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Discussion Starter #1
I've been looking for load data on the Internet and printing them up and going to the powder manufactures web sites and requesting load data. Well on some of my load books they mailed me, it gives load data for their powder but unlike my manual they only give a max charge. Since I was told to never go below the starting charge, how do I know what the start is. Like I stated before it only gives max charge. How do you know what's too low?
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Ok I see, sounds good. Thanks. Is it the same if they only give a start ( only go up by 10% ) ?
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Ok cool. That's something I did not know. Another question when you look at the load recipe and see a C next to powder weight. I know it means compressed, but can you explain it a little better. Is it compressed before or during bullet seating? Why would you compress a charge, I mean it looks like a lot powder and if you can get more rounds out of a different powder it makes sense to use the other. Sounds like a waste of powder.
 

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The powder is compressed by the bullet during seating, thus the OAL (the amount of compression) is critical in these loads. As for using compressed loads, it is just a performance thing, in some circumstances they just prove to be the best loads.
 

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ARguy, those are good questions to ask. I'd suggest getting a copy of The ABC's of Reloading. That will explain a lot of questions you may have, and give you some background on the various powders and why to choose one powder over another. There's a lot more involved than just the amount of powder in a charge. Same with primers, and to a lesser degree, brass and bullets.
 

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I try to select a powder that fills the case the most. Now I don't have enough experience to back it up, but I was told and read that in general a powder charge that fills the case is likely to be more accurate than one that only fills it partially. It has worked very good for me so far.

The book, ABC's of Reloading is a good book to read. Lee's Modern Reloading book is a pretty good book as well, it also lists a good selection of load data as well. Lee's book was the first reloading book I bought. I have since bought books from Hornady, and Nosler. I use mostly Hornady and Nosler bullets, and they list loads tested and taylored to their bullets.
 

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IMHO.. I try to get any reloading book i can.. especually any for any projectiles I use. if a powder maker has one.. i get that too.. plus any periodicals like the relaod ing mags..e tc.

more is better..
 

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I'm a big fan of heavily compressed rifle rounds.
Compressed charges are the result of using slow for cartridge powders that require a full case or more to obtain acceptable pressures and performance. This usually results in top velocities with exception accuracy and consistency.

I go a slow as I can go and still get the best performance. That means a lot of powder crunching and often times I must re-seat the bullet after a few days as it creeps out a little. Compressed is good, heavily compress's is better.
 

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When I had my 300wsm, it loved a heavily compressed charge of MagPro. It was an animal with it, but it liked that load and that load only. Wouldn't shoot a boattail bullet for crap, but a 150grn flat base bullet in front of 80.3 grns of magpro lit by a cci mag primer was laser accurate. I tend to find a load that shoots very good and then I stick with it for each particular firearm I have. I said I try to load my cases with a full load of powder, but my 30-30 and 30-06 love BL-C2, and they are not full with it, but shoot great with a broad range of bullets. Another plus with that powder in them is, felt recoil is much lower. Some times I miss my 300wsm, but it was way to picky about what it liked for me.

I lost all of my reloading logs in september 2011 when my basement got flooded, so I am back to working on loads again for my 30-06 after I shot up what I had loaded for it. That taught me another leason about keeping detailed load info with my reload, and not just in my log. It is important to keep good records in at least 2 places. If you loose one, you still have another. The only info I had with my reloads was bullet, date, and load number that coressponded to the number in my log. I now have detailed data with each batch of reloads.

Another thing I try to do is, if I load for 2 different calibers that can use the same powder, I try and find a good load that works well for them using said powder if possible. That is why I use BL-C2 in both my main hunting rifles, it may not be the best for both, but works very good in both. I also see data listed for using it in .223, so you can bet when I get my AR built, I will be working on a load for it using that powder as well. I am also building another AR in 300blackout, and data for it lists H110 as a powder which I use for my 44mag. While I do like to find an ideal load for each, if I can comprimise by using one powder for multiple calibers and get good results, I will. I don't need to keep several different powders on hand by doing this, but keep more of the one powder/s on hand. I can't be the only person that does this, am I?
 

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Hodgdon load data will cover Hodgdon, IMR and winchester powders. Here is a link that will give you min and max loads

http://data.hodgdon.com/main_menu.asp

I dont know what kind of powder your using but you can also find data for ramshot and accurate on line too.

If your starting out it is best to stay away from compressed loads.

Most of the loads you will find will fill the case 80 to 90 percent.

Factory loads are usually in this area also.

As someone mentioned eariler a slower power may be benificial especially in longer bbl rifles to achieve high velocities.

It would help to know what length of bbl your shooting and what cal and what powder you are talking about.
 
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