Knife Sharpening

Discussion in 'Knives & Edged Items' started by dons2346, Oct 25, 2018.

  1. bumblebee

    bumblebee Well-Known Member

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    Knife sharpening is a skill that has been passed down for 10,000 years. I would bet 90% of kids graduating from high school now couldn't sharpen a knife let alone use it to gut, skin and prepare food with it
     
  2. tedwitt

    tedwitt 440 Supporting Member

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    It is a shame too, my kids know these skills. My Father taught me this and I passed it down.
    Grew up in a place called Caseys Ridge just east of New Caney, Tx. When we moved there Sept. 1961 during Hurricane Carla, we were in what at the time was called The Big Thicket. It to us was like a jungle. It was pretty cool to have the freedom to just grow up.
     
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  3. Jack Ryan

    Jack Ryan Well-Known Member

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    When I was about 5 years old, I had a little fingernail kit kind of little thing with a hook for cleaning your finger nails and a little blade about the size of a razor blade that folded out. Kind of thing every place gave away free back then. Dad had his knife out shaving off a wart or something and then flicked off some hair on his arm and grinned. Of course I wanted to do that with my "knife". We were sitting on the back step out side the kitchen screen door. It was a concrete step and a concrete side walk to the barn.

    He showed me how to sharpen that little cuticle trimming blade there on the step. Then when it seemed supper was about ready and that thing was going to be a sliver before it was going to be sharp, he showed me how to rub it on his leather shoe and dang if that little Japanese made trinket didn't shave the hair on your arm. We went in and ate supper.

    That was MY knife sharpening lesson. That is it. All, you got it. Good job, yer on your own now kid. Don't show that to mom.

    Sharpened my own EVERYTHING EVER SINCE.

    Biggest reason these whining crying little sissies can't get a store bought freaking safety razor to shave hair is, ya whiny little cry babies DON'T HAVE A SINGLE HAIR AMONGST THE ALL OF 'EM .
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2018
  4. ms6852

    ms6852 GUNZILLA Supporting Member

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    I wonder where the crossover started? Now they are to busy trying to figure if the genitalia they are born with is what they want and as long as there is a Starbuck that fulfills their world.
     
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  5. tedwitt

    tedwitt 440 Supporting Member

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    My barber lady has a razor blade sharpener, clamp the blade in and turn a crank, it whets that sucker up like new.
     
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  6. Gun Geezer

    Gun Geezer Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    When I was in high school, I took Woodshop the first yr. After the first day of introductions, we were given the key to a drawer in the workbench we were assigned to. In our drawer was a plane iron, 2-chisels, a small tri-square, a block of wood & some sand paper. The chisels & plane iron were not only dull, the cutting edge was ground off flat. The piece of wood was irregularly shaped & varied in thickness. Some of them still had small bits of bark on them.
    The idea was to grind the proper edges on the chisels & plane iron then hone them to a sharpness that would satisfy our instructor. After doing that, we were to plane the board to a specific size, length, width & thickness. It had to be perfectly flat & uniformly thick on all 6 sides & be square enough to satisfy the instructor who would check it with a steel square & measure all the dimensions. If it wasn't satisfactory we would have to keep working with it until we got it right or the piece of wood got too small in which case we had to buy another piece of wood for a dime & begin again.
    Some students took nearly the whole semester just to grind & sharpen their chisels & plane irons. Others never did get past that block of wood which after passing inspection was supposed to be made into a holder for a whet stone. I can still remember my mother shaking the wood shavings from the cuffs of my Levi's. Oh, & at the end of the semester, we had to grind off the edges of the chisels & plane iron so the next class could start from square one. I still have mine from 1957, my brothers from 1956 & my father's who made his at the high school he attended in 1914.
    I can still sharpen a pretty respectable edge on a chisel & plane iron but I can't get a decent edge on a knife blade. Too bad they didn't teach that in high school.
     
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  7. ozdude

    ozdude Well-Known Member

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    Always just used my hands and stones to sharpen knives. If you've got a few knives or get knives (or other things) given to you for sharpening you really need an arsenal of sharpening stones and diamond blocks.
    Cheap kitchen knives ("Can you please sharpen this for me?" "Uhh... ok...") I don't bother with stones as they are usually so battered I'd be there all day, I just run them across the grinder which gives them a nice micro serrated edge that will cut through anything, I can get through a complete kitchen collection in about 5 minutes that way lol.
    Here's one that I recently did for a friend, a very cheap copy of a 152OT that came complete with a fake leather cardboard sheath. It was so dull it required a grind to start with, I even polished the blade for him to get rid of scratches from various sharpening attempts, would not normally have bothered to go to such extends with a $10 knife but had nothing else to do. When I returned it to him he handled it like a hot potato, don't think he had ever seen a sharp knife in all his life.
    sab.jpg
     
  8. tedwitt

    tedwitt 440 Supporting Member

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    Now if you stop and think about it, most of them have no clue who their daddys are to teach them how to do anything on their own. The daddys they have don't know how to do the things our daddys taught us to do too. Society is on a down hill skid.
    I have a 2 stone set I bought about 30 years ago, the main stone is glued to a block of wood, the finishing stone is loose, I am still using the original honing oil that came with the set. I keep them in a Seagram's 7 Bag.
     
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  9. ozdude

    ozdude Well-Known Member

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    I still have the stone my dad taught me how to sharpen with and a piece of tool steel he showed me another method with. I think a lot too has to do with the disposable society mindset, where nothing is ever repaired, maintained, much less cherished, especially by the owners, they just go out and buy a new one. I always say to friends if we get onto those topics that if there was to be some apocalypse, 80% of people would just sit there in shock and die without trying to survive, 19% of infighting and maybe 1% would have enough brains and knowledge to actually have a chance.
     
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  10. ms6852

    ms6852 GUNZILLA Supporting Member

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    @ozdude I use an old 1X4 wooden plank in which I have glued a mouse pad cut to size and than use different grit sand paper on cheaper knives. I just use rubber bands to hold the sand paper in place. 80 grit sand paper does a fast job of things.
     
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  11. ozdude

    ozdude Well-Known Member

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    I also use sand paper ms, in fact I use just about anything, just depends what I'm working on from knives to axes etc; grinders, angle grinders with flap disks, files, files with grit paper wrapped around, stones, diamond stones, you name it. My attitude to sharpening is to get it done as fast as possible while still maintaining a high standard of work. With my own knives, as they are always maintained, I usually use one of my arkansas stones which I have in various grits, or just touch them up on a rod.
    Oh yeah, forgot to mention chainsaws lol, always done by hand with a file, another thing most people are hopeless at sharpening.
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2020
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  12. GeneSC

    GeneSC Well-Known Member

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    I use three different grits of oil stones, then switch to diamond stones with water, then an extremely fine Arkansas stone that I use with water, then on to the leather. I make my knives from 1095 high carbon steel then harden them, believe me, THAT is some HARD steel, but a LOT of patience and a LOT MORE "elbow grease" they finish up "shaving sharp" (Always have four or five band aids on my hands!!)

    (edit) I mis-drilled a pin hole in the one I'm working on and had to re-drill it After it was hardened!! (almost impossible!!) Four drill bits later and a couple of spoonfuls of cutting oil later, finally got the hole drilled)
     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2020
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  13. LIKTOSHOOT

    LIKTOSHOOT No Power Options Supporting Member

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    We all know dull knives are dangerous.
    If it aint sharp, it has no use.
    :D
     
  14. GeneSC

    GeneSC Well-Known Member

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    Yep! if it ain't sharp may as well carry a stick! I don't carry a knife for the simple reason If I get into a confrontation, the opposite party (s) will most certainly have a GUN! Knife is not much good in a gunfight!!
     
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  15. Ozalid

    Ozalid Member

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    I convert all my knives on a belt grinder to a convex edge which I find is easier to sharpen and easier to keep sharp as it lends itself to a stropping method.
    I make up stropping boards which are simple softwood strips around 1.5”x.75”x18” I glue leather from old belts to both sides of the wood and then attach various grades of emery paper over the leather with a simple staple at each end so they can easily be replaced, I also have one board just with the leather which I can use with solvol or some other metal polish to obtain a mirror finish edge if someone wants one.
    Using this convex method means you don’t have to worry about matching the original bevel angle which can be difficult for a beginner. Anyway, that’s how I have done it for many years, it costs very little and works for me.
     
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