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Discussion Starter #1
Belongs to my father-in-law, originally belonged to his uncle who was at one time Chief of Police in Ligonier Pa. I know it's a 3rd model and I'm trying to narrow down how old it is. It may be hard to tell in the pic but I believe the letter prefix is a B. A lot of the nickel plating is gone but the pistol
seems to be mechanically sound. I've also included a pic of the box for the
ammo that came with it. $1.65 for 50 rounds! Thanks in advance for any help on dating it.

Iver Johnson Arms & Cycle Works Fitchburg Mass. U. S. A. on barrel
31635 on bottom of trigger guard
B 31635 on left side of backstrap

238862
238863
238864
 

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That is indeed a "B" prefix on the serial number.
Your revolver was made in 1910 which was the 2nd year of production for the 3rd Model Safety Automatics.
DO NOT use that box of ammo!!! Your revolver is chambered in .32S&W which has a lower pressure level than that .32 automatic ammo.
Good news is that the 3rd Model Safety Automatics were designed for use with smokeless powder ammo and .32 S&W is still being made (might be one of the few calibers you can find in stock during these crazy times).
 

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That is indeed a "B" prefix on the serial number.
Your revolver was made in 1910 which was the 2nd year of production for the 3rd Model Safety Automatics.
DO NOT use that box of ammo!!! Your revolver is chambered in .32S&W which has a lower pressure level than that .32 automatic ammo.
Good news is that the 3rd Model Safety Automatics were designed for use with smokeless powder ammo and .32 S&W is still being made (might be one of the few calibers you can find in stock during these crazy times).
It's funny, my brother picked up a 1st Model without knowing much about Iver Johnson and the seller sold him some .32 ACP to fire thru it. I set him straight and gave him some black powder .32 S&W that I reloaded.

I don't know when this practice started, but it is fairly common. I do know that the .327 Federal Mangum is the most versatile caliber because you can fire all. 32's thru it, including the .32 ACP. As far as an Iver Johnson, just because you can doesn't mean you should.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I appreciate the heads ups on the ammo, to be honest I didn't even give a thought to the difference between 32 S&W and 32 auto. Although the ammo in the box is in very good condition with no corrosion I would have probably gotten a new box. I'm going to have a gunsmith give it a going over because I noticed the cylinder has a little bit of play (moves slightly back and forth towards barrel.) I dont know if that's normal in the Ivers or just age and wear.
 
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