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This is the first post of a recently inherited collection for which I'm trying to determine resale value. This rifle is by far the most interesting to me personally, as it is one of the few pieces I don't recall ever seeing from my father's collection.

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It appears to be some type of custom-build; the barrel contains a "Winchester MODEL 70" and "22 JET" stamp, and appears to be an entirely different (and newer) material than the rest of the rifle. The trigger portion contains stamping "MADE BY THE BIRMINGHAM SMALL ARMS Co Ltd" on one side and "COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA" on the opposite. A kangaroo logo can be seen on the top, and there are also stampings on the shoulder stock that read "A C C C", "N.S.W.", "4 7 97" and "8/09".

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I've never fired this rifle, so I can't remark on its performance, but there are obvious wear marks, including several scuffs and scratches on the barrel and scope. There are some small "dents" in the wood stock, but no scratches. The wood finish is smooth all around.

I'm very curious about this piece, not only in terms of value, but in age & origin, as I literally have zero background information for it. I recognize that I would certainly benefit from improved lighting - I'll hope to have better photos for future posts.
 

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I believe what you have there is a BSA No.4 Martini made for Australia circa 1909/10 in .310 caliber, commonly referred to as .310 Cadet. Nice rifle!

p.s. .22 Jet is a bottlenecked center fire cartridge, essentially a .357 Magnum case necked down to accept .22 diameter projectiles.

Just a guess because the markings are indistinct, but it looks as if a Winchester Model 70 .22 Hornet barrel was utilized in building this nifty rifle.
 

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Mac is correct in his assessment of the rifle. These little guns were often rebarreled to a different caliber as the original ammo became scarce. Today 22 Jet ammo is very hard to come by as well. Someone interested in shooting it may once again rebarrel it to something more common. The 22 Jet was an odd cartridge introduced by S&W for their revolvers. It had extraction problems and was short lived. The scope is a K3 Weaver which at the time was a good scope but is also outdated by today's standards. The gun hold little to no value as a collector item but as a shooter it is worth a few hundred dollars. It is next to impossible to accurately value a more less one of a kind rifle. This gun would do its best being sold on an online auction as it will take the right buyer to realize maximum dollar potential.
 

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In the right place there's still quite a following of the little Martini action as original rifles and for the action for a build. Many of the 310 Cadets were reamed to 32-20, another fine little cartridge.
 
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