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*VMBB Senior Chief Of Staff*
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We must not forget that the European conquest and settlement of the Americas were largely dependent on the deadly diseases the settlers brought; or that the grand plan of the Continental Congress to conquer Quebec in 1775 was halted, in large part, by a fearful smallpox outbreak among the troops; or that more American soldiers died from influenza during World War I than from battle wounds, in a pandemic that killed upward of 50 million people worldwide. … Death by epidemic remained a natural, if depressing, part of American life until just a few generations ago. …
The unfettered optimism surrounding the era of Jonas Salk and miracle drugs was understandable, if somewhat premature. The U.S. had recently survived a depression and won a two-front global war. The Atomic Age had dawned. Science and technology were riding high. Nothing now seemed beyond the reach of the laboratory to heal or to prevent. …
There's a reason we're emotionally unprepared for what may lie ahead: We simply haven't experienced the extreme cycles of infectious disease that previous generations were forced to endure. …
History assures us that COVID-19 will be conquered by science and that another virus, originating in a bat cave, a pig farm or an open-air poultry market somewhere in the world, will rise up to take its place. That's the nature of the beast.
David Oshinsky, The Wall Street Journal
 

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My personal opinion is similar to that concerning wars...in addition to disease. War is, and has been, one of two things that spurs the economy and scientific development. Disease is worse than war. It's an unseen killer.

I don't consider myself dumb or stupid but I cannot wrap my head around fighting something I can't see. It's the fear of that unseen speck of whatever it is that could float for miles in a wind since it lives for about an hour they say just hanging in the air. How can you fight something like that?

At least in battle (which I've never personally witnessed) there is a more or less defined (and somewhat visible) enemy. With this virus one could conceivably contract it just driving down the highway behind another car that has an infected person inside it who maybe sneezes out the window.

I expect the worst and hope for the best. But honestly, I don't expect to make it through this unscathed. I have minor chronic lung drainage issues already due to many bouts of serious bronchitis over the years. Just doing my thing and living day to day like I always have. Not taking any special precautions when I go to town, just trying to minimize having to. I got my wife to stop working (she's 62) at the farm store so she won't bring anything home with her. But other than that life is as usual. If God wants me that's His choice not mine.
 

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*VMBB Senior Chief Of Staff*
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26,322 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
My personal opinion is similar to that concerning wars...in addition to disease. War is, and has been, one of two things that spurs the economy and scientific development. Disease is worse than war. It's an unseen killer.

I don't consider myself dumb or stupid but I cannot wrap my head around fighting something I can't see. It's the fear of that unseen speck of whatever it is that could float for miles in a wind since it lives for about an hour they say just hanging in the air. How can you fight something like that?

At least in battle (which I've never personally witnessed) there is a more or less defined (and somewhat visible) enemy. With this virus one could conceivably contract it just driving down the highway behind another car that has an infected person inside it who maybe sneezes out the window.

I expect the worst and hope for the best. But honestly, I don't expect to make it through this unscathed. I have minor chronic lung drainage issues already due to many bouts of serious bronchitis over the years. Just doing my thing and living day to day like I always have. Not taking any special precautions when I go to town, just trying to minimize having to. I got my wife to stop working (she's 62) at the farm store so she won't bring anything home with her. But other than that life is as usual. If God wants me that's His choice not mine.
Good Morning Sir and good wishes for you and yours...Though you seem to have a rather
fatalistic outlook on life, many do so that doesn't single you out..I was born and raised there
in NE Iowa, in and around Manchester...I recall as a boy, before joining the navy, the terrible
toll of polio, especially in the warm, summer season when it was suspected that swimming
in the many creeks and ponds caused it so this young farm boy got whipped many times for
skinny-dipping...Milk cows that would suffer from something called 'masa-titus' and the
laying hens from some disease called 'cock-see-a-dosis', heaven forbid there was enough
frightening things to comply with...your comparison of in battle ...though I never encountered
a Vietnamese enemy face-to-face, I contended with rockets, artillery, and mortars that
arrived, unseen to destroy or maim one...The frightening sound of incoming artillery ...a
sound Hollywood has tried to get right in their action movies but never did...I have witnessed
grown men either dumping this stomachs or their bowels from the fear and fright...Let's
visit about Iowa sometime..lots of my family are buried there...no longer have any kin there.
Used to go to nearby Dyserville a lot from Greeley where I went to school..Field of Dreams
made it a well know little country village..Best Regards, Chief
 

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I do have a fatalistic outlook. I never expected to live long enough to see the age of 30 due to my wild side (fast cars, fast motorcycles, drugs, alcohol, fights, mountain climbing, water sports, you name it, I tried to push each and every envelop to it's max).

Now here I am at 63, suffering every day with the consequences of my active lifestyle which also included heavy construction labor. It still amazes me that I wake each morning (or afternoon since my current job keeps me out all night). My one time favorite auther said >>

Hunter S. Thompson: 'Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming "Wow! What a Ride!',
 
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