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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guy n gals and thanks in advance for your help.
A friend brought this old Iver Johnson 32 cal top strap and asked if it would still shoot and how much I thought it would be worth. My research so far has guessed it to have been made somewhere around the 1920's, but that's based on my limited knowledge of this particular manufacturer.
As far as shootabilility... I would have concerns there. The most notable is that cylinder the spins freely unless loaded. I loaded it with empty cases and it functions perfectly. The cylinder catch rises during trigger pull, and falls after the hammer drop and the spur rotates the cylinder properly as the trigger is being pulled as long as there are cases in the cylinder. But empty there is no rotation and the cylinder can be spun freely.
I am not certain if this was how they were made back then or not.
I have included pics of the serial number found on the trigger guard and on the frame under the left hand grip as well as the manufacturer stamp on the sight ramp on the barrel. And a overall of the pistol.
Any information and advice is extremely appreciated, thanks
SBSATS
247594


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It's a 2nd Model Safety Automatic which was made up through 1908. Don't have the book on hand right now to give the exact year yours was made..

Unless you have a bunch of spare parts, that one is probably best off being a wall hanger.
The cylinder was designed to free spin loaded or empty. The cylinder retainer threads are worn out by the looks of things. There should only be one hammer spring in there! And I think the firing pin spring is gone.

The 2nd Models were designed for use with black powder ammunition.

Value wise with no finish, incorrect grips, etc.. is only about $40 max.
 

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Strange that there's no letter prefix to the serial number.
Best I can date it to is 1904-1908 based on the barrel markings and having the SN on the bottom of the trigger guard. Might be able to narrow it down a little more based on the patent markings.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you my friend. I was pretty close and your assessment makes me feel better telling buddy my assignment. It's a little difficult when you don't exactly how something was designed.
 
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