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Hello everyone I work at The Georgia Gun Club as an RSO and I do range maintance, we are tested every 6 months, my lead level stays at 7 anything below 10 is considered normal according to OSHIA, reloading can help elevate lead levels in the blood, but it is from ingestion that it gets into your blood. So be careful when handling components and wash your hands with cold water, wipe down your firearms, and yes wash the clothes worn when shooting. If you are casting bullets make sure you have ample fresh air. If you are shooting at indoor ranges they must have huge air circulation and filtering systems, if the range has poor air flow go some where else. Each of our ranges (and we have 3) have at least 40 filters per range and move at least 1000 cuft. of air per minute, doing this all day means safety is no joke.
 

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Welcome to The Firearms Forum, from over here in Athens.

Are you, by chance, Tazz over on ODT?
 

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Thanks for the reminder (and scare tactics). I have been casting lead since my teens; sinkers first and 15 years ago I started casting bullets. I've been reloading for over 30 years, depriming every case I reloaded, and for many years I shot in an older indoor range. I worked in downtown Los Angeles for 25+ years in a heavy construction equipment repair shop (with many chemicals and "pollutants"). I had annual testing which included heavy metals levels in my blood and my levels never got above 9, mostly running around 7.

I have just used common sense , like not chewing on a sinker or bullet as I was casting, not standing over my melting pot doing deep breathing exercises, and often washing my hands after casting or reloading. I believe much of the online "information" from reloaders is way overblown regarding lead poisoning (I believe a new caster would think he would need a full Haz-Mat suit with respirator, welder's gauntlets, full face shield, leather apron, boots, and a fully pressure ventilated area after reading about being "safe" from lead). I have been around lead, guns, reloading, and shooting for 55+ years and have never met anyone with lead poisoning (also never read a factual report/example on any forum, wikipedia, health site, etc.)....

Jes an old shooter, caster, reloader reacting to a post...:rolleyes:
 

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I worked as a welder in a primary lead smelter for over 24 years. My lead levels ranged from high 50's to over 160. I never cast lead for any reason, bullets, sinkers etc. However I was told by company personel that I had high lead levels because I was a reloader. The curiuos thing was that I never felt any different until my blood lead went over 150. I have been retired since 01 and my blood lead is still above 50.
 

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It takes time for the body to get rid of heavy metals. Drink lots of water to help the kidneys and liver get rid of it. Levels at 50 PPM isn't as bad for adults as it would be for children but it is no joke either.

I have since quit dunking my donuts in the smelter to warm them up... OK, That is a joke. Never mix lead with food.
 

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m77user, I worked closely with 3 of the many welders at the City of L.A. DWP, and all had elevated lead levels and none reloaded or cast...
 
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