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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all
Just picked up a nice M96 Swedish Mauser 1904 with all matching #s. only thing I can see that's been Changed from the original is the bolt handle has been turned down close to the stock (not sticking out horizontal) and the tip of the barrel about a half inch has been shortened. I assume that would not allow a bayonet to be attach again. So that being said my question is how much do those modifications detract from the value of the rifle as a collectors item?
Thanks
Bill
 

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Some of the 96's that came from a shooting club had a turned down bolt.
The barrels were threaded to attach a blank device. Maybe someone cut the threads off
 

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Can you post up some pics? Photos will definitely be needed to help with determining the type and condition to determine a value.
This is the full-length 29" barrel rifle correct?

Is the stock trimmed down on the left side of the action and the action drilled/tapped for a side-mount scope?
It is possible that you've got either an original (doubtful) m/41 or m/41b or an m/96 that was modified here in the states to replicate the m/41 sniper rifle.

Several variants of the Swedes had turned down bolts either from new or from arsenal mods.

The threaded section at the end of most, but not all, Swede barrels is to allow a blank firing adapter not a bayonet. Swedish blanks had wooden bullets and the adapter is a shredder that just blows em apart when they pass through it.
Most likely this is what you're noticing was trimmed off. BUT, there are some Swedes out there that did not have the threaded muzzle and survived an arsenal rebuild or two without getting threaded. I have seen three m/96s in my area that were unthreaded.

If it's a regular m/96 that has been modified like you describe, then the collector value is gone. It's value is just as a shooter even if it's a numbers matching survivor.
Missing wood or furniture can be replaced somewhat easily but once the bolt has been modified and/or the barrel bobbed then it's just a shooter. That's not completely a bad thing though either because they're still sweet little rifles!
 

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Looks like it would be a good shooter but no real collector value left. The bolt does appear to have been modified and is not an M38 bolt (which was downturned) as the profile is different. The muzzle is interesting, nicely done but certainly cut back for some reason. Possibly it was a club gun as one of the importers brought in some a few years ago. Some had had sights modified, bolts altered, etc. As to value it would be hard to figure....won't bring what nice collector grade rifles will, I would guess somewhere around $150 to $200 as a shooter. Might be hard to find a buyer.
 

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Dang, that one is in really good condition yet. Too bad it got modified...but then again I'm guilty of butchering several Swedes (much worse) that were in similar condition. I wasn't concerned about future collector value at the time since I was buying them for under $100 in VeryGood and Excellent condition.


The barrel definitely was bobbed and re-crowned. Even an unthreaded "non-b" barrel should have that little stepped-down 1cm or so in front of the front sight.

The bolt handle should be straight, I've seen a few other bolts modified this way just by the heat-n-bend in similar fashion that came directly from the importers so they weren't modded here in the states.
I'm thinking desi is correct that it was very possibly one of the shooting club rifles imported in years past. Those mods might've been done in Sweden after it's military career was over with. the stock disk shows it's been through one arsenal rebuild (or more properly a check-up since it's still numbers matching) during or after the time Sweden switched from their original 156gr round-nose load to the 139gr Spitzer load.

Here's a quick decoder chart for the stock disk.
The information you are looking for is as follows:
1. "Torpedam" - Refers to the spitzer bullet.
2. Overslag - Point of impact over line of sight (also means estimate)
3.STR or Streck-Mills (1 Mill=1 meter at 1,000 meters=36" inches at 1,000 yards)
4. The largest segment of the circle is stamped for "caliber" of the rifle.
5. The second segment of the disk is the correction you should make to hit the target with the suggested bullet.
6. The final & smallest segment of the disk indicates the condition of the bore. Example: 1-pitting in the grooves 2-pitting in the grooves and on the sides of the lands. 3-pitting is in the whole bore, it's useable barrel and should be re-barreled at next inspection.
Even with those two mods, I'd still value it a bit higher than desi. $250-300 even as a parts rifle. All those parts with near 100% finish and a nice walnut (not hardwood) stock that's not beat-up or stained very badly. I'd hate to be the one to do it but you could get that much or more by parting it out.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Well I guess I didn't do to bad on the purchase price $210
I would never dream of parting it. I was just hoping those mods would turn out to be factory that may have came on a certain variation of the rifle.
So with that bobbed tip I assume I can never attach a bayonet correct?
If that is correct I cannot see why anyone would want to do that.
I believe their was a threaded cap that could be screwed on to cover up those threads?
I have seen pictures of the sniper rifles with these two exact feAtures, the turned down bolt and no threaded tip. But not sure if they made the sniper rifles when this one was produced in 1904. I would like to think it was one of those that never got fitted with a scope! I suppose that could never have happened?
 

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I have one of these on mine. My understanding is they were never issued to the military.

 

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Well I guess I didn't do to bad on the purchase price $210
I would never dream of parting it. I was just hoping those mods would turn out to be factory that may have came on a certain variation of the rifle.
So with that bobbed tip I assume I can never attach a bayonet correct?
If that is correct I cannot see why anyone would want to do that.
I believe their was a threaded cap that could be screwed on to cover up those threads?
I have seen pictures of the sniper rifles with these two exact feAtures, the turned down bolt and no threaded tip. But not sure if they made the sniper rifles when this one was produced in 1904. I would like to think it was one of those that never got fitted with a scope! I suppose that could never have happened?
Yup. Mounting a bayonet is out of the question anymore.
Here's a site that shows how the 1896 pattern bayonet mounts to the rifle. http://www.arms2armor.com/Bayonets/swed1896.htm

There are two versions of m/96 long rifles. The first one had an unthreaded muzzle and is called an "m/96 pattern". The other version had the threaded muzzle to allow adding the blank firing adapter. This version was called the "m/96b pattern". The "b" suffix designated that it has a threaded muzzle.
The "b"s had a little knurled ring that would thread onto the muzzle to protect the threads and that's what the ring on the bayonet would slip over. On the "non-b" style, the bayonet ring would just slip over the muzzle.
This is what the blank firing adapter looks like. http://www.buymilitaria.com/mauser_htm/swedish_mauser_blank_firing_adapter.htm

The later m/38 pattern, and m/96-38 pattern (which were m/96 long rifles shortened up to the 24" barrel m/38 pattern), also had the "b" option. Some had threaded barrels and some did not. Most have the threaded muzzle. I'm not sure why they had the two styles in service at the same time.

The m/41 sniper pattern that you are thinking of (and that I mentioned earlier) was built up from special selected m/96 long rifles and could also be found either "b" or "non-b". I have never heard of one that slipped through getting the conversion completed...minus the scope mount. Doesn't mean that it couldn't exist but it's highly doubtful.
A true m/41 should have the Husquvarna-style bolt handle as seen on an m/38. It was completely reforged with the distinctive flat on the top and won't be the bent in the middle style like your bolt handle is.

There have been several of the US importers and distributors that did make replicas of the m/41s from standard m/96s. Sarco is one of the biggest houses that did these "fake snipers". Most every one that I've seen has had the heat-n-bend handle too unless it's a parts rifle and has a Husky bolt handle.

As to why that barrel was bobbed...
Only the good lord and the guy that cut it knows. It might've been to recrown a banged up muzzle. Several of the Swedes and other surplus Mausers that I worked on did come from the distributor with boogered up rifling but never bad enough that I had to trim that much off.


Regardless, you've got a very nice looking shooter on your hands. I'd buy em looking like that for $120 all day long!
Hope you enjoy it as much as I enjoy my Swedes. They are just a blast to shoot whether they're stock or sporterized.


I have one of these on mine. My understanding is they were never issued to the military.
You're right, those flash hiders aren't original Swede accessories. They were made up by the importers here in the states as a fancy doo-dad to screw onto the muzzle threads.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Well I guess all my questions have been answered on this subject. Thank you all for the replies. I have learned a great deal from all of your post.
Bill
 
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