The Firearms Forum banner
1 - 20 of 36 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Good afternoon everyone.

I recently inherited this rifle from my dad and its been passed down from son to son since my family first landed in South Africa from Germany to help in the Anglo War as Doctors.

Unfortunately I was not blessed enough to have a son to pass this onto, hence me wanting to speak to you guys to please help me in figuring out a value on the rifle and the original bullets. I'm truly sorry if there are things I'm missing on and hope that one or many of you can help direct me as I'm no gun expert.

Stay blessed,

Justin Ortlepp

Wood Air gun Trigger Shotgun Gun accessory

Musical instrument Hand tool Wood Wind instrument Metal

Wood Natural material Musical instrument Metal Artifact

Brown Wood Rectangle Tints and shades Automotive exterior

Wood Twig Shotgun Metal Wire

Air gun Wood Trigger Shotgun Gun barrel

Outerwear Wood Human leg Metal Art
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,985 Posts
Justin, (by the way, that is my youngest son's name), I hope I don't burst your bubble but that model rifle was not manufactured until 1903 so, it hasn't been passed down for 2 centuries. I suspect you know that but, I just wanted point it out.

Ok, here's what you need to do. Remove the barreled action from the stock and post pictures of the proof marks that will be on the bottom of the barrel, in front of the action. Also take a picture of the tip of the fore end so we can tell if the rifle was made with that stock or was originally a stutzen stock. Without those all I can tell you is what you probably already know; it's a 1903 Mannlicher/Schoenauer in 6.5 X 54 M/S cartridge.

That cocking piece aperture sight is worth at least 1/3 as much as the rifle.
 
  • Like
Reactions: soonerfan66

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Justin, (by the way, that is my youngest son's name), I hope I don't burst your bubble but that model rifle was not manufactured until 1903 so, it hasn't been passed down for 2 centuries. I suspect you know that but, I just wanted point it out.

Ok, here's what you need to do. Remove the barreled action from the stock and post pictures of the proof marks that will be on the bottom of the barrel, in front of the action. Also take a picture of the tip of the fore end so we can tell if the rifle was made with that stock or was originally a stutzen stock. Without those all I can tell you is what you probably already know; it's a 1903 Mannlicher/Schoenauer in 6.5 X 54 M/S cartridge.

That cocking piece aperture sight is worth at least 1/3 as much as the rifle.
Good day sir,

Yes, I am aware that the rifle is not a 1800 rifle, was just trying to give some context in regards to the history and such.

I'll see what i can do and post further pictures pertaining to it. Thank you again for taking the time out of your day to help someone like myself.

Stay Blessed.

Justin
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
Going by the length of the barrel my guess is it came with a Stutzen stock originally. The collector value lost on the stock will be more than made up for by the cocking piece aperture sight as it looks to be factory original. Does it still contain the cleaning rod under the hinge plate in the end of the stock?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,952 Posts
Welcome Justin . I can't help any but you have a very sweet looking rifle and I love hearing the history of guns and especially when it's been in a family and handed down like yours . Will be following this post with interest !
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,985 Posts
Going by the length of the barrel my guess is it came with a Stutzen stock originally. The collector value lost on the stock will be more than made up for by the cocking piece aperture sight as it looks to be factory original. Does it still contain the cleaning rod under the hinge plate in the end of the stock?
That was my thought 9, about the stock. I'd sacrifice my left, little toe for one of those sights.
 
  • Like
Reactions: JustinO

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Going by the length of the barrel my guess is it came with a Stutzen stock originally. The collector value lost on the stock will be more than made up for by the cocking piece aperture sight as it looks to be factory original. Does it still contain the cleaning rod under the hinge plate in the end of the stock?
Hopefully we'll have some light tomorrow so that i can post some of the pictures of what i found. I'm going to be 100% honest here and say that I'm super nervous about removing the barrel to get the proofing stamp, i really dont want to damage the gun or barrel.

In regards to the cleaning rod i dont think its there. I did find some really cool looking items in the butt, so hopefully you guys can help me with them as well.

Stay blessed!

P.S : Thank you to everyone that has replied so far, it's greatly appreciated!

Welcome Justin . I can't help any but you have a very sweet looking rifle and I love hearing the history of guns and especially when it's been in a family and handed down like yours . Will be following this post with interest !
Thank you kindly for showing interest.

Stay blessed!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
340 Posts
I can’t add any value to the conversation but that’s a fine Looking rifle I wouldn’t mind seeing in my gun safe! Take care of it and enjoy it like it was meant to be. Learn as much as you can about the gun and don’t be afraid to use it. That’s what it was meant for.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I can’t add any value to the conversation but that’s a fine Looking rifle I wouldn’t mind seeing in my gun safe! Take care of it and enjoy it like it was meant to be. Learn as much as you can about the gun and don’t be afraid to use it. That’s what it was meant for.
Thank you sir,

Once I learn more about it and not feel like a dummy, only then am I hoping to find it a new home, where it can be used and treated how it's supposed to be.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
If you take it to the range you might get bitten by the old gun bug like rest of us !!!!!
Oh I've shot it before, and I remember exactly what it was like. I learnt how to use this rifle at the age of 7.

However from what I've learnt so far, the bullet are no longer being made or in service. So the three boxes of original ammo that I have must be worth a bit as well. Hoping that someone on here can help me determine a price for those as well, as we move along.

Stay blessed!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,952 Posts
Reloading is the way to go on some calibers cause like you said the ammo is no longer made . That is another illness many of us have !!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Reloading is the way to go on some calibers cause like you said the ammo is no longer made . That is another illness many of us have !!!
Hehehehehe, well I hope my new pictures I'm going to upload tomorrow will peek people interest because I have no idea what they are.

Stay blessed!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,985 Posts
Yes, that ammo is available as factory loads. I believe PPU and Selloir & Beloit both load it. I KNOW, I HAVE BOUGHT IT for my 1903, to get the brass, as I've been reloading since 1963. I don't know if they're available in South Africa but as popular as the 6.5 M/S was in Africa in its heyday, I'd be more surprised if they aren't.

Now, as to removing the barreled action from the stock, if you can operate a screwdriver and have just a little patience it's easy. First, remove the magazine. You do that by taking one of those cartridges and in that hole in the magazine just in front of the trigger guard, put the nose of the bullet in the hole, press and turn the bottom of the magazine one way or the other. Then simply pull up. It should come right out. If using a bullet nose bothers you, any object will work but, using a bullet nose has been recommended by about every military of every country in the world at one time or another.

There is three screws that hold the barreled action to the stock. There is two action screws, one at the rear of the trigger guard and the other at the front of the magazine well. Get a screwdriver that fits the slots and remove them. They are different lengths and you cannot confuse them. There is a screw in the front sling stirrup. It passes through a lug on the barrel. Get a screwdriver that fits the screw slot and remove the screw, the stirrup will slide off the stock. Now, gently nudge the barreled action from the stock. Be patient and don't force anything. It's probably tight but will eventually come loose. It's so easy even a cave man could do it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Yes, that ammo is available as factory loads. I believe PPU and Selloir & Beloit both load it. I KNOW, I HAVE BOUGHT IT for my 1903, to get the brass, as I've been reloading since 1963. I don't know if they're available in South Africa but as popular as the 6.5 M/S was in Africa in its heyday, I'd be more surprised if they aren't.

Now, as to removing the barreled action from the stock, if you can operate a screwdriver and have just a little patience it's easy. First, remove the magazine. You do that by taking one of those cartridges and in that hole in the magazine just in front of the trigger guard, put the nose of the bullet in the hole, press and turn the bottom of the magazine one way or the other. Then simply pull up. It should come right out. If using a bullet nose bothers you, any object will work but, using a bullet nose has been recommended by about every military of every country in the world at one time or another.

There is three screws that hold the barreled action to the stock. There is two action screws, one at the rear of the trigger guard and the other at the front of the magazine well. Get a screwdriver that fits the slots and remove them. They are different lengths and you cannot confuse them. There is a screw in the front sling stirrup. It passes through a lug on the barrel. Get a screwdriver that fits the screw slot and remove the screw, the stirrup will slide off the stock. Now, gently nudge the barreled action from the stock. Be patient and don't force anything. It's probably tight but will eventually come loose. It's so easy even a cave man could do it.
Caveman go do!

chuckles
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Automotive tire Wood Rim Tire Automotive wheel system
Brown Wood Tints and shades Wood stain Varnish
Wood Natural material Tints and shades Hardwood Door
Wood Automotive lighting Bumper Fender Artifact
Wood Tool Font Auto part Close-up
Wood Door Fixture Wood stain Gas
Wood Bicycle part Household hardware Metal Gun accessory
Brown White Light Sleeve Bag
Brown Door Wood Sleeve Collar

Door Wood Tin Household hardware Cylinder


The last screw is a bugger. Like my dad used to say, find the right tools my boy before trying to do the job.

So I'm going to have to try find the right screwdriver for it.

However this is what I've got so far.

And i think I've found the Cleaning rod. I'll have to get it out of the gun safe next time.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,985 Posts
Well done and yes, get a screw stick that fits. Even if the stock has been cut back it's too nice a rifle to bugger up screw heads.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
Very nice so far. If the top screws off of the silver colored cylinder pictured next to the bullet it may contain some cleaning jags for use with the cleaning rod or could be an oiler.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
I looked into buying a replica of your peep sight and price was $500 US dollars. Took me about 18 months to gather dies, a swage die to reduce 358 bullets to 354 and gather load information to be able to build acceptable ammunition for my 9x56MS. The rifle was proofed in Vienna proof house in 1921. I have used it to take both white tailed deer and wild hogs here in US. I can honestly say they are the finest stalking rifles ever made. Good luck with yours and I hope you use it as was intended stalking and taking game.
 
1 - 20 of 36 Posts
Top