The Firearms Forum banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello fellow enthusiasts! I inherited the rifle shown in the photos below. It seems to be in fully working order, the action works and the barrel is clear. There's only one marking on it, "1492" stamped on the bottom of the action. Any help in identifying it would be greatly appreciated! Perhaps its some form of the Winchester 92 rifle?
FullSizeRender-4.jpg
FullSizeRender-3.jpg
IMG_1666.JPG
FullSizeRender-1.jpg
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,628 Posts
Double set trigger. Makes for finer release of the trigger that actually trips the sear, firing the rifle. Common on muzzleloaders, early singe shot cartridge rifles and extremely common on German/Austrian rifles from the early 1800's up to WWII.

Target shooting is as good a reason as any.

Glad you ID'ed that Alpo...first rifle in my mind was a Whitney and I didn't think that was right.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,000 Posts
Lever is wrong for a Whitney. It was that sliding loading gate that gave it away.

Set trigger. I'm sure you've heard or read the term "hair trigger". That's a trigger pull SO LIGHT that just the weight of a strand of hair landing on it would fire it. That's basically the purpose of a set trigger.

The normal trigger pull on a hunting rifle should be around five pounds of pressure. A target rifle might be two or three. You don't want the gun to jerk when the trigger breaks (which will happen with a heavy pull), throwing the gun off target.

With a set trigger, you pull the rear trigger and that SETS the first trigger so it is just about to fall, and your five pound pull might now be as light as a half a pound. Just THINK about squeezing it and it fires.

Makes a much more accurate shot at long range possible.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Wow, y’all know your stuff. Very impressive and thanks again! One last question: now what do I do with it? Take it to a gun smith and make sure it’s in firing shape and use it, or keep it preserved because it’s old and valuable?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,453 Posts
Wow, y’all know your stuff. Very impressive and thanks again! One last question: now what do I do with it? Take it to a gun smith and make sure it’s in firing shape and use it, or keep it preserved because it’s old and valuable?
It's your rifle and ultimately your choice, just bear in mind that if it is still safe to shoot it was designed around black powder ammunition and probably should not be fired with modern smokeless ammo. And if you do fire a few black powder or black powder substitute loaded rounds once in a while, the fouling left behind is corrosive, you'll need to make sure you clean and oil it thoroughly the same day you shoot it before storing it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
It's your rifle and ultimately your choice, just bear in mind that if it is still safe to shoot it was designed around black powder ammunition and probably should not be fired with modern smokeless ammo. And if you do fire a few black powder or black powder substitute loaded rounds once in a while, the fouling left behind is corrosive, you'll need to make sure you clean and oil it thoroughly the same day you shoot it before storing it.
Cool. I imagine I’ll just keep it and display it with another antique muzzle loader.

So for displaying it, just make sure it’s lightly oiled?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,510 Posts
I’d shoot it myself but I don’t think I’d have one I couldn’t shoot on purpose. I’d also think with the Cowboy Action guys there should be appropriate ammo available.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,578 Posts
Something to keep in mind is the value. I am no expert on Colts, but your rifle is in pretty nice shape and a quick look around the web tells me that it could be fairly valuable. It isn't a really common gun, and it is collectable. Don't use any harsh cleaners on it or try to refinish it in any way.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,628 Posts
I'd have to load for it, hunt with it and at least shoot it for fun occasionally but......that's what I've been doing the last 35-40 years. Finding old firearms and putting them back to use.

That is a nice looking Burgess and jw is right, it should have significant value.

Alpo, how do you know it's in 44-40? I don't doubt you and besides, I'm poorly versed on the Burgess. Was that the only cartridge they were chambered for?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,000 Posts
That's what the wiki article says. They only made 6500, and they're all 44/40.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,628 Posts
Ahhh...ok. Kinda, sorta limits the choices huh....lol!!!
 
  • Like
Reactions: Kweeksdraw

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,354 Posts
But, just think of all the fun you would get trying to find parts if something brarkes on that over 100 year old rifle. All those nice brittle steel parts and springs. Just saying :mad::mad::mad:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,578 Posts
But they did make a carbine and a rifle, so you do have a choice.....
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,628 Posts
But, just think of all the fun you would get trying to find parts if something brarkes on that over 100 year old rifle. All those nice brittle steel parts and springs. Just saying :mad::mad::mad:
If I worried about that and didn't shoot 100+ year old rifles I wouldn't shoot 2/3 of the rifles in my toy box. Some of them are considerably over 100 yrs. of age.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top