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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys I'm new to this forum and I just bought a No4 Mk1, but doesn't have any place to identify a manufacturer. I don't know much about Enfield's. I'm just looking for a manufacturer and a date. Also it's not stamed where it's supposed to be on the trigger band. Just has the serial number which is NC2xxxxx. There is also a light etching on the opposite side of the where the bolt handle is.
 

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Very nice Enfield. The receiver ring is normally stamped (just under where the bolt handle closes) with the GR Mark and the date of manufacture. Looks to me like this has been buffed or ground off. I've seen that area worn down to where it's hard to read - but it is entirely gone off yours. At least you know yours was made in England.

A piece of advice: clean and inspect the bore before you shoot it, and remember that most milsurp ammo is corrosive primed. That requires that the corrosive primer residue be completely removed. Regular cleaning solvent won't kill the corrosive salts (unless the bottle tells you that it is formulated to do so). If you only use common bore cleaner the bore will still corrode.

A second note is that if you decide to reload your ammo, I strongly advize only neck sizing vs. full length case sizing. The chambers of most .303s are very large on purpose, and full length case sizing will promote short case life. If you full length size, your cases may only last one or two reloads before they develop a ring or bulge near the case head. I reload with BLC (2) powder and the Hornady 174 grain FMJ bullets for the .303/7.7 Jap to about 2400 Fps. I did this so my ammo shoots to the original sight settings for the original ammo. (It's a good idea to carry a stuck case removal tool in the stock butt trap - I haven't needed it since I went with neck sizing, but it's a comfort to have)

Last chirp: read up on how to load the ammo in the magazine. The .303 is a rimmed cartridge, and if you don't load the rounds into the mag properly it may jam if the top round's rim catches on the rim of the round below it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Where the bolt closes the ring there is a crown with like a P with a Half a C connecting it. There is also an 8. Does that tell anything? Lol this will drive me crazy! Lol
 

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Hang in there, Mustang! There are members who are familiar with more makes of your .303 than am I. If it were me, and with as nice of a rifle as you have, I think I'd look into picking up one of the SMLE collector books. You may be able to determine what that mark is. I've never seen that one.

Most rifles like yours are stamped all over with marks - arsenal marks, proof marks, acceptance marks, property release marks, seems that the English have a love with stamping marks on their property. I'm curious - how does the interior of the barrel look? The exterior certainly has been well cared for.

My manners are slipping - Welcome to TFF!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hang in there, Mustang! There are members who are familiar with more makes of your .303 than am I. If it were me, and with as nice of a rifle as you have, I think I'd look into picking up one of the SMLE collector books. You may be able to determine what that mark is. I've never seen that one.

Most rifles like yours are stamped all over with marks - arsenal marks, proof marks, acceptance marks, property release marks, seems that the English have a love with stamping marks on their property. I'm curious - how does the interior of the barrel look? The exterior certainly has been well cared for.

My manners are slipping - Welcome to TFF!
It's clean as a whistle. The Bore is great. Grooves are still crisp. You put the bullet at the end of the barrel and its showing must of the the round So its definitely not shot out.
 

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A while back I picked up a Number 1 Mark 3, 1916 manufacture date. That was the 4th or 5th SMLE that I'd owned over 40 or 50 years. Coincidentally, I'd just finished reading an article on the British .303 Enfield rifles, and the author had written how "most surplus .303s will be found to have pristine bores because of the British Army's NCOs having been meticulous about ensuring the soldiers maintain their rifles".

Well...... the NCO of the soldier who had mine apparently wasn't very strict. The bore - after I got it home and cleaned it - looked horrible. It was pitted badly from the throat to the muzzle. I ended up firing lapping bullets from Brownells just to get some of the bore back. It is still mildly pitted, but much better than it was. If I had a guess, mine was an actual trench gun from the Great War.
 
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