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Discussion Starter #1
So much work to do. I usually improvise, but with so many "gunsmithing" projects now in the works, I better buy some punches n stuff, like actual firearms specific screw drivers. projects include #1 Complete restore on Dads .22. #2 Firing pin replacement on my little .25ACP. #3 some adjustments on my Stevens 87A, its having feeding issues it'll cycle 2 rounds and not fully close on the 3rd ( ill add a pic of what i mean when i return from picking up the boy from work). Ive eliminated ammo as a cause as i tried it with 4 types and got the same results. #4 the 410 project.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
242689

It was only closing to hear about 3/32 or 3mm short if I pushed the pulled full forward where it was supposed to be it wouldn't fire.
 

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I wish I knew enough about firearms to justify actual firearm specific tools. Gunsmithing is something I wish I had learned in my younger years. Considering the lack of knowledgeable gunsmiths these days, I could be making a fortune.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I did take a gunsmithing correspondence course when I was 20 (30 years ago), Ive forgotten most of what i learned and seem to blank terms a lot and sound like an idiot then the next day I sound like I actually know what I'm doing....lol. however the punches and screw drivers are not to exspensive. I know my limits and tend to stay witin those parameters. do I have the wood working skills to make a new stock for dads gun from scratch? Yes I do. Do I want to do so? which is why I bought a stock if I have to do some modifications to make it fit correctly, That I can do. do I know how to remove the firing pin on my little 25ACP? Nope not a clue. the firing pin is housed in the slide, I see a couple of pins in it im assuming need to be punched out and ill go from there.
 

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I did take a gunsmithing correspondence course when I was 20 (30 years ago), Ive forgotten most of what i learned and seem to blank terms a lot and sound like an idiot then the next day I sound like I actually know what I'm doing....lol. however the punches and screw drivers are not to exspensive. I know my limits and tend to stay witin those parameters. do I have the wood working skills to make a new stock for dads gun from scratch? Yes I do. Do I want to do so? which is why I bought a stock if I have to do some modifications to make it fit correctly, That I can do. do I know how to remove the firing pin on my little 25ACP? Nope not a clue. the firing pin is housed in the slide, I see a couple of pins in it im assuming need to be punched out and ill go from there.
What kind of .25? Perhaps I can help.
 

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Gunsmithing on your own guns is ok but DO NOT DO IT ON ANYBODYS ELSES GUNS. That is a recipe for a law suit. And with out the proper licensing and insurance it will cost you all you own.
And if ANYBODY thinks you can get rich by being a gunsmith then you are dreaming. You will pay your bills but that is it.
By the time you pay your shop bills (Lic. Insurance and so on) you do not have much left.
You will get a few bucks for your pocket but will not become a "Rich" person.
 

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If you are going to buy a few punches, be sure to add some roll pin punches to your list. Getting the pins out is easy, I ruined quite a few roll pins when putting them in until I finally bought punches made for that.
 

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Yeah, years ago I bought a small Wheeler gunsmith screwdriver set with a bunch of bits, wish I would’ve bought it years ago, it really helps not buggering up gun screws with an “almost the right one” screwdriver I used to use in my younger more stupid (and cheaper) years😎

I need to buy another set of punches though, I’m on my third or fourth set. The thin steel ones I eventually bend and the thin brass ones I eventually break...even with my light gunsmith brass or plastic hammers, and not the 20 oz claw hammers I used when I was younger and more stupid😎
 

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Discussion Starter #9
If you are going to buy a few punches, be sure to add some roll pin punches to your list. Getting the pins out is easy, I ruined quite a few roll pins when putting them in until I finally bought punches made for that.
they have a nice set by wheeler at midsouth, for $36 i was gonna get since i have many other items i can use them on.

Gunsmithing on your own guns is ok but DO NOT DO IT ON ANYBODYS ELSES GUNS. That is a recipe for a law suit. And with out the proper licensing and insurance it will cost you all you own.
And if ANYBODY thinks you can get rich by being a gunsmith then you are dreaming. You will pay your bills but that is it.
By the time you pay your shop bills (Lic. Insurance and so on) you do not have much left.
You will get a few bucks for your pocket but will not become a "Rich" person.
i only work on my own stuff when it comes to guns as for the referernce for my dads gun, he just died so im pretty sure im safe there

What kind of .25? Perhaps I can help.
its an off brand copy of what appears to be a MAB type 1 model A, it looks like the exact same gun inside and out from the pics ive seen
 

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I'm not a gunsmith by any means, but do work on my own guns thanks to help from YouTube. One lesson I learned quickly about punches is that you get what you pay for. The cheap chinesium stuff is great for the everyday stuff, but when working on pins that are a bit hard, they just bend and break like butter. So I bought a couple of sets of Grace USA punches (one set to drive the roll pins out, the other to drive them back in). Also make sure the set you get has both the long and short set. The short set is to start up a pin, the long set is to drive it all the way through. These things are what American made is all about and make gunsmithing a lot less stressful.

Next on my wish list is a set of Chapman bits.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I'm not a gunsmith by any means, but do work on my own guns thanks to help from YouTube. One lesson I learned quickly about punches is that you get what you pay for. The cheap chinesium stuff is great for the everyday stuff, but when working on pins that are a bit hard, they just bend and break like butter. So I bought a couple of sets of Grace USA punches (one set to drive the roll pins out, the other to drive them back in). Also make sure the set you get has both the long and short set. The short set is to start up a pin, the long set is to drive it all the way through. These things are what American made is all about and make gunsmithing a lot less stressful.

Next on my wish list is a set of Chapman bits.
I do have caviar tastes but only a vienna sausage budget. on that note i have many chinesium tools that have outlasted my snap on and mac tools. im still using my harbor freight angle grinder i bought 20 years ago my dewalt only lasted 1.5 years
 
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