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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all,
Once again I come to my fellow gun enthusiasts for some advice. A buddy of mine just gave me a Mosin that needs a serious bit of cleaning and care. He found it in an old building that was about to get demolished. It is missing the bolt and is covered with rust. My concern is the bore, I shined a light down the bore and you can barely see the rifling through all of the corrosion. As much as I would like to get this thing back into firing condition, the bore corrosion concerns me. What are some of the finer aspects of cleaning up corrosion of this degree to the point where this is an operable rifle once again? I was thinking of submerging it in an electrolysis tank for a day to see how that fared but I am unsure.
It has the Soviet crest on the receiver with the year 1933 under the crest. There is also a Triangle with an arrow in the middle. There are other markings all over the receiver but I will not be able to see what they are until I dig into this rust.
Thank you for any advice you can give me. I seem to have a habit of finding rifles that need tlc which doesn't bother me except that this one is the worst one yet.
 

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A plain old bronze cleaning brush will do the trick . ( don't forget the bore solvent :) )
If the bore is any good, then the next question is ,is it worth while fixing and getting it into a safe shooting condition.
Only you can answer that question because we are all different and we will all place a different value on a Soviet rifle. I personally would brake it down into parts and sell those parts at a later date or even use those parts should you come across anther rifle in better condition that could use those scavanged parts.
No matter what you do, good luck.
 

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I think giving the bore a bit of a scrubbing with a bore brush you don't care about to knock out the major crud first might be a good idea. If the bore still looks like a 100 year old sewer pipe after, you'll know it's probably not worth chasing.
 

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A bit of copper pot scrubber on the cleaning rod slotted tip will get the heavy crud out. Then plug the muzzle end of the bore, fill with a good bore cleaner, let stand muzzledown a few hours. Then swab her out again. Once the swabs are coming out fairly clean, use a light and check the bore. Some light pitting won't affect accuracy.
 

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A lot depends on just how badly the rifling is damaged. The cleaning methods above are all great, but I think I can add a little more. Once you get past the gunk and goo in the barrel, you may wish to try copious amounts of JB Bore Paste and plenty of patches. It will take a few days or even weeks to get past the corrosion.

Assuming that you don't have damaged rifling and only medium pitting, a final step would be 'bore lapping bullets' to finish (as best as you can) cleaning up that bore. These are fairly simple to use if you are a reloader. Midway used to sell them, and all you do is load them to mild or medium velocities. As I recall, you fire one, clean the bore with a brush and solvent, then dry the bore and fire more of those bullets using the same 'fire and clean' process.

I bought an old 1916 SMLE .303 with a horrible bore. As stated above - the bore looked like an old sewer pipe. I cleaned the bore with those fire lapping bullets, and while there is still some 'frost' in the bore, it looks, shoots and cleans much better now. I finished the process with Sweets copper bore solvent and more JB Bore Paste.

You will never find and original numbers matching bolt, but you can find a 'correct' bolt and put the rifle back into serviceable order. These rifles aren't really high dollar collector guns, but you can have a shootable rifle that you can be proud of. Doing it is half the fun.
 

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Don't use electrolysis on the bore. It will pull everything out of the pits and could possibly ruin it as a shooter. I did a Chinese Type 53 and it put every round through the target sideways at 25 yards. If I had just shot it and cleaned it hot it probably would have at least been a decent shooter instead I ended up with a textbook example of a sewer-pipe bore. I have a spare magazine assembly and some interrupter springs if you need.
 

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The barrel marked 1933, is either one of the last of the Hex receiver rifles made, or that's the barrel date when it was rebuilt from a Model 91 to a 91/30. Look on the bottom rear of the tang for the actual manufacture date and arsenal.
Another way to do a rusty gun:

Edit to add: A Mosin bolt from any year, make, or model of Mosin, has a 99.9% chance of head spacing. Tested 12 different rifles each, with 12 different bolts, and all were in spec.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Upon disassembling the rifle, all of parts which were concealed by the stock looked to be in great condition. Gives me some hope. Just trying to soak some kroil on these really rusty areas to get the pins and screws out. there are numerous other markings under the stock. I will try to get some photos uploaded later tonight after work.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
The barrel marked 1933, is either one of the last of the Hex receiver rifles made, or that's the barrel date when it was rebuilt from a Model 91 to a 91/30. Look on the bottom rear of the tang for the actual manufacture date and arsenal.
Another way to do a rusty gun:

Edit to add: A Mosin bolt from any year, make, or model of Mosin, has a 99.9% chance of head spacing. Tested 12 different rifles each, with 12 different bolts, and all were in spec.
You are correct. 1933 actual manufacture date. There are a couple other marks on the parts such as: a star stamped on the trigger, a "pitchfork" like stamp on the barrel closest to the receiver under the stock, and others which I am unsure of how to describe.
 

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The year stamp under the receiver tsng is the original date of manufacture. The year stamped on the barrel ring is likely later, from the refurb.
 

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You are correct. 1933 actual manufacture date. There are a couple other marks on the parts such as: a star stamped on the trigger, a "pitchfork" like stamp on the barrel closest to the receiver under the stock, and others which I am unsure of how to describe.
With clear closeup pictures, you would not have to worry about describing them.
 

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I've seen worse guns turn out to be fine shooters one refinished.
I doubt the rifle has any real collectors value, so if it were me I would Duracoat it rather than reblue. The main advantage being they have a filler/primer that would conceal the pitting. It's a two part epoxy finish that is very durable, and can be easily applied at home. They even have colors to mimic the original bluing. The other advantage is it will never rust again.
While you are at it you may want to modify the front sight. Those guns were originally zeroed at about 300 yards with ammo that was anything but a "flat shooter". With the stock front sight and the rear sight in it's lowest position it will shoot about 12 inches high at 100 yards. A higher front post fixes that right up.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I've seen worse guns turn out to be fine shooters one refinished.
I doubt the rifle has any real collectors value, so if it were me I would Duracoat it rather than reblue. The main advantage being they have a filler/primer that would conceal the pitting. It's a two part epoxy finish that is very durable, and can be easily applied at home. They even have colors to mimic the original bluing. The other advantage is it will never rust again.
While you are at it you may want to modify the front sight. Those guns were originally zeroed at about 300 yards with ammo that was anything but a "flat shooter". With the stock front sight and the rear sight in it's lowest position it will shoot about 12 inches high at 100 yards. A higher front post fixes that right up.
Would you be able to recommend a way to modify the front site or do you know of an aftermarket site that will suffice? I appreciate the Duracoat advice, I will do that instead.
 

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Best trick ever for the front sight.
Heat Shrink tubing from the auto parts store. Pick a color that works the best for you. Slip it over the sight post, hit it with heat, and it's staying there until you cut and pull it off. Leave it longer than the post, snip off tiny pieces until the rifle shoots to the point of aim elevation. If you screw up and cut to much, takes about 5 mins to replace it. I found white or red to be the the easiest to see in my sight picture, your mileage may vary.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Best trick ever for the front sight.
Heat Shrink tubing from the auto parts store. Pick a color that works the best for you. Slip it over the sight post, hit it with heat, and it's staying there until you cut and pull it off. Leave it longer than the post, snip off tiny pieces until the rifle shoots to the point of aim elevation. If you screw up and cut to much, takes about 5 mins to replace it. I found white or red to be the the easiest to see in my sight picture, your mileage may vary.
That is genius. Definitely the cheapest and easiest option. Thank you.
 
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