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Hi Folks,
Was loading a quick 50 rounds of 308 yesterday - all good, no problems.

Doing another 50 test loads today, batches of 10 differing powerder weights.

first 3 batches of 10 - no problems.

4 rounds into the next batch, it pipes up with Cal 0 - not a problem, instructions say to do it during reloads.

HOWEVER - when i was puching the buttons under the lcd display, it was chaging the powder weight readings, pushing CAL made numbers appear on the screen.

Calibrating the 20g weight, also gave random values when placed back on the scales after zeroing.

I know the scale is very sensitive, but nothing in the room had changed from yesterday.

Anyone know, seen or have an idea of what the problem could be please?

Thanks
 

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Nope...but beam scales NEVER have such difficulties.
 
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sharps4590:

Absolutely right. Beam scales have different problems. They can swing back and forth endlessly, not stop on the same zero every time, and get unknowingly bumped and really screw up the load charge. And they are very slow to use.

Nothing is perfect. Most modern electronics are made in China. The Chinese value money above everything (even family) and will cut corners on electronic components and processes to gain money. It is just the way it is today. The trick is to trust but verify.

I have had a Dillon scale for over 20 years and it works perfectly. Its only problem was zero drift. I zeroed it before every measuring. But I trust my powder measure to drop the same charge within a couple tenth of a grain every time, based on testing I did years ago. So I only use the scale occasionally during a loading session. I recently bought the Hornady digital scale. No more zero drift problems, comes with calibration weights, holds its calibration between reloading sessions, and is easy to use. I also verified its measurements with the Lyman test weight set and it was accurate to a tenth of a grain from 0 to 100 grains. Will it eventually have an electronic failure? Who knows, but it works well for my needs now.

LDBennett
 

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I have never relied on battery power for my digital scales. Both the Dillon and the Hornady come with AC adapters and in my opinion should be used. Battery power is always dodgy.

LDBennett
 
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