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They have many names. I usually heard them referred to as Queen Anne screw guns. Queen Anne I know nothing about but the barrels screw off to load them. They were also called "muff guns" as ladies would carry them in their muff. I've heard them referred to as boot pistols but they're much too short for a real boot pistol.

The proofs are obviously British.

If it's the same Ketland, he is famous as a lockmaker during the golden age of flintlocks. All I know about Adams as a name is the much later development of the Adams revolver. Entirely possible it's the same family as sons followed fathers into the trade. I would not think it the same individual Adams given the time between flintlock firearms and cartridge revolver.

Individually value is ordinarily never great. A matched pair of flintlock pistols and, if that's the original case, I would think considerably more than one. I don't think you're going to retire off them but they are nice.
 

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For once, I'm not even trying to be funny. Can you elaborate?
Muff. An item women would wear around their waste. It is a tubular form and you would out your hands in each side to keep them warm.
I have one in camo that I use for hunting.

Nevermind, Moody gave a better description.
 

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A gun kept inside the muff - an item of clothing used to keep her hands warm.
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Muff. An item women would wear around their waste. It is a tubular form and you would out your hands in each side to keep them warm.
I have one in camo that I use for hunting.

Nevermind, Moody gave a better description.
Thanks! I genuinely was thinking of a purse, but I've never heard a purse called a "muff," so that didn't make sense. I guess this is a dated term in a lot of ways. @howlnmad, I believe I would have called what you have a "hand warmer." :unsure:
 

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Thanks! I genuinely was thinking of a purse, but I've never heard a purse called a "muff," so that didn't make sense. I guess this is a dated term in a lot of ways. @howlnmad, I believe I would have called what you have a "hand warmer." :unsure:
Not only dated but British, they call a hood of a car a bonnet and the trunk a boot.
They have many names. I usually heard them referred to as Queen Anne screw guns. Queen Anne I know nothing about but the barrels screw off to load them.
The Queen Anne refers to the action type, the lock plate, trigger plate and breech plug are a single piece. Some are screw barrels and others load from the muzzle. On some the cock and frizzen are centered and some are side lock. Percussion guns we generally call box locks instead of Queen Annes.
 

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I guess I'm "dated"....but I like old words....mostly because they actually describe what an item has been called for a few centuries....... :giggle: I honestly wouldn't have thought anyone didn't know what a muff was. No offense intended, just never occurred to me.
 

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In the context of a flintlock firearm....?
 
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Well, it depends on who you ask in 2021. Some may claim to definitely know what it is, even if they're not on the same page with you! :ROFLMAO:
Back when I was a rude and crass teenager, "muff" had a completely different meaning, if you know what I mean, Vern.

I don't think the case is original to the pair of pistols, no provision for the barrel key/turn screw in the case. A turn off pistol would need a barrel key to turn the barrel and sometimes the turn screw ( an archaic word for screwdriver, not a prison guard) for the top jaw would be on the other end of the barrel key. The other accoutrements needed and usually provided space for in a cased set would be a powder flask and a space for the round balls and perhaps a mould. Turn barrels didn't use patches, the powder and ball are loaded into the breech and the ball is larger than bore diameter like a cap n ball revolver. The barrel will have a forcing cone in it.
 

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Back when I was a rude and crass teenager, "muff" had a completely different meaning, if you know what I mean, Vern.

I don't think the case is original to the pair of pistols, no provision for the barrel key/turn screw in the case. A turn off pistol would need a barrel key to turn the barrel and sometimes the turn screw ( an archaic word for screwdriver, not a prison guard) for the top jaw would be on the other end of the barrel key. The other accoutrements needed and usually provided space for in a cased set would be a powder flask and a space for the round balls and perhaps a mould. Turn barrels didn't use patches, the powder and ball are loaded into the breech and the ball is larger than bore diameter like a cap n ball revolver. The barrel will have a forcing cone in it.
I know what you mean by the opening sentence. I was thinking the same but didn't know how to say it.
 

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I know what you mean by the opening sentence. I was thinking the same but didn't know how to say it.
I had to think on it a bit on how to say it without being too vulgar. I ain't been banned yet so I guess I succeded :)
 

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No, not all women carried a pistol in their muff and not all muff pistols were carried in them. Muff pistols were also carried by men in their coat pocket. it's just a name for a small enough pistol that a lady could hide it there if she chose to. Having it in her hand ready to fire would be a lot quicker than rummaging around in a purse in case she was accosted by a ruffian.
 

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I guess I'm stuck a century or two behind times....which I've been accused of on a regular basis....lol!. HOWEVER....I am not so behind the times an alternate definition of "muff" was beyond my ken...... :giggle: It just never occurred to me in the context of the pistols.

Wonder what would happen if I used "grieves" or "buckler"?....lol!
 
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