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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Finding interesting firearms in my neighborhood never happens for me. So, I have been taking some risks with internet buys and largely they have paid off. At minimum I am happy with my purchases, and I have been ecstatic about one or two. This latest investment came via Cabela’s gun library where I have been having some luck. But, has my luck run out? I guess the answer is subjective.

I took a chance on a not so expensive, old looking Mauser that has been all dolled up with fancy engraving. Going into this deal I was sure of a few things. 1.) The stock is not original and exhibits poor fitment, 2.) The bolt looks like a takeoff from another rifle after the original was lost, and 3.) The cartridges will be very difficult, perhaps impossible to find. Those facts I am fine with, and having my curiosity peaked by the engraving including names of people and German cities, chambered in an obscure caliber, and a favorable price was enough for me to just have fun with the gun and its mysteries. I ordered it up from Cabela’s Nebraska and had it delivered to Bass Pro in Pearland, Texas for me to pick up. I live in the Houston area.

Here is the information that I have, and pictures are attached to illustrate the details.
The rifle is chambered for 5.6x61mm Von Hofe Super Express. Wikipedia states that this round was based on the 6.5x55mm Swede.

The name K. Barthelmes, (of) Zella-Mehlis is engraved on the left side of the receiver.

The name Bruno Halbach (of) Aachen is stamped/engraved on top of the barrel.

Engravings of oak leaves and animals appears to have been finely executed.

I have found very little information about the rifle. Do you have information about the gun? Advanced thanks for sharing your knowledge.

Dennis
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The bolt handle, appears to be period correct and I do agree that it has been restocked.
Quite the nice cartridge and can be made from the 6.5X55 cases.
 

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Pull it from the stock and take pictures of the proof marks.

The engraving is fairly typical for the era and not uncommon and as is normal, quite well done. Oak leaf patterns were often favored by the Germans whereas the British like a tight, scroll pattern. Most pre-war German sporters exhibited at least some engraving.

I'm going to go out on a limb a little and bet that rifle originally had set triggers.

It looks to me as if the front, claw mount base was in the receiver ring at one time. Bear in mind, 3 bases are not uncommon, for two different scopes so, it might have been simply filled....or not. and a 3rd one added farther up on the barrel. I have a Wilhelm Brenneke with bases similar to what you have now. It would take just the right scope and a very expensive set of claw rings.

I'll refrain from comment about the stock other than to say, you're right.
 

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Pull it from the stock and take pictures of the proof marks.

The engraving is fairly typical for the era and not uncommon and as is normal, quite well done. Oak leaf patterns were often favored by the Germans whereas the British like a tight, scroll pattern. Most pre-war German sporters exhibited at least some engraving.

I'm going to go out on a limb a little and bet that rifle originally had set triggers.

It looks to me as if the front, claw mount base was in the receiver ring at one time. Bear in mind, 3 bases are not uncommon, for two different scopes so, it might have been simply filled....or not. and a 3rd one added farther up on the barrel. I have a Wilhelm Brenneke with bases similar to what you have now. It would take just the right scope and a very expensive set of claw rings.

I'll refrain from comment about the stock other than to say, you're right.
Good eye. I missed that one. (trigger)
An unmodified trigger would sit center in the trigger guard
An improved trigger would be set farther back in the guard.
That leaves the possibility of once having a double set trigger system, which would fit perfectly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Pull it from the stock and take pictures of the proof marks.

The engraving is fairly typical for the era and not uncommon and as is normal, quite well done. Oak leaf patterns were often favored by the Germans whereas the British like a tight, scroll pattern. Most pre-war German sporters exhibited at least some engraving.

I'm going to go out on a limb a little and bet that rifle originally had set triggers.

It looks to me as if the front, claw mount base was in the receiver ring at one time. Bear in mind, 3 bases are not uncommon, for two different scopes so, it might have been simply filled....or not. and a 3rd one added farther up on the barrel. I have a Wilhelm Brenneke with bases similar to what you have now. It would take just the right scope and a very expensive set of claw rings.

I'll refrain from comment about the stock other than to say, you're right.
Here are some proof marks.

Dennis
 

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The stamps on the bottom of the receiver flat are merely mechanics marks.

The rest don't tell me anymore than you already know.
 
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