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Am always looking at reloading "stuff" and have just found a reloading scale from outside US. It is the Peregrine Monolithics Powder Scale. Just curious to know if any TFF member(s) have one of have experience using one. Peregrine Monolithics claim that it is the most accurate powder scale out there. Would appreciate TFF member comments. Thank you.
 

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Just how accurate do you need to be? 1/10 Gr. 1/100 Gr. 1/1000 Gr. I have been reloading since I could manipulate the lever with my father watching. I once met a fellow reloader who was so anal about a certain load he was developing that he actually counted the number of grains of powder in each case. Not the weight, the powder grains themselves. Since I am a pie plate accuracy kind, I find any load of + or - 1/10 grain is more than accurate enough for 1" MOA at 100 yards. I am not anal enough to be a bench rest shooter looking to 10 bullets in the same hole. I am a meat shooter. If I can consistently hit a 9" pie pan at 100 yards, I can successfully take down any big game in the world.
 

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Have you ever thought about asking a reloading question in the RELOADING FORUM ?
We have one so I moved your question here.
Thank you Shooter45. The reason I posted the thread where I did was to give my inquiry the widest possible exposure. I did add tags which I hoped would help.

Just how accurate do you need to be? 1/10 Gr. 1/100 Gr. 1/1000 Gr. I have been reloading since I could manipulate the lever with my father watching. I once met a fellow reloader who was so anal about a certain load he was developing that he actually counted the number of grains of powder in each case. Not the weight, the powder grains themselves. Since I am a pie plate accuracy kind, I find any load of + or - 1/10 grain is more than accurate enough for 1" MOA at 100 yards. I am not anal enough to be a bench rest shooter looking to 10 bullets in the same hole. I am a meat shooter. If I can consistently hit a 9" pie pan at 100 yards, I can successfully take down any big game in the world.
Thank you for your thoughts, Diamondback.
 

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People have different definitions of "accurate".

All powder scales (that I'm aware of) read to 1/10 grain. Thus it would appear they are all similarly accurate.

But mine reads the same weight to the same tenth of a grain every time. To me, that's accurate. Consistent. If I put 5.3 grains in, it won't tell me 5.2 or 5.4. It will always say 5.3.
 
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I have no idea what scale Alpo has but if he can do exactly the same ever time, wow! Actually even benchrest shooter's I'd guess have scales that measure +/- 1/10 gr. There are a lot of thing's loader's do, all of us, that just aren't necessary to produce good ammo. I guess you'd have to define good. For me it 1" and under at 100 yds. I've got several that will do closer to 1/2" @ 100, but not because I need it. With no better average that that, +/- 1/10 gr makes no difference. Set your scale to one tenth grain and trickle into the pan and look what it amount's to!

About the scale, it's not a brand I'm familiar with so unless it was really inexpensive, I'd pass on it. I tend not to collect a lot of thing's unless something really tripped my trigger. If I was standing around looking at The Mona Lisa and was offered it for $50, I'd pass. My walls are full of kids, grand kids. nephew's ans nieces. And of course if there's not 20 or 30 nice photo's of bird dog's on the wall, your house is not complete!
 

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Mine does the same as Alpo's and any good scale will do it. Mine is an RCBS electronic.
 

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I haven't heard of anyone guaranteeing better than +/- 1/10 grain? I don't pay much attention to electric scale's though, but seem's I did read they too are guaranteed to +/- 1/10 gr. I have no idea how I would check accuracyof my scale, RCBS 505. Maybe I should get another scale to check it against. Then if they differ, which one is right? Maybe a set of those weight's you use to check the electroinc scale. Never gave it a whole lot of though before!
 

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I have three, an RCBS digital electronic, an RCBS beam and a Pacific (Hornaday) beam. I use the electronic almost exclusively now just because it's easy and fast. All three measure to 1/10th grain. I have checked all three against each other. Set up and calibrated correctly, they all measure very consistently.

To the OP's question, I am not familiar with that brand.
 

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About the scale, it's not a brand I'm familiar with so unless it was really inexpensive,
It's a South African company and they have a price tag of $133.95.
https://www.peregrinemonolithics.com/product/peregrine-bullets-scale/
6543

This is the first I've heard of it. From their website it's their claim that their scale is the most accurate. I didn't go looking for reviews.

Precision and accuracy. Two distinct terms. Think of Precision as how small a group you get on the target. My .223 is capable of getting 10 rounds in a 1/2 inch group. My .243 is doing well to get 10 rounds in a 3 inch group. My .223 has better precision than my .243. Now apply that to scales. If you can take the same object and get consistent weights, that scale has good precision.

If your scale is imprecise, it's time to get a new scale.

Now Accuracy. Once you have the precision working on your rounds, you can adjust the scope so your point of impact is the X ring. With scales, you do that by calibrating it with calibration weights. My electronic scale came with 25 gram and a 50 gram calibration weights. I checked them out against balances we have in the laboratory where I work, and they are spot on.

If the calibration weights were off, that would throw the scale calibration off and the scales would be inaccurate.

Before I start any reloading session I power up the scales and check them with some "check weights". These are just three pieces of wire that I've weighed and written down their weights. One is 4.0 grains, another is 8.6 grains, and a third is 26.3 grains. These are the kinds of powder weights I expect to be using. I check all three, regardless of what I'm reloading. As long as these check weights agree with what they are supposed to weigh, I'm good to go. I've set an arbitrary range of +/- 0.1 grain as acceptable, so 3.9-4.1, 26.2-26.4 grains. If they don't fall within that range, I calibrate, then re do the check weights.
 
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