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This gun is a Mannlicher Schoenauer Model 1903, made by Styer of Austria. It comes with the original Kahles scope and also the original strap (which is rare I believe).
It is marked M1903 and the gun number is 24285.
The bullet for the gun is 6.5mm X 54mm, 160 grns. It is the more appreciated sporting (non-military) model.
An indication of value would be appreciated.
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riflle markings 1.jpg
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rif1-rs.jpg rif2-rs.jpg riflle markings 1.jpg riflle markings 3.jpg riflle markings 4.jpg
 

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This gun is a Mannlicher Schoenauer Model 1903, made by Styer of Austria
It's not made by Steyr, it's made by "Oestereichische Waffenfabriks-Gesellschaft Steyr". Steyr ist a town in Austria.
Before anybody can tax a value for this gut, it must be shown the proof marks on barrel and system.
The front mounting ring of the scope is damaged and must be checked.
 

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Will have a look for the proof markings - where would I find them exactly (this is my father's gun, not mine)
The scope is not damaged or the mount for it.
The foresight (at the end of the barrel) is clipped a bit - an easy repair I understand.
 

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don't want to damage the gun by taking the barrel mechanism out of the wooden casing so won't be able to show proof markings. it's a genuine gun.
 

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Removing the stock, which happens to be a normal/common occurrence when thoroughly cleaning or drying and oiling the weapon, will somehow damage the rifle?:confused:
 
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I'm not a gun enthusiast so obviously am not familiar with same. This was a gun of my fathers. I took out the screws but don't want to force it. I wonder will I get any mention of possible value which would be helpful and appreciated.
 

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Michael, no one is avoiding trying to help you. Examining the proofs is a common request on any German, Austrian or British vintage rifle. For those who have learned to interpret them there is a lot of valuable information therein. I understand your trepidation of not wanting to take down the rifle if you're unfamiliar with the process, wise decision I think. However, without seeing them only a rough estimate can be made.

Any original Mannlicher/Schoenauer is a desirable rifle and of the 4 early models the 1903 is perhaps the most desirable because ammo is still readily available. Having the original sling adds little, if any. Yours appears to be the rifle rather than the carbine. The only question I would have is, has the fore end of the stock been cut? Many were full length "Mannlicher" stocks. However, they were made both ways and I cannot tell which yours was or is. A range of prices could be from around $1250.00 to perhaps as high as $2500.00 depending on the condition of the bore and the rest of the rifle. It's really impossible to say without a personal examination.
 
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I think the full length stock ("Stutzen") was cut to a half stock, of course the take down version looks others on the sling for the strap. You can compare on the picture.
Halbschaft und Stutzen MS 1903.jpg
 

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@sharps4590, it makes perfect sense what you have explained. thank you for taking the time to do so. my father doesn't think that it's a carbine that was cut but as you say it's the markings that can confirm/deny this. I will get my dad to help take out the parts to find these markings when I can.

@Marblekonus - thanks for uploading the comparison. Are you saying that the gun that I have appears to you to be a carbine / fullstock that was cut?
 

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Both the rifles and the carbines had the full stock but not all. Marble is saying he thinks the full stock, "Stutzen", has been cut on your rifle. I don't believe the proofs will tell you whether or not the rifle once had a full stock. One way to perhaps learn that is to examine the bottom of the barrel, beneath the front sight. If there is some circumferential blue wear there that appears it might have been caused by the steel fore end cap of the stock bearing on the bottom and around the barrel it's about positive evidence it was once a "Stutzen" stocked rifle. Other clues could be linear blue wear along the sides of the barrel or on the bottom to the rearward from the rear sight or forward of the current fore end tip. If a person knows what they're looking at a mere glance at the fore end tip will also tell.

Once more I'm grateful to Marble for the correct word for the full stock, "Stutzen". As soon as I read it I remembered but man....learning the German language as related to firearms has been a long process and one I will never master.
 
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This gun is a Mannlicher Schoenauer Model 1903, made by Styer of Austria. It comes with the original Kahles scope and also the original strap (which is rare I believe).
It is marked M1903 and the gun number is 24285.
The bullet for the gun is 6.5mm X 54mm, 160 grns. It is the more appreciated sporting (non-military) model.
An indication of value would be appreciated. View attachment 114300 View attachment 114301 View attachment 114300 View attachment 114301 View attachment 114302 View attachment 114303 View attachment 114304 View attachment 114300 View attachment 114301 View attachment 114302 View attachment 114303 View attachment 114304

Both Marblekonus and Sharps 4590 are knowledgeable regarding Mannlicher Schoenauer rifles and carbines.

Removing the barreled action will reveal the Austrian proof house markings which consist of a multi digit number, a 'dot,' then two more digits which are the date the rifle was 'proofed' (tested at maximum load to ensure safety), as all commercially manufactured firearms are. My M1910, for instance, has the proof number XXXXX.22, which means it was proofed in 1922.

The fact that your receiver ring is marked 'MADE IN AUSTRIA' dates its manufacture to 1925-1938.

The barrels came in various length, as did stocks.

As long as you are careful, disassembly should not harm your rifle. Do, however, use properly fitting screwdrivers to avoid damage to the screw slots (collectors like them straight, clean and virginal). Remove the bolt and Schoenauer magazine prior to disassembly. You cannot separate the 'action' from the stock without removing the magazine.

The round knob at the left rear of the receiver releases the bolt. Press it and slide bolt straight out the rear. Press a bullet tip (or back end of pencil, small dowel...) in the front 'hole' of the plate in front of your trigger guard (on bottom of receiver). Turn the cover plate clockwise (as viewed from the bottom) 90 degrees, pull out of action. Past that, ask Sharps4590 as mine is a 'takedown' model (pull a pin, flip a lever, barreled action lifts out of stock).

Mine can be seen in the 'avatar' to the left of this post. My Grandfather is at center holding the M1910 Takedown.
Johnny's Cat 001.jpg



Search the term, mannlicher on this site and you will find photos that I and others have posted of MS rifles and carbines.

For value, Sharps is right as best as one can tell with the info. presented. Go to auction sites and you'll get 'real world' examples. What you have is one of the finest firearms ever produced.

Another 'site that you may find very useful is the (Australian based) Nitro Express.Com .
MS Exploded NRA Guide.jpg

MS 6.5 1903.jpg

This is the 'Takedown' version.
MS Steyr-1929-Pic1.jpg

MS WUM ad.jpg


The Magazine, removed.
MS IMG_2074.jpg
 

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Roth is right about using a correct fitting screwdriver. It's a bit more of a challenge on German, British and Austrian rifles because they cut such thin screw slots. You may have to grind or file one to fit.

From where Roth finished the take down instructions continue by removing the front, sling stirrup screw and sling stirrup. Note from which direction the screw enters the stock. In front of the trigger guard will be a fairly good sized screw head, remove that. I'm not looking at my M/S but I believe there is a wood screw at the rear of the trigger guard tang. Remove that and the trigger guard should lift out. Beneath the guard is another screw similar to the front screw, remove it. The barreled action is now ready to lift from the stock. As old as it is it will probably be tight, just be careful and work it slowly and it will eventually lift out. Note the front and rear action screws are different length. Keep them straight as to which goes where and you'll be fine. Assemble in reverse order.

The Schoenauer rotary magazine has to be the finest magazine ever designed, manufactured and installed on a bolt rifle and, except for the split, rear receiver bridge and the smallish recoil lug I'd take a Mannlicher action over about any other. Of course that's a matter of taste but oh do I like them!!!!!
 
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@sharps4590, it makes perfect sense what you have explained. thank you for taking the time to do so. my father doesn't think that it's a carbine that was cut but as you say it's the markings that can confirm/deny this. I will get my dad to help take out the parts to find these markings when I can.

@Marblekonus - thanks for uploading the comparison. Are you saying that the gun that I have appears to you to be a carbine / fullstock that was cut?
Michael,

Could you provide better photos of the stock forend? If that is a metal forend cap on a 'half stocked' Mannlicher Schoenauer, I see why Marblekonus suspects alteration. It wouldn't belong there.

Full stocked MS carbines had a steel end cap, 'half stocked' MS rifles and carbines did not.
MS fullstock forend.jpg

MS Stoeger 1940.jpg

Stoeger catalog, 1940. Note that rifle and 'take down model' have rounded wood forend.
Stocks are in one piece, no added sections, spacers, seams.


There were custom makers who used Mannlicher 'actions' with their own stocks. Yours, however, looks to be a 'factory' MS by your photos.
MS Haenel.jpg


Many long arms brought back as WW2 'souvenirs' by U.S. servicemen suffered the indignity of a 'duffel bag cut,' with the stock sawn to fit in the regulation bag, closed. Others have merely been damaged, altered, etc... .
Duffel Cut Gew 98.jpg
'Duffel cut'

More and bettter photographs (better light, clear focus) would help solve the riddle.

As bad as a cut forend would be, at least your buttplate looks (from what I can see) to be original, and that's a good thing. Many have been cut off and replaced with 'recoil pads', making originals valuable and desirable. If yours has a 'trap door' revealing three holes when opened (two for 'back up rounds' and one for cleaning rods), it's proper. If there is a set of original cleaning rods within, better yet.


BR.
 
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