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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, im looking to start reloading for my new toy. Cimarron Model 1892 rifle .357/.38special. Im pritty much looking for some info or a good website i can research on, tube fed type of rifle on what to and not to do's.
I have all the components to start just lacking info. Lee single stage press, balance beam scale, dippers, and also my 357 mag carbide dies, lee 2nd edition "modern reloading," oh and calipers.
 

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Welcome to TFF and handloading.

Sorry to be short and quick, but I recommend for basics: There is a wealth of info just above in the stickies. You'll want to crimp for tube magazine use. When you decide which bullet you are going to begin with, buy that company's loading manual.

TIP: When using powder dippers, use the same fluid motion through the powder each time IE: place the powder in a bowl and back the scoop down into the powder to fill, and level off with a business card. This will keep loads fairly consistent.

Read, read, read, have fun and stay safe.
 

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100% with what Bob said - AND make sure you use flat nose bullets in that tubular magazene. I'd highly recommend the Lyman reloading manual for two reasons: the forward of the book is chock-full of easy to understand reloading instructions and tips, and Lyman also has data for both jacketed and cast lead bullet loads.

I've been using Lyman manuals for MANY decades. My most recent one is old and due replacement because I've got it so dog-eard from use.
 

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Welcome to the forum from across the pond, roady. You've found the best place for help.

I have a similar .38/.357 lever action--Marlin 1894, which is popular with others in my gun club. After asking around I settled on Titegroup with a 158 grain round nose flat point head. I worked up the load that gave best precision at 25 yards (which is where we do most shooting) and came up with between 3.8-4.2 grains of Titegroup for the .357 load.

As said, there's lots of info in the stickies at the top of this section. Do lots of reading, and if you can, get someone who has been reloading a while to go over your equipment and help you start out.

I'd suggest, if you don't have onealready, get a kinetic bullet puller like this: http://www.midwayusa.com/product/215517/frankford-arsenal-impact-bullet-puller

A lot of people here recommend The ABC's of Reloading as a great book to start out with.

All the best. You are getting ready to get stuck into the third most addicting thing about shooting. The first is shooting; the second is The Firearms Forum; the third is reloading. Have fun and be safe.

Don't be afraid to ask questions here. There are no dumb questions on this forum; we all started once upon a time and it's better to ask and be safe than to not ask and make a tragic mistake.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
just added the lyman 49th edition to my shopping cart and a frankford Arsenal QNeZ Impact bullet puller. My lee carbide bullet seater allows for crimping, but they also make a crimp die that i can purchase. Any thoughts on whether the bullet seater (can crimp with die lightly screwed in and after seated or at same time) is good enough for non tourney shooting or should i invest in a seperate crimping dye.
 

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Welcome to TFF!
You've been given good advice here so far. That's the norm for this place...you've got a good collection of experience handloaders (and gun nuts in general :D) here so feel free to ask any questions you have.
The only stupid question is the one that you don't ask. We were all novices at one point in time too.

Besides the Lyman handbook, I like to suggest the Hornady manual to beginners. It has a very good illustrated explanation of the how's & why's of reloading.

Hodgdon's online reloading manual is another good site to book mark for load data. They have Hodgdon, IMR, and Winchester powders covered since they are the distributor for those three.
http://data.hodgdon.com/main_menu.asp
If you are using Alliant brand powders, they have an online data manual too.
http://www.alliantpowder.com/reloaders/default.aspx
 

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My RCBS seating die allows for crimping. I haven't bothered with a separate crimping die. I use it to put on just a slight crimp. One of my fellow club members pushes the head against a solid surface. If it doesn't go into the case it's tight enough. Too much crimp causes higher initial pressures and can affect precision/accuracy.
 

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roady, for years I just used the seat/crimp die but in the last few years I switched to the separate Lee Factory Crimp Die. The seat/crimp die worked fine but I am often switching from one bullet profile to another and that made it necessary to go through the adjustment process with the one die does both processes. Switching to the separate crimp die made it easier for me to switch around from one bullet profile to another. The seat/crimp die can be a little bothersome setting it up to get the seat depth and crimp you want but once that is accomplished it works fine. So if you are loading the same bullet all the time it may not be much help to go with the separate crimp die. I now use the separate crimp die for all my reloading.
 

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100% with what Bob said - AND make sure you use flat nose bullets in that tubular magazene. I'd highly recommend the Lyman reloading manual for two reasons: the forward of the book is chock-full of easy to understand reloading instructions and tips, and Lyman also has data for both jacketed and cast lead bullet loads.

I've been using Lyman manuals for MANY decades. My most recent one is old and due replacement because I've got it so dog-eard from use.
not trying to be a smart a$$

Lees Modern Reloading 2nd Edition is also full of reloading info, cut away photos of dies, really awesome info for the beginner and also hase data for lead and jacketed bullets
 
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