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Will these bullets (details below) be safe in a bolt-action rifle? (.243WIN: Magnum Primers CCI#250)

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Hey, I am new to reloading, and I wanted some insight on a mistake I made.
I loaded a batch of .243 Winchester with:
41.0 gr of IMR 4831
Hornady 100 gr BTSP
Winchester Brass (new)

But I accidentally loaded them with magnum primers (CCI #250). (I'm stupid, I know.)

Will these be safe to use in a bolt-action rifle? Or do I need to scrap them?

Thanks.
 

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I do not load .243, but my humble opinion is pull them down. With 41.0 grains of 4831 being pretty close to max load according to the Hornady # 10 manual. Then you add a Magnum primer and you are not going to know what kind of pressure you are going to get. If you had used the minimum powder load, then I would have probably had a different answer.
 

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It states in the newest Hornady manual: "Under no circumstances should one switch to a magnum primer with a load developed with standard primer."

If it was mine, I'd pull the bullets and reload 'em. Primers and powder are cheap. Mind you I do play things by the book, especially when it come to my or others safety. I am anal about it, but I still have all my fingers and eyes...
 

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I do not load .243, but my humble opinion is pull them down. With 41.0 grains of 4831 being pretty close to max load according to the Hornady # 10 manual. Then you add a Magnum primer and you are not going to know what kind of pressure you are going to get. If you had used the minimum powder load, then I would have probably had a different answer.
I agree. Checked three different manuals...max load with that bullet ranged from 40.0 to 42.5 with standard rifle primers. The manuals build in a safety factor, and a modern bolt action is strong, but you are flirting with the limit. You didn't mention the size of the batch, but I'd pull them and be on the safe side.
 

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I ran out of Small Rifle Primers a couple of weeks ago and will use some of the 10,000 Magnum primers that I have. I will NOT use the same loads that I developed for my rifles. I will start over with ladder testing for each rifle, heck, I am actually looking forward to it!:D:D:D
 

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This is an unknown combination, or rather Hodgdon did not document this combination on their website. You are wise to take them apart.

My rule of thumb is that if I have any doubts, I take the bullet apart and remake it. That's a lot cheaper than hospital bills, missing appendages and other injuries, and KB'd guns.

You can reuse the bullets, and since you know what powder you were using, you could probably recycle that as well. You will need to ditch the primers.
 

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There were only 20 rounds because it was my first batch,
By first batch, do you mean that this is the first batch of 243 that you loaded, the first batch that you loaded with that bullet and powder combination, or the first batch that you loaded with that bullet, powder, and magnum primer combination?

I am trying to determine whether you worked up a load with standard primers or just started with a load that was near max.
 

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Well, I’m going to go the opposite direction of everyone else. I use magnum primers in every cartridge I load, from 222 rem to 416 Taylor. I’ve seen pressure traces that showed magnum primers REDUCING pressures in some cartridges compared to standard primers. Primers aren’t created equal. Just because the box claims they’re magnums, that doesn’t necessarily mean they’re “hotter” than other brands of standard primers. In some cases it’s the complete opposite.
I would definitely shoot those without hesitation, however, I would check some other manuals and start at a minimum charge.
According to Hodgdon, your load falls about mid range.
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Since you’re new to reloading, remember to always start at the minimum charge and work up in 1/2gr increments with 3-5 rounds at each charge weight.
Don’t rush just to get rounds loaded. Take your time, pay attention and double check your work.
 

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I’ve seen pressure traces that showed magnum primers REDUCING pressures in some cartridges compared to standard primers. Primers aren’t created equal. Just because the box claims they’re magnums, that doesn’t necessarily mean they’re “hotter” than other brands of standard primers. In some cases it’s the complete opposite.


Since you’re new to reloading, remember to always start at the minimum charge and work up in
In other words, there is no way to know what they will do. That is all the more reason to back off and work up a load with the components that are going to be used.

Starting off by loading rounds that are, according to a post above, above max in some data sets and near max in others while using Magnum primers could be a little more exciting than a beginning loader wants. Magnum primers are fine in most cases if they are used to work up a load. It does not seem as if this loader worked up a load with those primers.

I am unclear about whether he even worked up a load with standard primers. If he did work up a load with standard primers and stated seeing pressure signs above 41 grains, he has no way of knowing what adding the magnum primers might do. If he did not work up a load with standard primers, those 20 rounds need to be pulled so he can work up a load with standard primers. Either way those rounds should not be shot. They might be fine, but could be, might, not necessarily, and sometimes can get you hurt.
 

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In other words, there is no way to know what they will do. That is all the more reason to back off and work up a load with the components that are going to be used.

Starting off by loading rounds that are, according to a post above, above max in some data sets and near max in others while using Magnum primers could be a little more exciting than a beginning loader wants. Magnum primers are fine in most cases if they are used to work up a load. It does not seem as if this loader worked up a load with those primers.

I am unclear about whether he even worked up a load with standard primers. If he did work up a load with standard primers and stated seeing pressure signs above 41 grains, he has no way of knowing what adding the magnum primers might do. If he did not work up a load with standard primers, those 20 rounds need to be pulled so he can work up a load with standard primers. Either way those rounds should not be shot. They might be fine, but could be, might, not necessarily, and sometimes can get you hurt.
No, it doesn’t seem that that charge weight was worked up to. That’s why I suggested holding off on pulling them down just yet and loading some rounds at minimum and working up to it.
4831 is a fairly slow burning powder. According to the Hodgdon data I posted, the pressure at their max charge is 50,800psi. The max pressure for the 243 is 60,000psi.
 

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agreed with the others. had you developed the load from the bottom with a mag primer it might be different, or if this was a starting load, etc.

pull the projectiles, then either dump and re-use the powder as is, after de and re priming, or dump all the powder, and re charge at a starting load with the mag primers.
 

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At the very least, I would pull the bullets and reload with starting loads using the magnum primers (but I've been reloading for quite a while and can tell when a load is too much)...

When I deal with new reloaders I make a few suggestions; find a load in your reloading manual before you buy components. Make a list of the load, including all components and powder charge. Take the list to your bench and keep it in plain view (I taped mine to my powder measure). Assemble all components on your bench, only the ones listed, no others. Before starting double check components (I know a feller that reads the labels out loud). Refer to the list during the process, double checking the scale and powder measure weights/charges (I have had scale poises "jump" .2-.3 grains heavy from removing and replacing the pan).

All this may sound unnecessary and tedious, but I have never installed the wrong primers in any load and all the powder charges were/are consistent in my 35 years reloading...

Go slow, double check everything, and most important, have fun...
 

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The way I see it, you have 2 options. You can pull them down and save the components or you can start with the minimum load, with magnum primers, and work your way up to what your current load is. I would not fire them, unless you work your way up to the load, looking for signs of excess pressure.
 

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Hey, I am new to reloading, and I wanted some insight on a mistake I made.
I loaded a batch of .243 Winchester with:
41.0 gr of IMR 4831
Hornady 100 gr BTSP
Winchester Brass (new)

But I accidentally loaded them with magnum primers (CCI #250). (I'm stupid, I know.)

Will these be safe to use in a bolt-action rifle? Or do I need to scrap them?

Thanks.
Accidently? Didn't mention that in the poll. In all likelyhood they may spike pressure on you but I doubt they will blow upyour rifle. To used them from the start just start low and work up. I've used them in 243 loads with H414 powder. I've also used standard primer's with the same powder. Only difference I found was the mag primer's were more accurate but, that may be just this one rifle. How close to max are you with your load? If your at max I think I'd pull the bullet's and back the load down then work my way back up. Or easier, just pull about five of them and move down from where your at 1/2gr at a time and pressure test them. Could be you'll be alright.
 

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I wouldn't scrap the primers, I'd just reload the cases with the start load and work it from there. I've had to do this with 30-06 and 22-250 with no problems. Load a few test rounds at each powder load beginning with the start load and working up in .5 grain increments.
I bought a miss marked case of LRMP's and couldn't see dumping 1000 primers and I don't have or know anyone close who reloads for large magnum rifles.
After working up the load I noted it in the notes section of my manual. I know others on other boards who have done the same thing.
 
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