The Firearms Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a Remington Model 722 in 222 caliber. I have been thinking about cutting the barrell down and putting a sythenic stock on it. Would this be ruining a classic?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,427 Posts
I don't know about spoiling a classic, but what possible reason could you have for wanting to ruin a good rifle by cutting the barrel down? If the crown is damaged have it recrowned. Remington manufactured the rifle with the proper length of barrel for optimal performance (I hope). Cutting the barrel down may completely destroy the accuracy. Especially if you do not have the proper equipment. Why bubba a perfectly good firearm.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,258 Posts
I was looking to lighten the load of carrying it up the montain.
If you switch stocks you'd probably shave off a pound or so, but cutting the barrel would only drop the weight by several ounces, and you'd ruin the originality of the rifle (I'm assuming you'd be keeping the original stock). I don't know what 722s in good condition are bringing these days, but I'd imagine dollar-wise the closer to factory original the better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,379 Posts
I am wondering what kind of game on a mountain would be hunted with a .222, which I would think more suitable to flat country varmints.

Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,041 Posts
222 is an awesome round for accuracy...... mind you I wouldn't hunt anything bigger than medium deer with it. Varmints of all sizes.. yes. ****, coyotee, etc. I might shoot a ferral pig.. but if it was over 150# I'd be ready for another shot fast.. can't see taking big game.

I have a rem 700 in 222 and 223 they are both tack drivers.. I can't imagine cutting the bbl down. if 2# is an issue.. maybee change the stock, and um.. wear lighter clothing and carry less gear.. but not less gun...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,588 Posts
Another couple things that might hang up your synthetic stock swap is the bolt handle and the rear sight.
The old 721/722/725 has a straight bolt handle while the 700 is swept back. A short-action 700 stock will fit but you'll have to do some work to the bolt handle relief groove to fit the stock to the bolt.
I believe all of the 721/722s had the band-style rear sight. You'll need to inlet the stock for this too.
I don't know of any aftermarket stocks for the 721/722 quirks so at least these two mods will be on the list. I'm not sure about the bottom metal...I've never tried swapping 700 and 721/722 floorplates so I don't know for sure if there are any differences.

As for bobbing the barrel, I'll have to agree with Diamondback. Unless you're drastically shortening the thing up you aren't gaining much weight savings. and if you bob too short then you'll start losing muzzle velocity. I would shorten enough to recrown if it's damaged but otherwise I'd probably leave the tube alone. If you do shorten the barrel and muck up the crown it is possible that you'll take an accurate barrel and turn it into an inaccurate one.
Is your 722 a 24" or 26"?

Around my area, there really isn't a big collector following for the 721/722/725. Prices are right on par with a similar condition 700. If it's a really mint condition piece then it would be worth a bit of a premium, but if it's any lesser condition I don't think modifying would be considered "ruining a classic". If it is any higher grade (premier, peerless, special, etc) than the standard, I would hold off modifying it also. The collectors do prefer the higher grades and that will up the value too.

I don't want to steer you away from modding your rifle into something that suits your needs but it might be more economic to start with another rifle that is more setup for your needs. A Model 7 in .223 perhaps sounds pretty much identical to what you're proposing to build with your 722.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,379 Posts
You will lose velocity in any case, 50-75 fps per inch. That is always a tradeoff for convenience when barrel length is involved.

Jim
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top