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model 90

Discussion in 'The Ask the Pros & What's It Worth? Forum' started by okie, Apr 30, 2009.

  1. okie

    okie New Member

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    Hi all, new to the forum, I have a mod 90 .22 long rifle. Ser # 772,118 i think thats right on the #'s. all I have seen is mod 90 in .22 short, .22 WRF & .22 long. Can anyone tell me the year this gun was made. Thank You.
     
  2. Alpo

    Alpo Well-Known Member

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    That number is outside the database.

    "Actual production of guns reached serial number 752,044. After 1932 serial numbers were chosen at random; many numbers were skipped and the highest serial number recorded is 849,100. George Watrous, a Winchester employee, counted total production at 764,215 in 1944 when he made a count."
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2009

  3. okie

    okie New Member

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    so sometime after 1944 , right
     
  4. Alpo

    Alpo Well-Known Member

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    Nope. I started to answer you, and then realized that I did not, exactly, understand what that paragraph I quoted meant (and the more often I read it, the less I understood it). So I wrote a feller I know that is a big-time 1890 collector. This is his response. I high-lighted the paragraph of his response that pertains to you.

    >No one really knows the exact answers to these questions.
    Winchester Model 1890's were counted by their RECEIVER Serial number.

    The records show that receiver counts stopped on January 4, 1927 at number 736,486. This does not mean that production stopped then, because we all know that there are gun with numbers over 800,000.

    Production of parts was supposedly ended in the range of 1932. The odd and loose parts continued from then up till 1941. This was the beginning of the war and that probably created the stoppage.

    Remember that winchester made parts and stored (used) them in bins (barrels, boxes etc.) If a bin was half full, and new parts came in they may have been put in on top of the others thus distroying any sequential order order of things. Also, if an inspector send a part or parts back for rework or, polishing etc. it probably changed it's order and could have sat on a shelf for years trying to get fixed....so there is no ABSOLUTE way to know, tell of understand. The only way to determine an individual gun is to review the Records from the Cody Museum in Cody WY where "some" of the records are.
    They are not complete on every gun and some are more detailed than others, the odd and fancy guns, are often highlighted more than the plain guns and even then some of them are not recorded at all. Remember the old saying about not buying a car, made on Monday>>>>>I'm sure some guy in the warehouse was known to miss a few records when nobody was looking and so it goes.

    Based on my best GUESS, I would say your Pard's gun was probably made in the span between 1940-1941.

    Many of the guns in the "Clean-Up phase" had odd parts on them. Different triggers, barrels, stocks, some round from 61's, 62's, 62-A's, etc. Also different springs, inside, and just about anything they could piece together to make another gun.
    I hope this answers your question, if not ask another one.
    But next time, call me as I hate typing long answers.<

    So, there you go. '40 or '41, most probably.
     
  5. okie

    okie New Member

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    Thanks to all.