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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Very nice so far. If the top screws off of the silver colored cylinder pictured next to the bullet it may contain some cleaning jags for use with the cleaning rod or could be an oiler.
I shook it and it contains what sounds like gunpowder.

I looked into buying a replica of your peep sight and price was $500 US dollars. Took me about 18 months to gather dies, a swage die to reduce 358 bullets to 354 and gather load information to be able to build acceptable ammunition for my 9x56MS. The rifle was proofed in Vienna proof house in 1921. I have used it to take both white tailed deer and wild hogs here in US. I can honestly say they are the finest stalking rifles ever made. Good luck with yours and I hope you use it as was intended stalking and taking game.
Do you mind me asking how much you paid for your 1903 MS?

Im just wanting to make sure that when and IF i sell it i dont get ripped off.

Good job and glad you knew when to stop .
Trying to do this the right way and learn about my Rifle.

Im honestly and truly just glad there are people like yourselves out there willing to help.

Stay blessed, all of you!
 

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I shook it and it contains what sounds like gunpowder.



Do you mind me asking how much you paid for your 1903 MS?

Im just wanting to make sure that when and IF i sell it i dont get ripped off.



Trying to do this the right way and learn about my Rifle.

Im honestly and truly just glad there are people like yourselves out there willing to help.

Stay blessed, all of you!
Mine is actually a model 1905. Someone back in time cut an inch off the stock to shorten the length of pull so I got it trading a Remington 750 in 35 Whelen and $400. I wouldn’t trade or sell it for any amount. It fits me like a tailored suit and shoots where I am looking without even consciously aiming. When they say “they don’t makes like they used to”, these rifles are what they are talking about. Is there a blued nose cap in your gun cabinet stashed away somewhere?
 

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Justin, I believe we're going to need to see the proofs and the front end of the stock before any kind of reasonable estimates can be made. An absolute minimum would be $1,000 American dollars.
 
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Justin, I believe we're going to need to see the proofs and the front end of the stock before any kind of reasonable estimates can be made. An absolute minimum would be $1,000 American dollars.
A picture of the barrel channel of the end of the stock would be helpful. I agree with Sharps $1000 would be minimum.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
A picture of the barrel channel of the end of the stock would be helpful. I agree with Sharps $1000 would be minimum.
I'm seeing a gunsmith tomorrow, so hopefully he can help m with the screw. I havnt found the right screwdriver and honestly i dont want to damage my rifle.

Stay blessed all!

Mine is actually a model 1905. Someone back in time cut an inch off the stock to shorten the length of pull so I got it trading a Remington 750 in 35 Whelen and $400. I wouldn’t trade or sell it for any amount. It fits me like a tailored suit and shoots where I am looking without even consciously aiming. When they say “they don’t makes like they used to”, these rifles are what they are talking about. Is there a blued nose cap in your gun cabinet stashed away somewhere?
I have no idea what you mean when you say Blued nose cap? So pardon my ignorance.

Stay blessed!

Justin, I believe we're going to need to see the proofs and the front end of the stock before any kind of reasonable estimates can be made. An absolute minimum would be $1,000 American dollars.
Seeing a gunsmith tomorrow, so lets hop i have some pics for you guys!
 

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Don't sell it ... pass it down to a Daughter ... if you don't have any children , what about a cousin , how about a nephew or niece !
At least try and keep it in the family . I passed one of mine along to a nephew ... others will go to my daughter and as soon as my great nieces become of age , they are still in grade school , I'll pass some along to them .
The one thing I'm not going to do is sell them to whomever pays me the most money...No Way!
Gary
 

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If your rifle was originally stutzen stocked it would look like this. The "blue nose cap" is the thing at the foremost end of the stock, beneath the front sight. This is my 1908. 9 and I suspect your 1903 has had the stock cut just in front of the sling stirrup. However, perhaps not. My '03 and '08 both have double set triggers and yours has a single trigger. I THINK most of those made with a stock like yours had a single trigger rather than double sets.

Air gun Plant Wood Shotgun Grass
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
If your rifle was originally stutzen stocked it would look like this. The "blue nose cap" is the thing at the foremost end of the stock, beneath the front sight. This is my 1908. 9 and I suspect your 1903 has had the stock cut just in front of the sling stirrup. However, perhaps not. My '03 and '08 both have double set triggers and yours has a single trigger. I THINK most of those made with a stock like yours had a single trigger rather than double sets.

View attachment 266372
Thanks a ton Sir,

Just this picture alone helps me understand more and more of my rifle. I was checking the stock and it doesnt seem to have been cut short, it seems like it was made this way, so perhaps a variant or some sort. Who knows.

Stay blessed!

Don't sell it ... pass it down to a Daughter ... if you don't have any children , what about a cousin , how about a nephew or niece !
At least try and keep it in the family . I passed one of mine along to a nephew ... others will go to my daughter and as soon as my great nieces become of age , they are still in grade school , I'll pass some along to them .
The one thing I'm not going to do is sell them to whomever pays me the most money...No Way!
Gary
My daughter doesnt like guns, she's a proper girly girl, so that puts me between a rock and a hard place. However i'm hoping that with all of this knowledge that is being passed onto me by you guys will help me better understand what I would like to do with it.

Stay blessed.
 

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My daughter doesnt like guns, she's a proper girly girl, so that puts me between a rock and a hard place. However i'm hoping that with all of this knowledge that is being passed onto me by you guys will help me better understand what I would like to do with it.

Stay blessed.
DAD!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
Justin, I believe we're going to need to see the proofs and the front end of the stock before any kind of reasonable estimates can be made. An absolute minimum would be $1,000 American dollars.
Please pardon my ignorance, what will seeing the gun barrel and proof marking achieve. Again, please pardon my ignorance.
 

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When it was proofed, what year, the cartridge, which we already know and, don't forget a picture of the fore end of the stock.
 

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If your rifle was originally stutzen stocked it would look like this. The "blue nose cap" is the thing at the foremost end of the stock, beneath the front sight. This is my 1908. 9 and I suspect your 1903 has had the stock cut just in front of the sling stirrup. However, perhaps not. My '03 and '08 both have double set triggers and yours has a single trigger. I THINK most of those made with a stock like yours had a single trigger rather than double sets.

View attachment 266372
Is 8x56ms still available to purchase? Do you hunt with your idle? It looks well cared for!

When it was proofed, what year, the cartridge, which we already know and, don't forget a picture of the fore end of the stock.
Also when you have it out of the stock measure the length of the barrel from end of the action to end of barrel. I am wondering if it is 17” or 20” doesn’t appear to be 24” which is the normal length of a full length rifle. That is why we think it may have had the stock bobbed off.
 

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I was wondering if there is a recommended retightening/torque sequence as he puts the action back into the stock.
 

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9, my oldest son bought me some 8 x 56 M/S ammo from Buffalo Arms and it was made from 35 Whelen brass. I don't know if anyone loads properly head stamped ammo. It was too hot for my rifle so I pulled the bullets and reduced the charge by 2 grs. After that everything was fine. I made three, 20 round boxes of brass for it from 30-06 and they work fine. As with all my rifles that are amenable to a cast bullet, I have both a jacketed and cast bullet load. Cast sees 98% of the use and the jacketed is there just 'cause.

I do hunt with it but have yet to take anything. It was close to its spot in the rotation this year when I shot a button buck with my 9 X 71 Peterlongo. It is a pretty nice, unmolested 1908.

G-2, I've always simply tightened them snug in no particular order. They're just like any rifle built like a Mauser. Ain't no thing.

On my 1903 it WOULD NOT group beneath about 3 inches at 50 yards. It would shoot two pretty good then start wandering. I finally tracked the problem to the barrel lug for the sling stirrup. As the barrel was warming the bottom of the lug would come into contact with the fore stock. I relieved the wood as much as I dared then took some metal off the bottom of the lug. Groups immediately shrunk to sub 1 inch at 50 yards, open sights. A fella just has to keep looking.
 
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