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I have been fighting with a savage 110 .270 for a while now. accuracy is so bad it makes a mosin nagant look sniper quality. I have tried 3 different scopes, 2 different sets of bases (loc-tited), lapped rings, and 4 or 5 different hand loads (proven performers in other guns). I can't even get on paper at 50 yds:eek:


I have looked down the barrel at target and scope matches it at 50yds.

I have also tried loads with none, .030, and .050 free space from bullet tip to rifling.

I have tried it with dirty and clean barrel.

at this point I am down to it being either a bad action or a bent barrel. how do I check these?
 

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I don't know about a bad action, but if you are able to look down the barrel at a fixed point in the distance, it doesn't sound like a bent barrel. I am at a loss to tell you how to fix your problem. All I can say is good luck.
 

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I had an old Remington do the same thing.Have you had a gunsmith check the crown.As soon as I had it redone it shot great
 

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My first question is, where was it at @15 and 25yrds? (if you had the means to shoot it at shorter distances) I'm guessing that you don't have iron sights on it. I would recommend to tear it down, check everything. I'm thinking it's a barrel/receiver mating issue, but there's a whole list of possibilities.
 

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I have been fighting with a savage 110 .270 for a while now. accuracy is so bad it makes a mosin nagant look sniper quality. I have tried 3 different scopes, 2 different sets of bases (loc-tited), lapped rings, and 4 or 5 different hand loads (proven performers in other guns). I can't even get on paper at 50 yds:eek:


I have looked down the barrel at target and scope matches it at 50yds.

I have also tried loads with none, .030, and .050 free space from bullet tip to rifling.

I have tried it with dirty and clean barrel.

at this point I am down to it being either a bad action or a bent barrel. how do I check these?
You don't say where you live, if anywhere near me I would love to have a look at it.
 

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Like Woolley, I would start with a very close range to see how far off the mark you really are. I have had to start at 20' to find "home" with some rifles.

Since the forearm is floated (as per your help me decide thread), the next thing I'd check is the muzzle crown. A very small ding can throw things off quite a ways...

Even with a very slight bend in the barrel you can usually spot it by looking down the bore with the bolt removed. Just like sighting through a scope, your eye tends to "center" your vision looking through the hole. If you're looking muzzle-first, focus on the chamber end and you should see a nice concentric ring. If looking chamber-first, focus on the muzzle end. If it's got a bend in it, you should see the rings looking off center.
Otherwise, a more accurate way to check for a bent barrel is to use a set of v-blocks and a dial indicator gauge. (Not very common tools in a home garage though :() Do you know anyone that works in a machine shop that might have these goodies to rent/borrow/beg?
Rest the barrel on the blocks, one at the muzzle & one at the chamber, and rotate the barrel. Measure with the dial indicator at several points along the length of the barrel to see if there is a bend.

As for action/barrel mating problems, I'm not too familiar with the quirks of the Savage barrel attachment locknut setup, but like any other bolt action the front of the action should be square to the sides. Maybe Josh can shed some light on any idiosyncrasies.
If you've got a v-block setup to check the barrel, you can use it to check if the barrel is squared in the action as well. The Savage is a tubular action so set the muzzle on one block and the rear of the action on the other. Measure at the front of the action or the rear of the barrel to see if there is any wobble.

If I was closer to your end of SD I'd offer to take a look at it too.
 

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Could be a bad crown, but I'd take bindernut and wolleyworm's advice and try MUCH closer - the 15 or 25 yards would be good - to see where your bullets are impacting.

I had a custom '03 years ago that was a real 'tack-driver'. I cleaned it just before a long road trip to go deer hunting. Took it all apart and oiled it up good. When I re-assembled it and packed up, I neglected to properly tighten the trigger guard screws. Accuracy was all over the place until I found my error. Could be something as simple as that.
 

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IMO, 50 yards is too far to bore sight a rifle. 20 yards is a better distance to bore sight from. I typically bore sight at 20 yards. The Savage is a great rifle and I bet you will get it on paper a little closer. Sportsman's bore sights at 20 yards.
 

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I've eyeball boresighted 20 or so rifles in the last two years and every one was on paper (12 inch square) at 100 yards. Are you even getting a group anywhere? Have you put up a big piece of paper and seen where it's going? Or are the impacts all over the place? That's something you didn't clarify.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
well,..... :eek:hmygosh:

I pulled it out of the safe last night after posting to give the crown and barrel a real good look over. while turning rifle around to inspect the bore the scope turned on the front base and nearly fell off. it seems some idiot forgot to tighten the adjusting screws holding the rear ring to the base. :banghead: and during the past couple months the screws took off and went to live with Highboy's range finder :thud:

this would explain why I got a good bore sight but terrible shots. after I find some screws I will update with results. until then feel free to make fun of me and call me names
 

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hope that solves the problem for ya... post back when you get it screwed!
 

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First time I fired my H&R .308 in a silhouette match the scope came off in my hands at the last shot. :eek:

Just in case you were wondering if it ever happens to other people. :D
 

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I use a little green locktite on the mounting screws of my scopes to keep them from loosening. Green allows later removal, but will hold tight until you're ready to take he screw out.

BTW, you're not the only, nor the last person that this will happen to. ;)
 

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you're not alone. I find it better to realize you just forgot something stupid that has an easy fix.

I use the blue loctite on scope screws, have not tried green.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
the screws in question are the windage screws for a leupold type base. that should eliminate a few of you guys and leave me feeling stupid all alone.

can I blame it on HB?
 

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you're not alone. I find it better to realize you just forgot something stupid that has an easy fix.

I use the blue loctite on scope screws, have not tried green.
aa1911 is correct, the right one to use is Loctite "blue". I don't know where I came up with green. I think there is green, but I've never used it. :eek:
 

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blue is medium strenth, red is high strenth, before assembly.

green is after assembly to seal off so you could use both I guess. Never used green myself
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 · (Edited)
last night I emailed Burris and asked them if the windage screws are available and where. I just got home and I got an email from Joshua Lawley offering to send me some. talk about prompt, convenient, friendly service


green loctite is some real nasty stuff. I have used it to permanently secure press fit items (cylinder sleeves).
 
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