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Discussion Starter #1
My father in law gave me an SKS this past weekend. he was told by the guy that sold it to him several years ago that it is fully automatic. from all the research I have come up w the SKS was only made semi-automatic. So my first question is "was the SKS ever manufactured as a fully automatic?"

In doing my research I have found that this is the chinese version. I believe it to be the "56" model. I could be mistaken on that part. So far all the serial numbers match. however on the top of the reciever back. the serial numbers are only on the back and there are NO markings on the top.

I have also noticed that some SKS's ar rare and more like collectors items. I doubt this is the case but I still need to verify that before I take it out and shoot it and ruin it.
 

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The SKS was never made as a full auto, and that one is not. Some have been converted (mostly illegally), but the rifle was designed as a semi-auto with a fixed 10 round magazine.

Some SKS models are uncommon and worth a bit more than average, but I don't know of any Chinese versions that fall into that category. One source says that over 600 million SKS's were made in China alone, and millions more made all over the Communist bloc. Rare ones are those made in East Germany, North Korea, and North Vietnam.

Jim
 

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Some SKS models are uncommon and worth a bit more than average, but I don't know of any Chinese versions that fall into that category.
There are Chinese variants that command much higher prices than the run-of-the-mill models, such as the SKS-D and SKS-M. But yeah, this one seems to be a typical Chicom SKS. Not particularly collectible due to rarity or anything, but still a nice example. Especially since it has an intact bayonet lug and all-matching numbers. A lot of these Chinese SKS's were bubbatized by their owners, so every year it gets harder and harder to find original condition examples. In the long run, these will become quite collectible if left in their original configuration.

As for being fully automatic, there was indeed a fully-automatic variant of the SKS made in China (called the Type 63), but those were of course never brought here to the US. Not on purpose, anyway. A few of them got accidentally imported with the Type 56 models, but they were mostly weeded out and sent back.

Nzapton, I would take that story of it being fully automatic as a cautionary tale. The SKS, when not properly maintained, can slam-fire. This occurs when, for example, the firing pin (which is supposed to be free-floating in the bolt) gets stuck in the forward position. The rifle will go full-auto and even releasing the trigger will not stop it. It will continue to fire until the magazine is empty. People have died from SKS slam-fires. So if the guy told your father-in-law that it was full-auto, he may have actually experienced a slam-fire. You should remove the receiver cover, recoil spring, and bolt carrier, so you can get the bolt itself out of the rifle. Shake it back and forth, and you should hear the firing pin rattle freely inside of it. If the firing pin is at all sticky, you need to disassemble the bolt to clean it.

In many cases, slam-fires were the result of people not fully cleaning the cosmoline out of the bolt. It can act like glue for the firing pin, especially when it starts to get gunpowder residue caked up in there. Or that red primer sealant from foreign 7.62x39 that tends to flake off. Make sure the bolt is clean and the firing pin rattles freely! An accidental slam-fire can be a very bad thing, especially since it can be accompanied by an out-of-battery detonation.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanx for the info everyone. I have read about the possibility of slam fires. And given the fact that this particular rifle hasn't been fired in years n years I fully intend to take it to my local gunsmith for inspection first. I just didn't want to get there n it be fully automatic then I get in trouble for having it n not having the right permits for it.


I have read about the conversion kits n since all the numbers do match on it I doubt at this time it has been converted but ill let an expert check it any way before I do pull the trigger on it just to be sure.

Someone earlier posted that if it has been converted it was probably done illegally. If one day I ever do decide to convert it; is there a LEGAL conversion?
 

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nothing after 86 for civies...

read the NFA paperwork.

sks are super easy to take apart. you can figure out at your kitchen table if the fire pin is dragging..
 

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If one day I ever do decide to convert it; is there a LEGAL conversion?
YES! But it is not simple, inexpensive, or fast.

Fill out ATF form 7 (Application for Federal Firearms License), mark the type 07 license, pay the $150 for three years, then fill out the Special Tax Registration and Return - National Firearms Act form, file it with ATF, and pay the required $1000 per year (or $500 per year if you're small enough).

Then, when you have the manufacturing FFL and the SOT, you're good to legally convert that thing to a fully automatic rifle. Of course, it you can never transfer it to anyone in the United States other than government agencies or other SOT dealers, but it is possible to legally convert it... eventually.
 

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are class 3 dealers allowed to keep 'dealer samples' after their license expires?
 

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Thanx for the info everyone. I have read about the possibility of slam fires. And given the fact that this particular rifle hasn't been fired in years n years I fully intend to take it to my local gunsmith for inspection first. I just didn't want to get there n it be fully automatic then I get in trouble for having it n not having the right permits for it.
This is just my opinion, but I would strongly suggest that you look at it yourself first. There is no reason to take it to a gunsmith for this. You can Google the SKS trigger group and find all the information you need in order to inspect it and make sure nothing has been tampered with. It will be obvious if any 'conversion' has been done to it. Not only will this save you the expense of a gunsmith, but it will make you more familiar with the workings of your rifle.

But more importantly, if indeed it was tampered with, you will be opening yourself up to some pretty serious legal trouble. Unless you have a gunsmith that you personally know and trust, he might be the type who would report it to the ATF, and even if you were to manage to avoid federal felony charges yourself, you could be exposing your father-in-law to trouble. Simply put, this really needs to stay private until you're sure.

Removing the trigger group is very simple, and can theoretically be done without even using any tools. All you do is flip the rifle upside down and locate the little dimpled tab behind the trigger guard. This is a spring catch that locks it into the receiver. Make sure the safety is on, with the lever flipped towards the stock. You can use the tip of a 7.62x39 cartridge to depress the catch (pushing the bullet tip into the dimple and pressing forward towards the muzzle). The trigger group will pop up and away from the receiver; there's a spring in there that pops it out. Then you simply pull it out and you can see most of the 'guts' of the trigger group. Again, you can find instructions for further disassembly of the trigger group online if you need to do a close inspection of the sear, trigger bar, etc. But it should be obvious if it's been tampered with, since you'll see parts missing or altered.
 

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with it unloaded you can also manually palpitate the bolt holdingthe trigger and see how it reacts, in addition to pulling hte trigger group out to look for mods.

it really is a pretty ewasy gun to work on.. take a look yourself before taking it in.

IFbI found it was a non papered full auto.. I'd cut it in half at the rcvr ..
 

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IFbI found it was a non papered full auto.. I'd cut it in half at the rcvr ..
Sheesh, no need to get crazy here. Any FA modifications would have been done inside the trigger group, not the receiver or bolt. It would simply be a matter of replacing the trigger group itself, or even just replacing the altered parts of the TG (replacements are easy enough to find), and then the rifle is perfectly legal again.
 

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i'd cut the trigger group then.. as just owning the 2 seperate pieces would be constructive possession of an unregistered machinegun... I wouldn't want to spend time in club fed for that..
 

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are class 3 dealers allowed to keep 'dealer samples' after their license expires?
Nope. Can't transfer it to themselves, so it has to go before they drop the SOT.

If you want a machine gun, the way I described isn't worth it. You're better off just paying stupid-high prices for a pre-'86 transferable gun. But it is technically possible to do a legal full-auto conversion if for some reason you really, really want that particular gun to be a machine gun.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thanks again for all the help.

Yeah I agree that for all that hassel there is no reason to modify it myself.

I have field dtriped it this morning and while I conceede I havent taken apart too many rifles...this is by far the nastiest thing I've ever worked on. its like someone poured Syrup inside it. Everythign si stuck together by GOO. the springs that should just pop right out I had to actually pull out because they were stuck in there. then the rods that guide those springs...I had to pull the springs off of them.

but with a lot of cotton patches...all of the gun cleaner I had left...some warm soapy water and a bunch of Q tips i managed to get it pretty clean again. Inside of the barrel is nice n shiney and smooth.

but just like some of you were saying the firing pin is sticky. NOT free floating. I can move it with my finger but it is hard to do. I do NOT hear it rattle as I shake the bolt. how do I get the firing pin out of the bolt to make sure it is good and clean?
 

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That "goo" is cosmoline. Sounds like nobody ever bothered to disassemble and clean the rifle, which may mean it has not been fired at all.

When you drive out the pin from the bolt, make sure you use the right size punch. Otherwise, you may end up distorting it and you'll never get it in properly again. Also, be careful not to lose the tiny extractor spring! But most importantly, pay close attention to the orientation of the firing pin when you take it out. Make absolutely sure that it goes back in the same way. The humps and flat spots on it need to be oriented properly.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I figured it had to be something that was put there on purpose because even the "cleaning" kit in the but stock was covered in it.
 
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