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They're talking about rifles, muskets and shotguns. You'll see once you shoot a couple cylinders full through it. Relatively safe? First time you load an unfired percussion revolver how on earth can there be a lingering ember? After that, just use some sense...think. After you fire a cylinder full it's gonna take you a bit to begin loading the cylinder again and any of the mythical lingering embers in a revolver, if you're shooting loose powder and ball, will have long burned themselves out. Unless you're shooting paper cartridges, which are a king sized PITA and not worth the effort as far as I'm concerned, there's nothing to make an ember. This ain't rocket science. Nobody told me spit about percussion revolvers and I never had the first incident. That and there wasn't any internet to screw up common sense.
 

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Discussion Starter #82
Unless you're shooting paper cartridges, which are a king sized PITA and not worth the effort as far as I'm concerned, there's nothing to make an ember.
At first, I was inclined to agree about paper cartridges being a PITA to make. The first several tutorials I watched really over complicated the process. Then I watched one that had to be the simplest thing ever. The guy used large cigarette rolling papers and a dowel just slightly smaller than his projectile. He wrapped the rolling paper around the dowel and projectile, sealed the glue edge and twisted the end of the paper over the top of the projectile. He pulled out the dowel, dumped in his measured powder in the other end and twisted it closed. Snip off the excess twist on each end and maybe add a spot of glue to keep them closed. Done.

I watched that and wondered why anyone would bother cutting up coffee filters, nitrating them, tracing out circles for the bottoms and spending $20 to $30 for cartridge molds.

That and there wasn't any internet to screw up common sense.
Well, that just takes the fun out of everything. :D
 
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Tell me that after you've done a few.
 

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Paper cartridges are fun and cool to remember that was how most people did it way back when . They just bought a couple boxes of 6 bullets . I like to use coffee filters soaked in root killer , it's cheap and last for long time . Coffee filters are a bit thicker and I have a hard time not tearing cig papers when I tried using them . Granted most time I load by hand but will when bored make up a bunch of paper cartridges and use them time to time . I to have seen some in very detail videos on making them but correct are ones were they do the "KISS" method , Keep It Simple Stupid made just for my pea brain and clumbsy fingers !!! More you do it faster you get to .
 

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Reading this has made me want to take my black powder guns out to my range. I have been shooting black powder for some 50 years but it been over a year since I shot them.

A good tip I learned was to pour a few ounces of alcohol down the barrel and let it drip out the nipple to get any oil or moisture out before you load up the 1st time. I hate FTF with a black powder rifle. Its a pain to get the ball out of there. This has all but eliminated this problem for me.
 

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Reading this has made me want to take my black powder guns out to my range. I have been shooting black powder for some 50 years but it been over a year since I shot them.

A good tip I learned was to pour a few ounces of alcohol down the barrel and let it drip out the nipple to get any oil or moisture out before you load up the 1st time. I hate FTF with a black powder rifle. Its a pain to get the ball out of there. This has all but eliminated this problem for me.
I just cap up a rifle and pop a cap or two to blow any oil out of the flash channel and then run a dry patch down bore before loading it up. On my flinter I prime the pan and pour a small charge down bore and touch her off.

My rifles are stored standing upright in the safe so any oil in the bore migrates down to the flash channel. Popping a cap or two before loading gets rid of any oil down there. I also point the muzzle at a blade of grass or a leaf on the ground when I pop a cap to clear the flash channel, the grass or leaf will move to verify that the nipple and flash channel are clear.
 

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Discussion Starter #87
Gratuitous “pics or it didn’t happen” photo. I am honestly in awe of this monster.

5B7D9B8E-61DA-4DD0-B783-C37BF8640BE6.jpeg
 

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Not yet, he ain't inhaled any smoke, that makes it official and permanent. He does have a good start though!!

I'm not sure that's how "most" did in in the 1800's. Money was a scarce item on the frontier as were such fancies as store bought paper cartridges for your revolver. Most folks were still using muzzleloaders so loose powder and ball was always at hand. Back east in the cities and settled parts "most" might have bought paper cartridges except that revolvers were a lot more common from about the Mississippi west. East of the Mississippi the fowling piece, double shotgun and small caliber rifle were a heck of a lot more common than revolvers, as far as any kind of frequent use.
 

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You may be right about the civilians just using flask and ball. The military probably used the most paper cartridges going by the info I have picked here and there . I remember also that civilians use mostly round balls and the military used the conical . Can't remember exactly why cause I always heard the round ball was more accurate and caused more damage on impact . Some Colt Walkers cylinders blew up cause soldiers loaded the conical backwards . Sorry starting to get into my "gun/history nerd" mode !!!
 

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You can't be anymore nerdish about it than me. I always heard and read the Walker cylinder's came apart because of defective steel. I think you're right about the military and paper cartridges. Weren't they issued paper cartridges? I know they were for the muskets and rifled muskets....till they ran out and reverted to loose powder and ball.
 

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Yep the metallurgy was not the best back then and the training was lacking or may of been "well lets try it this way and see what happens the Sgt. not around " and they loaded the conical backwards which caused big pressure and with 50-60gr of powder BOOM ! I think but not sure the Walker may of been one of the first users of a conical bullets and everyone was use to round balls .
 

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Discussion Starter #93
may of been "well lets try it this way and see what happens the Sgt. not around " and they loaded the conical backwards which caused big pressure and with 50-60gr of powder BOOM !.
I’ve had a few experiences of the “senior person isn’t here so let’s see what happens” variety. I should be a natural at this. :D
 

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Well, the Paterson preceded the Walker and I'm not acquainted with any conical use in the Paterson.
 
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Looking around all the molds that came with a cased set for the Paterson it shows a round ball mold . But I have seen pictures of molds that had a round ball and conical combo mold but not sure what revolvers they were for for .
 

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Looking around all the molds that came with a cased set for the Paterson it shows a round ball mold . But I have seen pictures of molds that had a round ball and conical combo mold but not sure what revolvers they were for for .
The Paterson was available in both .31 and .28 caliber and conicals were not used. The combo bullet moulds you are referring to were either .36 (Navy) or .44 (Army). There are combo .31 caliber bullet moulds available but they are for the Colt 1848/1849 Pocket Model.

Regards,

Jim
 

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Discussion Starter #97
Every good gun needs a holster. Got this Triple K holster from Cabella’s for $40.99 once shipping was figured in. Really good quality for the price. Perfect fit for the 1858.

Too bad I still haven’t got to shoot the darn thing. :(


51679AE3-DD1E-4414-9985-57980A0D0670.jpeg
 

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Very nice. Looks great.

Hope you can get out there and make some smoke and noise. Look forward to hearing the range report.
 

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You can't be anymore nerdish about it than me. I always heard and read the Walker cylinder's came apart because of defective steel. I think you're right about the military and paper cartridges. Weren't they issued paper cartridges? I know they were for the muskets and rifled muskets....till they ran out and reverted to loose powder and ball.
The Walker cylinders were wrought iron and made by Eli Whitney, Jr. I don't feel like looking it up but I believe Colt thought Whitney used inferior iron.

Yep the metallurgy was not the best back then and the training was lacking or may of been "well lets try it this way and see what happens the Sgt. not around " and they loaded the conical backwards which caused big pressure and with 50-60gr of powder BOOM ! I think but not sure the Walker may of been one of the first users of a conical bullets and everyone was use to round balls .
I don't think that's the case. If it were I suspect a lot more would have blown up. They say 300 were reported as having blown up but guns that didn't meet inspection or were returned for other problems were included in that number. Also some were reported as blown up and discarded but it's believed most of those were kept by the rangers because they didn't want to give them up.
 
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