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I am trying to import my Grandfathers antiques, one of the items is a flintlock musket unsure if it legitimate, to be honest it holds sentimental value so even if it is a replica I will be importing it, just need to know where it comes from originally, it's make/model.

tried looking online for hours to figure it out myself, between the flat stock, the metal buttplate and the strange right degree drop in the stock right behind the flintlock mechanism almost like some North African or Oriental flintlocks, I am struggling.

I hope some of you can help me identify this, thanks.
 

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Can you post anymore pictures. We need close ups of the barrel, lock and any other features. Also, look for proof marks or stamping near the breech of the barrel.

The stock looks to have been cut down.
 

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Welcome to the FORUM. Without having having any details about it's pedigree, I'd guess it's a "Trade Rifle". These were old European military arms that were parted out and pieced together from about the 1880s on through the 1930s to be sold to African tribes as primitive hunting arms. They had no value as military weapons, but for people that were survival hunting with spears and the such, these were much more effective for hunting, and were "recycled" for that purpose.
 

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While the pictures do not show much detail I can say it looks like a military lock fitted to a re-purposed stock, note the ill fit at the back of the lock. The stock and bands look crude and inexpensive. The trigger guard and barrel may be military as well. Unless some well versed in trade rifles can nail it down you have a parts gun at best. Better pictures would help determine moe about the lock and barrel. An inside picture of the lock would be great if it comes out easily.
 

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I don't believe it's a replica and sentimentality trumps value every time. Best I can do is agree with Twice and Old Guns.
 

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Just a guess based on the lock and trigger, but it looks like parts from a French Charleville musket were used to repair an older gun. The stock more resembles something from India or the Far East rather than Mid East or Africa.

There is no make or model, these were made by hand by individual craftsmen who's blueprints existed only in their mind's eye rather than mass produced by a factory. No two of them are exactly alike even if they were built by the same craftsman.
 
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