lives and breathes vintage Savage firearms. Said to his knowledge, the chambering was a rare one, and he couldn't find a reference to it being catalogued. He added that there was a period when the gun itself wasn't catalogued by Savage, but they were in production and being sold. One thing I forgot to ask, is if he knew of any made with the .22 Routledge bore.
There was a time period where most of the big manufactures made both, .22 caliber smooth bores, and the .22 Routledge bore. The Routledge bore started from the chamber as a .22cal smooth bore, but gradually opened to what resembled a .410 shotgun at the muzzle. The last couple of decades has seen an upswing in collectability on both, but even more so on the Routledge, sometimes bringing 3-4 times of the same model in .22LR.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Checked with a buddy that lives and breathes vintage Savage firearms. Said to his knowledge, the chambering was a rare one, and he couldn't find a reference to it being catalogued. He added that there was a period when the gun itself wasn't catalogued by Savage, but they were in production and being sold. One thing I forgot to ask, is if he knew of any made with the .22 Routledge bore.
There was a time period where most of the big manufactures made both, .22 caliber smooth bores, and the .22 Routledge bore. The Routledge bore started from the chamber as a .22cal smooth bore, but gradually opened to what resembled a .410 shotgun at the muzzle. The last couple of decades has seen an upswing in collectability on both, but even more so on the Routledge, sometimes bringing 3-4 times of the same model in .22LR.
This one appears have have what you are describing as the Routledge bore. I hadn’t noticed it until last night when I went to clean it for the first time since owning it.
 

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Can you post a pic of the muzzle? I'm pretty sure if it is a Routledge Bore, the barrel has to be marked that way because of the patent rights. If it is, and isn't marked, that might explain it not being catalogued. ;)
 

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Can you post a pic of the muzzle? I'm pretty sure if it is a Routledge Bore, the barrel has to be marked that way because of the patent rights. If it is, and isn't marked, that might explain it not being catalogued. ;)
Yes as soon as I get home I will be sure to upload one.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Can you post a pic of the muzzle? I'm pretty sure if it is a Routledge Bore, the barrel has to be marked that way because of the patent rights. If it is, and isn't marked, that might explain it not being catalogued. ;)
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Trap, what the devil is a Routledge bore, and why would it be tapered from .22 caliber smooth to nearly .410?? To get a wider spread out of a .22 shot shell?
 
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