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Hey gents- I was doing some research on a new hunting rifle and found an article that said the number one grab was the new Sako S20. Not sure if $1600 is worth it or if anyone has heard good things? Any suggestions on a new setup would be aprecited thanks in advance.
 

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Get a Tikka instead. It is made by Sako and is a very good gun. It is also about half the price.

I have a Sako M995 in .300 Win Mag and love it. I get consistent 1/2moa groups to 500 yards with it and 1 moa groups to past 1k. I highly recommend Sako if you have the coin.
 

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Wow! $1,600 That's twice as much as I would pay for a great hunting rifle.
Ya Sako's are nice and I have a Tikka 270 that weights a lot.
I would spend $800 / $1,000 on a gun then another $800 / $1,000 for a scope, sling, scope covers, soft case, shell carrier
= $2,000
 

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Not sure if I’d suggest dropping $1600 plus the cost of appropriate optics without understanding what type of hunting you’re planning on doing. In some parts of this great country you won’t be shooting past 75 yards. Then on the other hand? If you have the cash then get whatever you like. If money were no object I’d have one of these in my safe.....and only $125,000.00

 

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Not sure if I’d suggest dropping $1600 plus the cost of appropriate optics without understanding what type of hunting you’re planning on doing. In some parts of this great country you won’t be shooting past 75 yards. Then on the other hand? If you have the cash then get whatever you like. If money were no object I’d have one of these in my safe.....and only $125,000.00

and i complain about cost of a $700 30-30, lol
 

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I do LIK. Carrying a 22 when out after squirrels is becoming a burden when I have to handle a saber toothed squirrel that is charging. Pay is miserable and the benefit package is worse..... 😁

Actually, most vierlings aren't that heavy, usually 8 lbs. less.
 

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I think once you go beyond say $500 your no longer buying a hunting rifle but some form of what some might call art. I've got a 1903 Springfield customized my Paul Jaeger in 1945. Still works fine today and with a bit of care will work fine for many more years. If I had bought a J.C. Higgins when I was in high school, 1964, I'm quite certain with care it would still be killing things today. If you want an investment then maybe go beyond the $500-$600 mile mark. Then you just have to wait and see if it works or not.

Had I got that J.C. Higgins in 1964 it would probably bring more today than it did back then, not a lot but more! On the other hand, while stationed in Germany about 1968, I got a Sako L61R and a Sako L461 for $85 each through the base club! I would encourage you to look for something you can afford that will do the job and not think of value down the road, better thing's to invest in for making money than guns! Don't see many f those old J.C. Higgins or the old Mossberg 800's. They were inexpensive and people tend to not take as good of care of something they consider "cheap"! But find one today and I strongly suspect it will still do what it was designed to do if it was taken care of. My Win 70 Featherweight was about $750 when I got it and new about the same today. Beautiful rifle, shoot's well and fairly boring as all it does is just kill things! I've taken care of it so many more years in it. Have a couple Mossberg Patriot's I got just because. I suspect in 40yrs if given the same care as a $1500 rifle it will last as long and keep working the way it was designed to.

Now a relatively inexpensive rifle that get's lot's of praise it the Tikki, also supposed to be very accurate. As for accuracy, how much do you really need? Get into reloading and likely as not you get a really inexpensive rifle and make it shoot 1/2" moa and your gonna praise it forever. Spend $1600 on a beautiful rifle that best it will do is 1 1/2"moa and one has to go it will likely be the expensive one! Go figure, reloading turns normally sane people into monster's not happy with much of any thing shooting over an inch. Problem is the target in comparison is huge! I would look at Savage, Mossberg and Ruger were I you. Everything more expensive rifle's are designed to do, they do as well, other than the wow factor!
 

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Don, I certainly hope a 1964 JC Higgins would still be "killing things"!!!! Most of my rifles are nearing 100 years old and more than a few are well past that mark. They're all still killin' stuff or at least capable.
 

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Don, I certainly hope a 1964 JC Higgins would still be "killing things"!!!! Most of my rifles are nearing 100 years old and more than a few are well past that mark. They're all still killin' stuff or at least capable.
I posted that because I hear so often about the expensive rifle's lasting much much longer. May e true but I'd bet it because they get taken better care of.
 

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I'd agree with that to a point Don and I don't say that to start anything, just my observations. What I think is those that wore out quickly or without much use weren't intended to last all that long in the first place. A lot of them didn't receive very good care either, as you mentioned. How many of us know of some that spent most of their life in a barn, wood shed, shop, hung over the back door or setting behind it for decades? Like the Eastern Arms I have that was my Grandpa's. I'm thinking of the.....millions(?)....of lower end firearms made by Crescent, H&I, I/J and others. There's a lot of old Savage 340's around still capable and in good shape. There's literally piles of old Savage, Stevens, Marlin, Remington, Springfield and Winchester lower end 22's still working. Quite a few old to very old Marlin and Winchester lever rifles still doing duty as well.

Of all the rifles I've fooled with over my life, the German and some American Schuetzen rifles seem to have received the best overall care. Most have bores that look new. American and British rifles seem to have received about equal care, regardless of cost. Some are really nice, some really bad with the vast majority falling somewhere in between. I never cease to be amazed at the condition of most Germanic and Scandinavian rifles, whether the most basic of rifles or top of the line, bespoke rifles....and some of those have seen yeoman's use. They don't receive the press of the British hunters but the Germans were every bit the world wide hunters the Brits were. As far as "hunting at home", there's no comparison between the two....obviously habitat and population density played a large part in that.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Wow I didn’t think I’d get such great feedback. Thanks I was offline for a bit but now I see I should have come back sooner
 

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Wow I didn’t think I’d get such great feedback. Thanks I was offline for a bit but now I see I should have come back sooner
That's whatcha get fer thinkin'!!!!...... 😁
 
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