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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have an old long rifle, not to sell, but exploring options for restoration. My be-lated g-pa, dug up this thing, that his mother had burried in their garden many years ago. She was loosing her wits (I was told). She didn't want either of her two sons too have it for some reason????
Anyway it has been in grandparents attic for as long as I can remember. Am interested in restoring, but not really sure what I've got, to be honest. Found initials on barrel. Can anyone help me w identity of gun/maker/etc and possible options and/or direction to consider?
Thanks!!!!
 

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Restoration costs must always be considered in light of what the gun will be worth when it is done...and can you get the costs back out of the rifle if sold later. This rifle is too badly damaged, and moisture has done too much damage to iron parts, to put much money into it. If the gun were a rare rifle showing some important features, perhaps there would be a reason to consider some level of restoration. But this rifle shows little of merit to justify restoration, and the current condition is so poor, that it is not a valid candidate for restoration work. I'd clean it gently, oil the lock to see if there is any chance it can be made to move again, then hang it on the wall as-is and enjoy what is left of it. Shelby Gallien
 

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I agree with the earlier posts. Clean it up a bit--nothing to agressive--and let it rest on a wall--it has seen a hard life. It is too far gone to restore, but has an interesting past. You may want to put a plaque next to it explaining what history you know of it before it is forgotten altogether. It probably began life as a flintlock and then was converted to flintlock at one point in time, which would explain the poor fit of the percussion lockplate, which replaced the flintlock.
 

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Maybe not a restoration project, too much money in my humble opinion, but definitely a refinishing project.

Clean off the rust as best and gently as you can and reblue it. Refinish the wood; be as gentle as you reasonably can be when refinishing as the wood has been compromised from the exposure; this goes for the metal parts too.

Odds are the rifling is completely pitted, so even if you somehow restore it to some form of firing condition it will not be accurate.

Make it presentable and hang it up.

Man...I can feel its history form here! It's your choice if you decide to refinish, or restore, or leave as is, it's your gun, your money, either way I would love to see the results. :D
 

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Maybe not a restoration project, too much money in my humble opinion, but definitely a refinishing project.

Clean off the rust as best and gently as you can and reblue it. Refinish the wood; be as gentle as you reasonably can be when refinishing as the wood has been compromised from the exposure; this goes for the metal parts too.
IMHO, you should leave it as it--wipe it down, lightly oil it, and hang it on the wall. It is NOT restorable. Its value today is solely in the story that its condition tells. The stock has been broken and patched with a copper sheet, the metal is badly pitted. Any attempt to refinish the stock or blue the barrel your will destroy the evidence of its past.
 

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IMHO, you should leave it as it--wipe it down, lightly oil it, and hang it on the wall. It is NOT restorable. Its value today is solely in the story that its condition tells. The stock has been broken and patched with a copper sheet, the metal is badly pitted. Any attempt to refinish the stock or blue the barrel your will destroy the evidence of its past.
I don't think its history will be compromised if he refinishes it, and really, two histories will form: one from where it came from, and the other from the owner taking the time to make it presentable, becoming truly attached to his grandfather's gun. Telling your family members about how you found that beat old gun, and you took the time and effort to give it an image it deserve for the history its gone through; is something I ,personally, would take pride in; but everyone is different, obviously some people won't see eye-to-eye with me on such matters.

To me, having a rusty butchered gun like that is not wall worthy,but, that's my opinion. At the end of the day, it's the owner decision not ours; either choice he makes I will still look forward to seeing the results. :D
 

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Technically a Pennsylvania Long Rifle, yes?? I think Kentucky kinda stole that name. I know, useless info. Sorry. I'll go away now.
 

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I don't think its history will be compromised if he refinishes it,

To me, having a rusty butchered gun like that is not wall worthy,but, that's my opinion. At the end of the day, it's the owner decision not ours; either choice he makes I will still look forward to seeing the results. :D
To refinish that stock is going to take a lot of sanding which will make the metal parts not fit right. The copper patch is IMHO original to when the gun was in use and should be left alone. I can't see why you call it butchered. I think it looks pretty good to have spent years in the ground and more years in an attic.
 

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To refinish that stock is going to take a lot of sanding which will make the metal parts not fit right.
You think so? I don't think it should take whole lot of sanding make it presentable.

The copper patch is IMHO original to when the gun was in use and should be left alone. I can't see why you call it butchered. I think it looks pretty good to have spent years in the ground and more years in an attic.
I didn't say anything about replacing the cooper patch. It's just my opinion. I don't like how rusted and abused it looks,take it for what it is. Besides, the OP has enough sense to decide what he wants to do.

He should be clearly aware now that it's not economic to restore it, and even if he does refinish it, it won't look new, just better. To make it look new you would basically have to restore it; replacing pretty much everything.

EDIT--

So OP, to clarify my position, I would give it a light refinish, like new coat of paint. Others are saying to leave as is;and they seem very adamant about it. Perhaps they might have more experiences on such subjects than I. I'm just telling you what I would do. The last thing I want, is for you take my advice, then it turns out you have to restore it to make it look becoming.

So I'll go ahead agree with the others....clean it and hang it.
 

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So OP, to clarify my position, I would give it a light refinish, like new coat of paint. Others are saying to leave as is;and they seem very adamant about it. Perhaps they might have more experiences on such subjects than I. I'm just telling you what I would do. The last thing I want, is for you take my advice, then it turns out you have to restore it to make it look becoming.

So I'll go ahead agree with the others....clean it and hang it.
Thanks for clarifying your position. The gun is way past being "restorable" and any museum conservator would tell you to leave it as is in "relic" condition. True, the gun really has no value and it would be no great loss if it is ruined by a restoration attempt. But it will always look like someone messed with it--sanding will destroy the patina of the wood as would sanding the metal. While in high school I worked for the curator of the Natural History Museum in Washington, DC. He always counciled me to "let it show its age."
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Gentlemen,
Thanks for the info. I appreciate the honesty.

If money were no object, what would you suggest. I don't mind spending a reasonable amout, if the appearance could be revived considerably. I' m not even thinking of it ever firing again. I am more interested in making my grandmother as well as myself proud of the piece. I understand I will not get my money back out of this project, nor do I have any intentions. It is a family heirloom to me.
Thanks again!!
 

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Gentlemen,
Thanks for the info. I appreciate the honesty.

If money were no object, what would you suggest. I don't mind spending a reasonable amout, if the appearance could be revived considerably. I' m not even thinking of it ever firing again. I am more interested in making my grandmother as well as myself proud of the piece. I understand I will not get my money back out of this project, nor do I have any intentions. It is a family heirloom to me.
Thanks again!!
You could take it to a competent gunsmith, or someone who restores firearms and tell him what you told us, and ask them what it would take to make it look nicer.

Try a Google search and see what comes up.

I did a search pulled this: Ron Gun Shop just choose at random from some the options that came up.

There are a few people on this forum who offer service such as the one you are looking for.

This thread has some of them:
http://www.thefirearmsforum.com/showthread.php?t=118434

I wish I could be of better assistance.:eek:
 

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