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Hi.. I'm new here and I recently came in possession of a lefever 410 gauge shotgun. I'm having a lot of trouble finding information on it. I can't find the serial number. The only numbers I can find are only 3 or four digits. I'm still trying to figure out how to post here so hopefully I get the picture up correctly
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Hi Dave,

You posted 3 pictures, all about the same showing the left side of the gun.

What you have is an Ithaca Lefever single barrel break open shotgun made by the Ithaca Gun Company in Ithaca NY. They started with serial number "1" in 1927. So if it's a 3 or 4 digit serial number, you have an early one made the first year in 1927 or in 1928. Production ended on this model around 1942.

There appears to be a stock repair with that screw through the cheeks of the stock.. There is probably a crack in the stock and that screw is helping to hold the stock together.

If that is an early production gun, very likely, it has 2 1/2 inch chambers. If that's the case, do not shoot 3 inch 410 ammo in the gun. With the gun broken down, if "3 INCH CHAMBER" is marked on the barrel flats, 3 inch shells are OK.

A nice, honest original gun in decent condition with no problems would have a value around $400 -$450, maybe a little more. A cracked stock will definitely reduce the value of the gun.

Let us know if you have more questions and if you can post a couple more close up shots, that would be welcomed.

By the way, that's a very pretty pair of pants you have on there.

Jolly
 

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Wow thank you so much for the Speedy reply and massive amount of information. I don't know how that picture came up three times that's kind of weird but I'll definitely post some more pictures. I'm not sure which number is the serial number. I assume it's 3187. And I'm glad you like my pants LOL
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Wow thank you so much for the Speedy reply and massive amount of information. I don't know how that picture came up three times that's kind of weird but I'll definitely post some more pictures. I'm not sure which number is the serial number. I assume it's 3187. And I'm glad you like my pants LOL
Hi Dave,

Yes, the serial number is 3187. First year production gun and very likely it has 2 1/2 inch chambers.

How is the stock at the receiver? Is it cracked.

Year, pretty pants.

Jolly
 

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Pants? Jammies!! Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles to be exact. How cool is that!! ;) ;) :cool::cool:

Looks like that shot gun could use a good scrub job. ;) If it was mine, I'd be looking for a replacement stock or a little work on that one. Should be a fun project.
 

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Just don't clean it very aggressively. Remove only the dirt and crud, NOT the patina. As far as the stock repair, is it just a screw or a thru-bolt? I believe if it were mine I'd take it to a GOOD gunsmith and have him examine the repair. If it's adequate for the 410 I'd leave that alone as well. It's obviously a "period" repair and to make it new would also detract from it. If the repair was poorly done then of course have it corrected. As that screw/bolt appears to be brass I would prefer a new one to be brass as well, as it's easily tarnished.
 
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Usually. But that one is quite ways out of my wheelhouse.
 
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The serial number is 3187. The other 187 numbers are partial numbers to keep the parts together during production.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
The serial number is 3187. The other 187 numbers are partial numbers to keep the parts together during production.
Yeah I kind of figured that seeing how 187 and 3187 are so similar. Being a first-year production low serial number and do you think that would make it worth more?
 

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What's the best way to clean it what do I use? And what about the wood and or the metal

I think I trust you guys more than anything else right now and honestly at first when I found that I planned on selling it because I sell all the random valuable things I get from cleanouts. I do collect a lot of cool antiques but I'm not all that much into modern guns I don't shoot guns but this gun is growing on me and all the information I've learned from watching you guys and doing research is making me kind of want to keep it and start collecting. I never knew how intriguing it could be and this specific gun having no official records kept and the history about the company in the whole mystery and the whole challenge in the research has really attracted me to the world of collecting vintage guns LOL
 

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Just to help you get started, first off, most oil that is good for the metal is bad for the old wood and may soften and damage it. So you can put oil on a rag and wipe and buff the metal. If any parts that move are rusty or built up with crud you can use a toothpick or skewer to clean with. A toothbrush and Q tips are handy. You can out a drop of oil on parts that move but not so much that it will run or drip on the wood. If you can remove the wood you can go all out and spray and flush out the moving parts all you want. Gun oil is proper, but WD40, 3 IN One, or sewing machine oil will work too. Boiled Linseed oil, True Oil, and old fashioned paste wax can seal the stock but may leave it in a glossy condition that is un natural and doesn't fit with the rest of the gun. That can be toned down a bit with a rough fabric like burlap or denim. I have cleaned old stocks with Murphy's Oil soap or naptha (lighter fluid). Because of the repair to you stock it would be best to wait for some more experienced opinions before putting any "treatments" on the wood.
 
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