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No sir. The 1866 Winchester was made up into the 1890s. Long after the 1873, and the 44/40, came on the scene.

The 1860 Henry and the 1866 Winchester were made of a metal called gunmetal. This is a bronze alloy, and is much stronger than brass. You will find many places where they talk about the brass framed Henrys and the brass framed Winchester yellow boy, but they are wrong. Brass is an alloy of copper and zinc. Bronze is an alloy of copper and tin, and is much stronger. This would explain why all these brass frame copies of cap and ball revolvers shoot loose quickly, while 1860 Henrys and 1866 Winchesters lasted for 50 60 70 years.

Anyway. These bronze frame guns were strong enough for the 44 Henry cartridge, which was loaded with between 25 and 30 grains of black powder. The 44 Winchester centerfire was loaded with 40 grains of black powder. Winchester came up with it when they came up with the 1873 rifle, which with its iron frame was much stronger than the bronze frames of the previous guns, and could take the more powerful cartridge.

There is a very nice discussion about the Henry centerfire, with both when and why it was invented, on this site.

Thank you Alpo.
That was a well thought out and informative reply.
Much appreciated. -b
 
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Alpo always has good pics to show something, that I'd end spending an hour typing trying to explain.
 

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Winchester wasn't going to have the word "Colt" as a caliber marking on their gun. Colt wasn't so picky,
I don't believe Colt marked the word Winchester on their pistols. The original guns were chambered in 45 Colt, and had no caliber marking because they were all the same. When they came out with the 44/40 (AKA 44 Winchester centerfire) loading, they marked the barrel of the gun FRONTIER. I believe the caliber marking simply said 44 caliber.

Many times in novels and books I've seen the Single Action Army referred to as a "Frontier Colt", but technically only the 44 Winchester version is a Frontier.

Marlin also did not want to put the name Winchester on their guns. That's where the name 44/40 came from. That's how Marlin marked the gun. It was not a 44 Winchester, it was a 44/40. :)

Merwin and Hulbert, on t'other hand, said their guns were chambered for the Winchester rifle cartridge. Enlarge the picture and look just below the cylinder.

 

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Marlin also did not want to put the name Winchester on their guns. That's where the name 44/40 came from. That's how Marlin marked the gun. It was not a 44 Winchester, it was a 44/40. :)
That must've been a "thing" with Marlin, because they did the same thing with the Winchester rifle round.
In the Winchester guns, they were marked ".30 WCF", but it was Marlin that tagged them ".30-30" when they chambered them for their rifles.
 

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Marlin is responsible for the name as we all know as the 44-40.

Up through the 1930's there were several different names for the 44-40. 44 Winchester, 44 Marlin and even 44 Remington as can be seen in the 1920 Remington catalogs.
 
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