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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Several months ago I loaded some 38spl light plinking rounds. I had a couple hundred more primed and ready for powder, was thinking about knocking them out and noticed that the primers were not seated all the way in. If I set the straight steel bar on a set of calipers on the top of the primer, it rocks back and forth a little. I cant remember if I seated these primers with my RCBS bench primer tool or if I used a Lee or Lyman hand seater, either way I did not get them down all the way. The two hundred unloaded brass were an easy fix, used a Sinclair hand primer tool to seat them the rest of the way.

Now I have 700 loaded rounds that also have the high primers, tearing these down and re-seating is not something I want to do. They shoot fine out of my revolvers, but I wouldnt want to use them in my lever action rifles. I dont like having rounds in inventory that are not to spec and could be mix up in the future and possibly shot out of the wrong gun.

Opinions on re-seating the primers on live rounds, I did a couple and it does not seem like it would be a big issue. I have read where people have re-done many rounds this way. Have any of you ever done it??
 

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GUNZILLA
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I use the RCBS hand priming tool, I get a sense of feel when you seat them well unlike when I use my Forster Co-ax press.
 

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Several months ago I loaded some 38spl light plinking rounds. I had a couple hundred more primed and ready for powder, was thinking about knocking them out and noticed that the primers were not seated all the way in. If I set the straight steel bar on a set of calipers on the top of the primer, it rocks back and forth a little. I cant remember if I seated these primers with my RCBS bench primer tool or if I used a Lee or Lyman hand seater, either way I did not get them down all the way. The two hundred unloaded brass were an easy fix, used a Sinclair hand primer tool to seat them the rest of the way.

Now I have 700 loaded rounds that also have the high primers, tearing these down and re-seating is not something I want to do. They shoot fine out of my revolvers, but I wouldnt want to use them in my lever action rifles. I dont like having rounds in inventory that are not to spec and could be mix up in the future and possibly shot out of the wrong gun.

Opinions on re-seating the primers on live rounds, I did a couple and it does not seem like it would be a big issue. I have read where people have re-done many rounds this way. Have any of you ever done it??
Several months ago I loaded some 38spl light plinking rounds. I had a couple hundred more primed and ready for powder, was thinking about knocking them out and noticed that the primers were not seated all the way in. If I set the straight steel bar on a set of calipers on the top of the primer, it rocks back and forth a little. I cant remember if I seated these primers with my RCBS bench primer tool or if I used a Lee or Lyman hand seater, either way I did not get them down all the way. The two hundred unloaded brass were an easy fix, used a Sinclair hand primer tool to seat them the rest of the way.

Now I have 700 loaded rounds that also have the high primers, tearing these down and re-seating is not something I want to do. They shoot fine out of my revolvers, but I wouldnt want to use them in my lever action rifles. I dont like having rounds in inventory that are not to spec and could be mix up in the future and possibly shot out of the wrong gun.

Opinions on re-seating the primers on live rounds, I did a couple and it does not seem like it would be a big issue. I have read where people have re-done many rounds this way. Have any of you ever done it??
I have done the re-seat with a hand primer before with know problems, but 700 rounds. Never done that many. Or you hit the range and have a seven hundred round plinking day!!!
 

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I have reseated primers using a Lee priming tool. I don't think you can produce enough pressure with your fingers to hurt the primer. I would not reseat using my bench press.

Nowadays I use a collet bullet puller and no matter how many mistakes I make when loading I take them all apart, re use the bullets and powder and don't worry about the primers. Well, I may be changing my mind considering the price of primers now.
 

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You can put a circular impression in the primer with a hand seating tool....at least I can with my RCBS. I don't believe you're going to set off a round, however. More than one loading manual talks about not crushing the priming pellet when seating the primer so it obviously takes a fairly stiff blow to set one off. I've had to hit one fairly stiffly with a hammer to get them to ignite. The blow has to come over the anvil and with a primer punch it's mostly against the entire base of the primer. Even so, I've seated a lot of primers deeper after I had the case loaded using that tool. Once I started cleaning my primer pockets that little problem became a thing of the past.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the responses, after thinking about it a bit more I think I used my RCBS bench primer to do these. Never had an issue before, think I started and the first few look okay and I went to town on them and never checked the depth again. Maybe at my advanced age :oops: I need to work on my arm strength :p. I do know I dont get the same feel with the bench primer as I do with the hand seaters.

On a side note just bought another 3300 tumbled 1x fired brass and got a little bonus, 150 of them were already primed and ready to load. Doesn't sound like many but at todays inflated prices thats $30 worth of primers and considering that I only paid $100 for the lot I think its a score.
 

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GUNZILLA
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@John6019 I see your point, I like to do my reloading in stages. If I am shooting Monday and Tuesday I start reloading Wednesday. One day for de-priming, cleaning and drying brass, one day for full sizing maybe trim depending on how much brass, trimming the next day, priming, priming the next day while watching tv, and the final stage the following day. Tadaaaa, ready for Monday. I'll spend most an hour or two a day loading. If too busy I just train and practice with 22lr and 22 magnum.
 

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The RCBS hand priming tool has parts in it that can ware out if not kept properly greased. There is a barrel shaped plunger with a concave on each end that actuates with the tools handle. If it’s not periodically cleaned and re-greased, it will ware and cause the primer to not seat deep enough. Disassemble the tool and inspect for ware. If any is found, contact RCBS and they will send replacement parts free. I use a red high pressure tacky grease made by Lucas Oil Products. A can or grease gun tube of it can be purchased at most national brand auto parts stores.
 

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You should be fine, maybe wear gloves and eye protection just for overkill and don’t do it next to anything extremely flammable.
When I worked at a major aerospace weapons manufacturer we had a few 25mm rounds with .5kg projectiles go off on the bench over a few years. They just went foomp and the case spun around a few times.
Without the constriction of a chamber/barrel a live round going off does not build up much pressure or power. Even if you crimped the living crap out of it I doubt you could get a bruise from a round going off on the bench.
Having said that burns or maybe shrapnel from a case bursting might be a greater risk, so long sleeves and gloves and eye protection are a good idea.
Those Hollywood movies where someone throws ammo in a fire and it sounds like the OK Corral at dawn are just that, Hollywood.
Wanna see something fun? Hold my beer…
 
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