Mauser bolt disassembly question

Discussion in 'Technical Questions & Information' started by Corey Hayes, Dec 10, 2015.

  1. Corey Hayes

    Corey Hayes New Member

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    I received a family heirloom mause r 98k that was supposed to have been brought back from the battlefields by my great grandfather after he took it off a German. I was trying to clean the bolt as the gun hasn't been taken care of in years and failed to turn the safety up before turning the rear counter clock wise. Now it seems to be setting in a grove and I can not turn it either way, even when pushing on the pin. I also failed to cock the firing pin back. So it is visible. Any way to fix this bolt or did I take it out of commission.
     
  2. Firpo

    Firpo Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    Oops, that stinks. I know there is a solution but can't remember what it was. Someone will be along that can tell you what to do.

    Good Luck
     

  3. nmckenzie

    nmckenzie Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    If the bolt's uncocked, you should be able to hook the cocking piece leg (the portion that engages the sear) over the edge of a table, bench or whatever, push forward on the bolt so the cocking piece (and firing pin with it) are moving to the rear, then flip the safety up into the mid-position to hold the cocking piece to the rear. You can then either rotate the entire firing pin and sleeve assembly out of the bolt, or by turning it clockwise (assuming the bolt face is pointing away from you) reseat the firing pin assembly into the bolt.

    P.S. You'll probably have to push in on the bolt sleeve lock plunger - spring loaded on the left side of the bolt sleeve - in order to rotate the firing pin assembly the last little bit into fully locked position.
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2015
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  4. Firpo

    Firpo Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    See I knew it.

    Good one Mac. I think that's the only mistake I haven't made......yet
     
  5. grcsat

    grcsat Well-Known Member

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    Well said. You beat me to it while I was typing.
     
  6. LDBennett

    LDBennett Well-Known Member

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    Corey Hayes:
    Here’s a question about your Mauser K-98 and the stories of WWII Mausers returned to America by American WWII soldiers:

    The first question is…Do all the parts have the same serial numbers on them?

    If not then the rifle came through Russia as “Capture” rifles. The Russian intermixed parts between guns such that no rifle has totally matching parts. A gun in this state probably did not come back with a soldier but was one sold on the US commercial market some time after WWII.

    If all match except the bolt then the rifle was returned on an American Naval vessel by a returning soldier. Seems the Navy did not want active guns on-board their ships without control over them. So they made each soldier with one of these guns remove the bolt and give it to a designated Navy guy for safe keeping. They supposedly stored all the bolts together and when the soldier left the ship he got the next bolt in the box (not the correctly number one).

    If all the numbers match then the gun might have been imported after WWII or the gun was hidden from the Navy guys on the ship (??).

    These are the stories collector tell al the time. I often wonder if they are true, especially the mixed up bolts story.



    LDBennett