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Discussion Starter #1
Is most of ya all know i work as a machinest. So i got looking in the catalogs the other nite and came up with this idea. I get tired of using the calipers when gagging the case lengths. Thumb gets tired. So for about $60.00 i bought a 6" Granite Comparators Stand and a 1/2" Flat contact point for the indicator and presto! I now can set the indicator at "0" and read the length +or- .005" or set it at the trim length and read "0" to +.010. As all the books that i have show about .010" on the case length. Now i can keep the casses seporated by the .001" and when setting the seating die i will be more consistat in the roll crimp.
 

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Is most of ya all know i work as a machinest. So i got looking in the catalogs the other nite and came up with this idea. I get tired of using the calipers when gagging the case lengths. Thumb gets tired. So for about $60.00 i bought a 6" Granite Comparators Stand and a 1/2" Flat contact point for the indicator and presto! I now can set the indicator at "0" and read the length +or- .005" or set it at the trim length and read "0" to +.010. As all the books that i have show about .010" on the case length. Now i can keep the casses seporated by the .001" and when setting the seating die i will be more consistat in the roll crimp.
If you are talking about checking to see if the cases need to be trimmed I don't gauge every case. I open the caliper to max case length and the cases that go through go in the ready to load bucket and the ones that don't go in the trim bucket.
 

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I got an old Lyman EZ guage for the popular ones. its basically a piece of aluminum with the MAX lengths machines into them. if the case fits it dont get trimmed. if it dont it does..
 

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gun-nut:

I keep my brass separated by lots, usually. A lot to me is brass, no matter the head stamp, that was reloaded together the last time. I randomly grab about five cases from the lot. I size them and check for case length. If any of the chosen test cases are beyond the max case length then the whole of the lot is sized, then trimmed to the manual trim-to length.

Since I only measure five cases initially and only randomly check the trimmed lengths occasionally during trimming, there is no reason for me to make such a setup. No matter what the cases would have measured, they get trimmed to the manual trim-to length.

Now not all trimmers are as accurate as my motorized RCBS trimmer. It will keep the trim-to length within one or two thousands. Hand operated mini-lathes and stupid ones like the LEE one may not be quite as accurate. I even have a motorized RCBS station for chamfering the case mouth, removing the outside burr, and revolving brushes for cleaning the primer pockets and inside the case mouth. To me one of the tasks I used to hate was case trimming. All this motorized trimming makes the task at least acceptable.

When I trim 50BMG cases I have to use my lathe with special tooling I made up as the cases are too big for any normal reloading equipment. I even have to have a special huge press for only 50BMG cases (RCBS).

LDBennett
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I dont disagree with what you all say here. I just thought that this would be a faster and more accurate way of trying something out. I just like to try to take all humman mistake out of the equation, so that i have accurate ammo. I plan to use it more for the rifles. I have a Howa 1500 in .223, and i have found out that just .001" for some odd resaon makes it very in my grouping on the range. I have had it put the 2nd shot in the same hole as the 1st shot. So with this set up i hope to find that happy spot that it likes.
 

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As an ex-machinist, I like your idea/set-up. During production work I've used similar tools to measure machined parts, perhaps tens of thousands of times. Perhaps the other posters don't realize just how easy and accurate it is to use your guage. You could prolly sort 1,000 cases for length in less than an hour...
 

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As an ex-machinist, I like your idea/set-up. During production work I've used similar tools to measure machined parts, perhaps tens of thousands of times. Perhaps the other posters don't realize just how easy and accurate it is to use your guage. You could prolly sort 1,000 cases for length in less than an hour...
I don't see it being any faster that the way JLA or I do it. I do see it maybe being an advantage for the accuracy he is trying to get. I am loading for an AR and wouldn't be able to see that kind of accuracy.
 

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Only cases I really care about the length on is my match ammo. And those get trimmed and annealed each loading regardless of length. All the rest gets passed thru the Lyman gauge just to make sure its below max.
 

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Believe me, using a dial guage with a stand/block/mandrel is way faster than using a "c" style go/no go gauge or a dial caliper locked down. You may not see it, but it's true. I worked with screw machines in the 60s and 70s and one job I ran was hand grenade parts (a small brass "plug" approx. 1/4" x 3/4" with two holes and a "nib" on one end). I made millions of them and prolly checked the parts a thousand times per shift (used a v-block and dial, inspector checked set-up twice per shift). As far as accuracy; prolly don't need to be within +- .003" for cases, but that don't hurt anything...
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks mikld. My problem is that i am a nit picky person and i was just sharing an idea. I am sorry that if i afended some people about an idea. Its just something a bit diffrent and it did not caust an arm and a leg to buy, and to be able to produce more accurate ammo.
 

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Believe me, using a dial guage with a stand/block/mandrel is way faster than using a "c" style go/no go gauge or a dial caliper locked down. You may not see it, but it's true. I worked with screw machines in the 60s and 70s and one job I ran was hand grenade parts (a small brass "plug" approx. 1/4" x 3/4" with two holes and a "nib" on one end). I made millions of them and prolly checked the parts a thousand times per shift (used a v-block and dial, inspector checked set-up twice per shift). As far as accuracy; prolly don't need to be within +- .003" for cases, but that don't hurt anything...
Your right I just don't see it. It takes me 2 to 3 seconda per case and I don't have to read anything. Doesn't matter we all have our own way of doing things and what works for some of us won't work for everybody. If that gets gun-nut where he wants to be then more power to him and great job.
 
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