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Discussion Starter #1
Hello.
My brother and I just inherited two guns and I would like to know more information about them. I am only interested in monetary value as it would pertain to adding them on my insurance.

First is a H&R .32 caliber, top-break, 5 shot revolver. I believe this gun may have been carried by my great grandfather when he was a policeman for the coal mines in Northeastern Pennsylvania. There is no caliber marking on the side of the barrel. Only the stamping on the top as seen in the photo. Not sure about the serial number. When I removed the grips, "22993 was stamped on the frame and scratched on the grip halves. On the bottom of the frame strap, as seen in the photo, there seems to be some other number or symbol in front of the 22993. The gun shows some wear and has some surface rust. It has been stored in a leather holster in a garage in humid South Carolina for the past few years.

The second gun is a Luger, 7.65 Parabellum. Model number 3865. It does NOT have any symbols denoting manufacture for swiss or american markets. This gun is said to have been a war trophy brought back by a relative. But it may have come into the family in some other way. I am of German and Polish ancestry.

Any info you folks can fill in for me would be great.

Thanks in advance.
Eric B

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Eric, welcome to The Firearms Forum. You would be a lot better off if you listed each gun it its own thread. You will also need lots of pictures, of each side, top, bottom, front, and back. The top is an important picture when identifying the Luger, it tells who made it and possible when. I don't know anything about the H&R, but can tell you that the Luger is a commercial model, made to be exported. They would not put the word "Germany" on a gun their military would be using.
 

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The stamp "Germany" on a Luger (P08) is unusual and seems it's a fake. If no other proof marks from Germany on it, than it's certain, it's a fake, but nice pictures.
 

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It would have to have been marked "Germany" to be imported to the US. I believe the mark is aftermarket.
 

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the h&r is about $80.00, the luger I have no clue. I had a few of the h&r models and they were good wall hangers.
 

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Judging from the toggle configuration ("dished" knobs) , barrel length (seems to be 4 3/4"), caliber, as well as the grip safety and apparent lack of a shoulder stock lug, I believe you have a 1900 Commercial Model. Can't hazard a guess on value, but I do know they're scarce - particularly in the condition your pistol is in. Hope that helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
I did not expect the H&R to have much monetary value considering its condition. I will try to clean it and perhaps coat it with something to prevent further corrosion. I don't think I will try shooting it with modern ammunition. When it is locked in position, there is a bit of play between the barrel/cylinder assembly and the handle/trigger assembly. Not sure if that is normal or not.

Below are some more photos of the Luger. I am definitely ready to give up on the "war trophy" story. especially considering that I have a manual for it. Don't know why that never occurred to me before. The "Germany" marking makes a strong case for it being a commercial model. In my opinion, it is in excellent condition. There is some damage to the checkering on the right side grip, probably from a holster. I forgot to take a photo of the holster. It seems like this may be a good item to add to my homeowners insurance if I can firm up an approximate value. I do hope to clean it, lubricate it and shoot it occasionally with more modern ammunition. I don't trust the ammo in these boxes. The barrel length is about 4 3/4". I used my dial caliper as a depth gauge and measured from the muzzle back to what appears to be the rear end of the barrel and it really measured closer to 4 5/8". But I don't know the correct way to measure the barrel.
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Your pictures are extremely dark and blurry when enlarged. From what I can see, it does look like a 1900 Commercial model. It would be nice to see the other side of the gun, too and in better light (outside). The proof marks on the bottom of the barrel look like German Commercial Proofs.

I am not really comfortable in throwing out values but I will say that the 1997 book of Luger's that I am looking in shows the value of a 1900 commercial model in excellent condition as $3500. Add 20 years to that and go from there!

I would not be afraid to shoot the ammo, but seeing how old it is, it most likely has some collector value.
 

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The barrel length is about 4 3/4". I used my dial caliper as a depth gauge and measured from the muzzle back to what appears to be the rear end of the barrel and it really measured closer to 4 5/8".
Just a guess on my part, but while reference material lists the 1900 Commercial's barrel lengths at 4 3/4" (app. 6000 pistols produced) and 7" (app. 700), I suspect that's just to make life easier for folks not used to dealing with the metric measurements.
 

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It would have to have been marked "Germany" to be imported to the US. I believe the mark is aftermarket.
It's a Borchardt-Luger mod.1900, 7,65 x 21mm, manufactured by DWM (Deutsche Waffen- und Munitionsfabriken), Berlin, Germany, delivered by contract to the swiss army, therefore the mark "Germany". German proof marks, crown over B (Beschuss, proofed), crown over U (Untersucht, investigated), crown over G (Gezogener Lauf, rifled barrel). Barrel length by this model 120mm.
Gun in an excellent condition and very seldom, in Switzerland it's called Parabellum.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Marblekonus,

Thank you for the info regarding the proof marks. Also, regarding manufacture for the Swiss army. I had seen a picture somewhere showing the Swiss cross on the top of models made for Switzerland, but this gun does not have that mark. Would that marking have denoted a gun for commercial sale in Switzerland as opposed to one made for the Swiss Army?
 

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Discussion Starter #15
That is the site where I saw the pictures with the extra emblems for import to different countries. I had forgotten to bookmark it. Thank you.
 
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