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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello fountains of knowledge and experience.
I want a pair of black powder single shot .50 caliber pistols for a a good price and have mostly settled on the Traditions Kentucky Pistol kit in either flintlock or percussion.
It was not easy but I found a place that still has a few flintlock kits for this gun, I think they are out of production.
I like the idea of a kit because I can modify them a bit with butt caps and silver plating.
From my research the percussion model (which is very easy to find in stock) is much more reliable and easier to be accurate with. I have never owner a flintlock so I am not certain.
The flintlock kit comes in at $260 and the percussion kit at $210.
The reliability and lower price is pushing me to the flintlock since I already own a percussion rifle. However, I think the flintlock would be a lot of fun. And the idea of digging up my own flint and making my own powder for complete self sufficiency is appealing.
But I have a few questions before I make the call.

Has anyone here tried these and willing to share their experience?
Can you shoot a flintlock pointed upwards/downwards, or would the powder in the pan fall out if you tried?
Can I bore out the first inch or so of the rifling like a modern cva to ease loading?
Could I load the gun with bird or buckshot or is that a no no for rifled pistols?
These will be mostly for fun, but which would you pick?
I could only find the traditions Kentucky pistol as a sub $300 flintlock kit, do you know any other options and if so where do I look?
What should I do for the barrel/lock? I am going to add a butt cap and silver plate all the brass, I’ll use a deep red to stain the wood, what would compliment that for the barrel and lock? I’m thinking maybe duracoating it to help stave off rust as well.

Any answers or comments would be very appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Check out Track of the Wolf.com and Dixie Gun Works.com .
Both have pistol "kits" as I recall.
Thanks for the tip. I checked both already and Dixie gun works has a few percussion kits I would like to try in future, most of the flintlock kits are more than I want to spend for this project. Same for track of the wolf but they have a smaller selection than Dixie. I appreciate you telling me still though.
 

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The lock is the heart of a flintlock. Be advised, you will definitely get what you pay for. A good lock will be 1/2, or more, the price of those kits.

A GOOD flintlock will fire upside down. Cheapies do well to fire at all without some extra work.
 

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A flintlock can be held upside down and it will fire faster than if you hold it upright. :) You don't want the powder covering the touch hole, that makes it fire slower. Unless you have a lot of wood carving skill forget the butt cap, it won't look right on a Kentucky pistol even if you have the skills to inlet for it. Butt caps are for military or horse pistols and were used for clubbing your adversary in the head if the shot didn't kill him. As to treating the lock and barrel, slow rust brown them and then use boiled linseed oil on them, it will soak in and harden. You could use shot in it but the rifling will scatter the pattern, the pattern will look like a donut, holes all around the outside of the pattern and none in the middle.

The easiest browning solution to use is Laurel Mountain Forge browning solution.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The lock is the heart of a flintlock. Be advised, you will definitely get what you pay for. A good lock will be 1/2, or more, the price of those kits.

A GOOD flintlock will fire upside down. Cheapies do well to fire at all without some extra work.
Hmmmm... that makes me question the $260 kit then. Even if I like the looks of it better, if it doesn’t work it may as be a paperweight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
A flintlock can be held upside down and it will fire faster than if you hold it upright. :) You don't want the powder covering the touch hole, that makes it fire slower. Unless you have a lot of wood carving skill forget the butt cap, it won't look right on a Kentucky pistol even if you have the skills to inlet for it. Butt caps are for military or horse pistols and were used for clubbing your adversary in the head if the shot didn't kill him. As to treating the lock and barrel, slow rust brown them and then use boiled linseed oil on them, it will soak in and harden. You could use shot in it but the rifling will scatter the pattern, the pattern will look like a donut, holes all around the outside of the pattern and none in the middle.

The easiest browning solution to use is Laurel Mountain Forge browning solution.
I really want to make the butt cap though. Clubbing was the main reason why. I am not very good at woodworking myself, but my step father and his step father both are so I can get help from them.
I do not plan on shooting or clubbing anyone obviously, but I like the idea of being able to if I somehow cannot get to any of my modern gun for some insane reason.
 
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