The Firearms Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,717 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can anyone suggest a good quality sight for those of us unable to afford an EOtech? I've seen several out there but can't tell what is acceptable and what is Chinese junk.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,172 Posts
BSA makes inexpensive red dot sights, from $30, to $180 or so. The $30 one is marketed for airguns and .22s, the higher end ones for shotguns setup for slugs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,470 Posts
Can anyone suggest a good quality sight for those of us unable to afford an EOtech? I've seen several out there but can't tell what is acceptable and what is Chinese junk.
If you want a "Holographic sight" EOTech is the best choice for the money.

Almost ALL of the Chinese ones including the EOTech "clones" are just red dot sights and not all the same thing. The few imports that are holographic aren't known to last or hold zero. As always you get what you pay for.

I paid around $350 after a rebate for an EOTech 512 and it was money well spent. You will pay at least half that much for a chinese one...

A friend bought a Sightmark Ultrashot Holo made in china, it didn't last through the first day at the range. A few hundred shots and it went belly up.

Sorry, I know I didn't give the answer you were looking for.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
635 Posts
I too have bought a few cheaper sights and ended up getting an Eotech. Best money I spent on a sight. I should have a couple more but all I have are 3 junk sights I can't even give away (they won't hold zero). Same answer as above post, no cheap way if you want a good sight.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
41,422 Posts
ROMT, I have to agree with the other folks on this. I paid $200 for a Chinese "clone" EOTech at a gun show. When I got it home and attached to my AR, the damn thing wouldn't work at all. When a friend figured out that there was a loose wire in it and fixed that problem, it did last a few months. After that it kept losing its zero about every other range outing and finally on the last one the zero would change with every shot. I took the battery out of it and left it laying on the shooting bench at my local range, the battery was worth more than the piece of junk.

I sure hated paying for a real EOTech but I found a used XPS2-0 for $300 on a Georgia based "swap" website. I gritted my teeth and paid it but I tell you it was money well spent. I really hated to let go of that much money for a sight but it was worth it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,717 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks guys, I appreciate your honest opinions. $350.00 might be doable, but not much more. Guess I'll have to start saving my pennies.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,066 Posts
There is a nomenclature problem here, I think, or at least one that needs explaining to those new to electronic sights.

RED DOT-There are two types: tube type and open frame type commonly called holographic when it most definitely is not. These use an LED pointed at the back of a front lens element. The coating on that lens reflects the LED image into the eye of the shooter and dot appears to be suspended in space over the view of the target. They typically have no power (1X power). The tube type typically give better sighting accuracy because the LED is typically farther from the front lens element. The pricing varies tremendously from $50 to several hundred dollars. The best one for the least money IMO is the entry level UltraDot for about $150. They are robust, hold all there settings, have variable intensity, and are well made. Many Bullseye shooters use them.

The open frame designs with all the different reticules can suffer poor accuracy as the different reticules are mechanically positioned in front of the LED and the zero might change between the different reticules. In addition, the equivalent sight radius is less than most tube types which also impacts accuracy of sighting.

If you don't pay $150 for a good red dot you may not get a quality that will last.

HOLOGRAPHIC

The true holographic sights use a laser and a laser image forming design to project a reticule into the line of sight of the shooter. The image is a true holograph made with a laser. They can have magnification with accessories. They are very expensive and the common EOTECH is kind of based on the military design that most combat rifles of the USA military use, as I understand it. At one point perhaps 20 years ago Bushnell made one for commercial consumption but it eventually came off the market, to the best of my knowledge. Any Chinese clone is likely to be either less durable than an EOTECH or actually be a red dot made to look like the holographic EOTECH.

LDBennett
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,066 Posts
wv hillbilly:

Apparently they have a main unit that forms the holograph reticule in your field of view as you look through it. Then you can buy an accessory magnifier unit that is I think 3x or 4x.

Both of those options are rather low power but are most certainly enough for most hunting situations (deer sized game) except maybe wide open spaces hunting where the shots have to be in excess of 300 yds. It is possible to hit a deer sized target at 500 yds with as little as 3X but it is not easy.

We used to go to a range that had steel targets every 100 yds or so, smaller than a deer out to 500 yds. My son-in-law was able to regularly hit the 600 yd deer silhouette with open sights on a Mauser K98. With 3x or 4x it would be easier. Extended range shots are really a function of how good the shooter is and not so much the power of the scope but more power just makes it potentially easier.

LDBennett
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
41,422 Posts
I zeroed mine at 100 yards. The "no-name" magnifier I have with mine is a 7 power. I do occasionally shoot mine at 200 or 300 yards but not very good past 100 for me. I have also occasionally shot at the "gong" at the 400 yard line and do hit it - - sometimes.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top