In honor of my new stove... A TFF recipe contest

Discussion in 'Ruffit's Domestic & Wild Game Cooking/ Recipe Foru' started by Rae Harrison, Jul 13, 2020.

  1. Rae Harrison

    Rae Harrison Well-Known Member

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    I just ordered a beautiful 36 inch 5 burner gas range...
    In it's honor TFF is hosting is first ever recipe contest.
    Rules. A real recipe, nothing inedible.
    Regional recipes or family recipes most welcome.
    Sam @Shooter45 and Larry @ysacres and myself will pick winners. Prizes?
    Gentleman start your stoves!
     
  2. ysacres

    ysacres Moderator Moderator Supporting Member

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    Hey! I can't pick the winner Because I want to Enter the contest.:stir:

    Cracker Jack.
    1 cup molasses
    1 cup sugar
    2 tablespoons vinegar
    2 Tablespoons butter
    1/4 teaspoon soda
    6 cups popped corn
    1 cup salted nuts
    mix the first four ingredients together in a saucepan bring to boil over medium heat without stirring. Allow to come to a hard boil, then add soda.
    pour over popcorn and let cool on cookie sheet.
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2020

  3. Rae Harrison

    Rae Harrison Well-Known Member

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    Then how about @Suicide*Ride because it was his idea?
    Larry, you come up with recipe categories....
    Baking, main dishes ect..
     
  4. ysacres

    ysacres Moderator Moderator Supporting Member

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    1. Breakfast.
    2 lunch.
    3.Dinner/Supper.
    4. appetizer.
    5. main course.
    6. dessert.
     
  5. ms6852

    ms6852 GUNZILLA Supporting Member

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    How about cake and a bottle of rum = Rum Cake!:p
     
  6. joe45c

    joe45c Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    I can't cook a egg, so i will knock off a few beers and sit this one out.:cheers:
     
  7. flboots

    flboots Well-Known Member

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    1lb bacon
    hash browns
    6 eggs.
    put bacon in skillet till crispy, take off, put hash browns in bacon grease till golden brown and crispy. take out of skillet. put in eggs cook over easy. add toast and fresh cowboy coffee. Place hot food on platter, put on table in front of me. than stand back. Not responsible for fork stabbings withing arms reach.
     
  8. gdmoody

    gdmoody Full Time Moderator Moderator Supporting Member

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    You forgot grits!
     
  9. LIKTOSHOOT

    LIKTOSHOOT No Power Options Supporting Member

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    So! It didn`t come with cooking instructions.
    The truth is out there.
    :lol:
     
  10. flboots

    flboots Well-Known Member

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    Im a displaced Yankee. LOL
     
  11. BlackEagle

    BlackEagle TFF Chaplain Supporting Member

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    Aberdeen Rowies
    I've never made these; I buy them from the shop. Delicious warmed up or cold with some butter on them.

    Some background: http://slowfoodaberdeen.com/traditional-buttery

    A unique breakfast item associated with Aberdeen City & Shire. Butteries are very popular in and around Aberdeen City & Shire but, until recently, virtually unheard of elsewhere.
    The buttery has a distinctive crispy, flaky, flattened structure and a pronounced buttery, salty taste and its crisp shortness is balanced with a chewy elasticity.

    Historically the buttery was taken onboard boats by fishermen sailing from many of the North East ports. Its high fat content, often meat dripping, provided a concentrated source of energy and this in addition to its salt content gave the product a long shelf life. Those boats were powered by oars and sometimes by sails so they needed the energy.

    Aberdeen Butteries https://www.scottishrecipes.co.uk/butteries.php
    250g (9 oz) butter
    125g (4.5 oz)lard
    1 tablespoon soft brown sugar
    500g (17 oz) flour
    2 teaspoons of dried yeast
    450ml (15 fl oz) warm water
    Pinch of salt
    Aberdeen Buttery Recipe
    This Aberdeen buttery recipe should make about 16.
    1. Make a paste from the yeast, sugar and a wee bit of the warm water and set aside.
    2. Mix the flour and the salt together. Once the yeast has bubbled up add this and mix well to a dough and leave to rise.
    3. Cream the butter and lard and divide into three portions.
    4. Once the dough has doubled in size give it a good knead then roll into a rectangle about 1cm thick.
    5. Then spread one portion of the butter mixture over two thirds of the dough.
    6. Fold the remaining third of the dough over onto the butter mixture and fold the other bit over - giving three layers. Roll this back to the original size.
    7. Allow to cool for 40 minutes.
    8. Repeat stages 5-7 of this Aberdeen butteries recipe twice more.
    9. Cut the dough into 16 pieces and shape each to a rough circle and place on baking trays. 10. Set aside to rise for about 45 minutes then bake at 200 degrees C (392 degrees F) for 15 minutes.

    They look like this:
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2020
  12. Suicide*Ride

    Suicide*Ride DEPLORABLE member Supporting Member

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    Rea, I was thinking something along the lines of Larry's list. Pick a few recipes and break in that pretty, new stove. What better than to fire it up - making member's fav. recipes... :rolleyes:

    I think Blackeagle's butteries are a must! :D

    S*r
     
  13. Rae Harrison

    Rae Harrison Well-Known Member

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    Me too!!
    :):):):love::love:
     
  14. rawright54

    rawright54 Philogynist & Sycophant, Looking For Work Supporting Member

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    I have a couple to toss in the pot:

    My grandmother called this first one Pig in a Poke, but my friends across the pond assure me that the proper name for it is Toad in a Hole. It is simply link sausages ( I like Farmer John, myself) baked into a Yorkshire Pudding, to wit -

    1. In a cast iron skillet, brown an 8 oz package ( do take the wrapping off first, please ) of breakfast sausages, but not too well done. They'll be baking later...
    2. Blend together a cup of flour, a cup of milk, one egg and a teaspoon of salt. I like to add pepper, as well, but that's not the original.
    3. Arrange the hot sausages in their native grease evenly in the pan. If there's less than 1/4 cup of grease, add a little oil to make up the grease level.
    4. Pour the batter evenly over the sausages, then place the pan, uncovered into the oven, pre-heated to 450F.
    5. Bake for 30 - 45 minutes, until the pudding has risen and turned a golden color on top.

    When you take the pan out, immediately pour off the grease before it gets soaked back into the pudding, then turn the big round pie onto a cutting board to cool. Be gentle, as it can easily collapse until it cools. Slice and enjoy; Happy Heart Attack!

    (BTW - My own name for this stuff is Swine Pie)
     
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  15. rawright54

    rawright54 Philogynist & Sycophant, Looking For Work Supporting Member

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    Another favorite has no name; I invented it because I love beef stroganoff and beef burgundy, but I'm too lazy to spend much time on either. Both start the same way:

    1. Slice a pound of cheap steak - round steak will do nicely - into thin slices or small chunks about 1/2" square, whichever you prefer. Traditionally the stroganoff is sliced, while the burgundy beef is cubed, but who cares?
    2. Brown the meat in a cast iron skillet lightly, with a little vegetable oil to keep it from sticking.
    3. Add 2 cans of beef broth and a packet of Lipton Onion Soup mix and bring the mix to a boil.
    4. Lower the heat and let it simmer until the meat is tender as a worm and some of the liquid has been reduced.
    5. Add 1 small can of sliced mushrooms and 1 can of condensed mushroom soup - the golden mushroom tastes a bit better, but can be hard to find - and stir the mix until the soup is completely mixed.
    6. Continue simmering until the gravy cooks down to a nice, thick consistency, stirring often. Once you add the mushroom soup it tends to spatter, so a cover is a good idea.

    At this point you have to decide - stroganoff or burgundy. For stroganoff, add 1/2 cup (or more, if you really like it) of sour cream; for burgundy beef, add 1/4 cup (or more, if you're related to Graham Kerr) of burgundy. Stir well and serve over rice or noodles.

    Since I hate cooking for one, I make a double or triple batch, but stop short before adding the final ingredient. I divide the pot into multiple containers and freeze it for later use. When I want one or the other, I thaw one while the rice or noodles cook, add the last ingredient, then microwave the stuff and pour it over the rice or noodles. Yum!
     
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