Help with gun identification

Discussion in 'Curio & Relics Forum' started by The_Patriot2016, Feb 10, 2017.

  1. The_Patriot2016

    The_Patriot2016 Well-Known Member

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    Awhile back I inherited a bunch of weapons from my Grandfather when he passed... most of them i have identified and are fireable. One of them however, still eludes me. Its not in fireable condition, likely never will be, nor do I want it, Im thinking about turning it into a decorative wall piece instead though. My issue is the stock, its missing a metal connecting piece, which may include a hammer, and is broken in one spot. Have played with fixing the stock with some wood putty and stain...but not 100% on that.

    However, if I could find that metal piece/hammer assembly, I could just hide the broken part against the wall, but in order to find a metal plate i kinda need to know what im looking for It has some lettering on it, but most of its pretty well worn off, I can make out Rife, Mass, Patd march 1860. Not even 100% what cal. it is though im leaning 50/70. Anyway, any suggestions/ideas would be appreciated. Again, just going to be a wall-hanger, I dont see this gun ever firing again.

    [​IMG]

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    I can provide more images upon request
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2017
  2. Alpo

    Alpo Well-Known Member

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    I'm thinking Spencer, with the hammer missing.

    Does the trigger guard go down?

    Lemme see the buttplate. Taylor's Armi Sport Spencer, 44 Russian.jpg
     

  3. Grizzley1

    Grizzley1 Well-Known Member

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    It's a Civil War era Spencer that is missing it's lock plate and hammer, it's probably chambered for .56-50 Spencer round.

    Don't mess it up by trying to do a cut and cover repair, do it right or leave it alone. ;)

    spencer-model-1860-lock[1].jpg
     
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  4. Hawg

    Hawg Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, it's a Spencer. Don't muck it up.
     
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  5. The_Patriot2016

    The_Patriot2016 Well-Known Member

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    thanks for all the help guys...yes the trigger gaurd goes down.
    [​IMG]

    heres the butt plate:
    [​IMG]

    and dont worry, you guys are right, no bandaid repairs for the stock...would like to get the hammer replaced. any idea of how to go about finding another one of those?
     
  6. Alpo

    Alpo Well-Known Member

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    I was concentrating so hard on the trigger guard and the knuckle of the hinge, I didn't even notice the magazine tube. Didn't realize wood was missing, and that yellow stripe was not camera glare.

    Talk about your tunnel vision. :oops:

    That's why I wanted to see the butt - make sure there was a hole for loading the mag. o_O
     
  7. Alpo

    Alpo Well-Known Member

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  8. sharps4590

    sharps4590 Well-Known Member

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    Frankly, if the repairs are done properly, I believe that rifle worth the effort. Pretty cool old piece.
     
  9. The_Patriot2016

    The_Patriot2016 Well-Known Member

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    Just out of curiosity, how would one go about repairing that stock and doing it right? I know little to nothing about restorations of this nature
     
  10. Buffalochip

    Buffalochip Well-Known Member

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    When I was in high school, I worked for a man who was a curator at the National History Museum in Wash. D.C. and he was a master at repairing antiques, particularly old firearms. He would find period wood with similar grain, shave the broken areas so they were flat, glue and clamp the new wood and when dry work it down to the original contour, color it to match (mixing linseed oil with burnt umber and red cyan until he got the combination he wanted. The burn umber would give you the dark walnut color, the red cyan for maple) You could always tell it had been repaired, but it was an honest repair that preserved the integrity of the firearm.
     
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