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Discussion Starter #1
Says Hudson on one side model W.S. stock is cracked SN A427068 it's an old single shot wondering what it's worth and how old it is
 

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I don't know what those pictures are of but they are useless for identifying anything.
Your shotgun is what I call a "Trade Brand Name" shotgun. Between about 1880 to 1940, there was a great interest in all things having to do with shotguns, designing, making, selling (especially selling) and of course shooting shotguns. Sellers including wholesale sporting goods dealers, retail chain stores and independent sellers (your local hardware store) wanted shotguns with names of their own choosing on them to sell. The major makers were only too happy to meet this demand. They would take one of their standard models and stamp almost any name in the world on it as long as a minimum number were ordered. By my own definition a "Trade Brand Name" shotgun is an inexpensive but not cheaply made shotgun of any type with any name on it other than who made it. Guns with the name HUDSON on the left side and MODEL WS on the right side were made by the Crescent Fire Arms Company of Norwich,CT (1892 to 1930+) for and were sold at wholesale by the Hibbard Spencer Bartlett Company of Chicago,IL a wholesale sporting goods dealer. According to the serial number (427,068) you give, the gun was made in 1917 ninety six years ago. A word of caution about attempting to shoot the gun. Since I can't see the gun to determine its condition, I must recommend that you don't attempt to shoot it. However if you insist on trying to shoot it, have your medical and life insurance paid up, have a few fingers and an eye to spare, then go ahead but only after you have the gun inspected by a good competent gunsmith and he gives his O.K. Then use only appropriate ammunition. The gun was designed and made to use the ammunition of the period which was either black powder or early low pressure smokeless powder and lead shot loaded 2 1/2 inch shot shells. It was not designed to shoot more modern 2 9/16 or 2 3/4 inch shells loaded with smokeless powder and certainly not modern 3 inch magnums loaded with high pressure smokeless powder, steel shot or solid slugs. I make this warning because there are those out there that know nothing about shotguns and think a 12 gauge is a 12 gauge and any shot shell that fits into a gun is safe to shoot. Somewhere, sometime , some damn fool is going to stuff a 3 inch magnum in one of these old guns (it can be done), cock the hammer and pull the trigger. If after various pieces take off for parts unknown, he is still standing with the proper number of fingers and eyes, don't want him coming back to me and saying "You didn't tell me that wasn't safe." About value. Don't depend on that for college tuition or retirement. These guns were inexpensive (by our present day standards) even when new selling for between $10.00 to $15.00. They haven't appreciated much over the passing years. Current value will depend on the guns condition, the amount of original finish remaining on the metal and wood as well as the mechanical condition. A prime condition example (rare because these guns were used hard and received little care or maintenance) that appears to have come out of the factory yesterday afternoon might bring as much as $100 at auction while a rusty and pitted metal, rotten or broken wood and missing parts piece of junk fit only for parts salvage or as a fire place poker might fetch as little as $10.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Ty for the info gun shoots fine seen the guy I got it from shoot it but the stock is bad I got it just as a project gun for stock making payed 50 bucks for it so I chalk it up as a win
 
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