The Firearms Forum banner

1 - 20 of 30 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I had a couple long guns given to me by a friend whos father had passed away. The guns were propped up in the corner of a basement and I'm guessing alot of moisture in said basement. The gun I'm asking about is a New England Firearms Model SB2 Mag 10 gauge. The gun has considerable rust on the barrel with the worst part around the muzzle of the gun. Here are some pictures. Is this gun even salvageable? or should it get tossed? by the way this gun is very heavy weight-wise and barrel is pretty thick walled. Thoughts and advice wanted. Thanks everyone!
240846
240847
240848
240849
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,884 Posts
I’m thinkin’ I’d just clean it as best I could and hang it on a wall. I don’t see much use for a 10 gauge single shot with a cylinder bore.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
163 Posts
The SB2 receiver has some value providing it is not rusted.

If you are in a state where you can sell FTF without requiring an FFL you might get $125 for it complete.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,515 Posts
Yes it’s pitted. But how is the rest of the action? If it locks up tightly it’s not going to explode or anything if you try to fire it. As is it may not pattern properly but as a cylinder bore I’m not sure you’d notice it. I would buy it in a heartbeat for $100-$125 just seeing the pictures. I’m serious.

I have a thing for single shot shotguns. Probably no better representation of a “First Gun for an American.” Even with the pitting you haven’t affected it’s value much. It was never going to be an “investment.” Even in perfect shape they aren’t going to “appreciate” much. They were MEANT to rust in the barn or garage or behind your truck seat or behind your bedroom door and it would probably go boom when you needed it to, whether ridding the farm of pests, putting food on the table or defending your family from scoundrels or a marauding grizzly!

Polish out the pitting in the barrel with an old bore swab with some 1200 or 2400 grit polishing compound on it in a drill and scrub the rest of it with 00 steel wool soaked with oil and I bet you’d have one great “home defense” weapon...😉
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
122 Posts
It is pretty rusted but I would finish it out and use it. There is zero wrong with open choke in 10 gauge for turkeys or whatever out past 40-50 yards. I shoot 3.5 inch in an 870, not low recoil but you have a long and wide shot string, Load it with 2.5 ounces of shot and see how many doves you can hit.....at once.

I would start with light sand paper then go to steel wool and just knock the surface off to a smooth finish. I would then probably brown it rather than blue it. You can buy it at Midway or Brownells or one of the black powder supply stores.

As far as the inside barrel rust, I would shoot it a while and see how much comes out. If you reload just use some wads and no shot cup so the shot contacts the rust, it should knock most of it out. I am a bit extreme, I have been told, but I would even try a few loads with steel shot or BBs to smooth out that rust, lower velocity of course. It is not much different than shooting bullets with lapping compound to smooth out a rifle bore. Then spin that cleaning rod with polishing compound inside the barrel.

But that is just me, it is a 10 gauge, that alone makes the old gun have some class. I also have molds for 0,00, 000 buckshot so I could come up with some pretty interesting loads if you had a herd of zombies or such to shoot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,669 Posts
The receiver looks pretty good to me from the pictures. The outside of the barrel does have rust - but I've seem many old single shots like this MUCH worse that have cleaned up nicely. I like the idea of polishing up the interior of the barrel - provided that it isn't badly pitted. Mild to medium pitting won't hurt a thing - just means that you will need to give a little extra cleaning after firing it.

On firing/testing it - if it were mine I'd use the old 'gun in a tire with a very long string' and the heaviest load you can find to test fire it. I don't think you will have any problems, but better safe than sorry. After that testing to make sure it is safe to shoot I'd stick with light to medium loads just because of the age of it.

Also, if it were mine I'd lightly sand the stock and refinish the stock with a light walnut stain and maybe 4 coats of Tru Oil or Formby's Tounge Oil hand rubbed in. For the barrel I'd use Kroil or WD-40 and maybe start with 400 grit wet or dry sand paper, then go 600 grit and finish up with 1000 grit paper to polish it. Then buff with 0000 steel wool, degrease 3 or 4 times, then apply Super Blue cold bluing (maybe 4 or 5 coats buffing in between with steel wool). Clean and oil 'er up and you should be good to go.

A note on cold blue: it isn't as durable as a professional hot tank blue, but is easier to do at home. Just go easy on the finish when cleaning and oiling in the future so as to not rub it off and keep it lightly oiled..
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
870 Posts
Not a lot to add. +1 with the clean it and use it posts. Lots of ways to deal with the rust and pitting, My preference would be polishing compound and a drill, but any of them would work just as well. I have an NEF SB2 10 gauge that takes choke tubes. Good shooter with light loads. 3.5 inch turkey loads are just too much for this old shoulder.:eek:
 

·
No Power Options
Joined
·
13,342 Posts
If I was going to keep and shoot-Those generally had a 28-30-32 inch barrel. I would cut barrel back 2-3 inches, then have it threaded for screw in chokes. Then you have a solid single that will last many years.
You can always shoot lighter loads in it. I`m a sucker for old single shot shotguns too. Has no collector value so your not going to hurt it, refinish wood and have a sweet versatile single.
Hey....it`s only money. Man what a Turkey buster.
 
1 - 20 of 30 Posts
Top