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Discussion Starter #1
I'm shopping for a muzzle brake that I'm gunna buy and then give to the gunsmith to thread my barrel and install. But there are so many brakes, different kinds and looks. How can you know if your buying a brake that works? Anyone can write a review. I'm down to 3 breaks I think.

1.. http://www.deltabrake.com/

2.. http://wittmachine.net/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=65&products_id=182&zenid=h2oeempr3sn2i3qloa0jubekv2

3.. http://kahntrol.com/

Each one comes in both forms clamp on and threaded, I'm going with the 5/8 24 threads. I just don't want to buy one that doesn't work or does what it's suppose to do. So how can you pick a good one?
 

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That's a good question and hopefully you'll get some good answers because I'd sure like to know the same thing. I'd like to add a side question - would a compensator be better than flash hider or is there something that is both?
 

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Those are all clamp on no gunsmith required brakes. Since you have someone threading the barrel, the options open up. The best brakes Ive delt with for the money are shrewds. They are concentric so no clocking. i've put them on several 300 win mags and 7mm rem mags with good success in recoil reduction. If you like the directional type then dont leave out JP Enterprise. Good stuff and a good look.
 

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I've tried a 7 mag with a shrewd and I gotta agree with Helix-it's a very nice improvement.

One thing it did though was made the rifle very loud- you cannot shoot it without ear protection. Not an issue at the range, but in the field it may be.
 

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To AR guy, in addition to the private message I sent you, something else to consider. The rifle I spoke of in the p/m had a reputable scope with an ultra fine cross hair reticle. I put the gun away after fireing a single shot through it, and a few weeks later took it out of the safe for a another range session(more shots were planned for this outing). I removed the lens caps to look through the scope and the horizontal cross hair had broken and was dangling and curled up. A couple of friends that I shoot with regularly said it was because of the reverse recoil effect that muzzle brakes have on rifles when fireing. I think there is a lot of truth to what they told me. For years I've heard of scopes being used on hard recoiling guns with no effect on them. When the same type of scope gets put on guns like a spring piston air rifle(they have a reverse recoil effect) it destroys them in a few shots. One shot doesn't prove or disprove the rumor/theory, but it's something to consider. The scope I mention was replaced under warranty and placed on a milder recoiling rifle with no muzzle brake and to date has had no additional problems.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
All those muzzle brakes I put up come in both kinds, threads and clamp on. What exactly is a shrewd muzzle brake. Are the ones I posted up shrewd?
 

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My personal favorites are VIAS brakes and Precision Armament M11 brakes. The PA brake is a .30 cal only brake but could be bored to larger calibers. Threads are 5/8X24. Its also a prone brake so you wont end up with a face full of dirt if you shoot laying on the ground. Recoil reduction turns a .308 into a .223.
 

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My personal favorites are VIAS brakes and Precision Armament M11 brakes. The PA brake is a .30 cal only brake but could be bored to larger calibers. Threads are 5/8X24. Its also a prone brake so you wont end up with a face full of dirt if you shoot laying on the ground. Recoil reduction turns a .308 into a .223.
OK - so I can see the point of reducing recoil on a .308 to the recoil of a .223 so, what would be the point of reducing the recoil on a .223 then at all?

Of the 3 long guns I now have, my Marlin 30/30 doesn't give much kick. My .303 lets you know you shot it and my 12 gauge shotgun would make my .303 feel like firing my Ruger 10/22 (which my daughter now has for a while).

So, with this in mind, why would I need a break on the AR that I'm building in .223? OK - a flash hider then makes sense rather than some kind of recoil compensator.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
OK - so I can see the point of reducing recoil on a .308 to the recoil of a .223 so, what would be the point of reducing the recoil on a .223 then at all?

Of the 3 long guns I now have, my Marlin 30/30 doesn't give much kick. My .303 lets you know you shot it and my 12 gauge shotgun would make my .303 feel like firing my Ruger 10/22 (which my daughter now has for a while).

So, with this in mind, why would I need a break on the AR that I'm building in .223? OK - a flash hider then makes sense rather than some kind of recoil compensator.
I would say, you don't need a brake on a AR. I think its used just for looks. If something looks intimidating you might think twice about doing what you have in mind. That's my guess anyway. And some brakes stop the upward motion when you rapid fire. Those are the only reasons I can think of.
 

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I have a Miculek on my rifle. Not that .223 kicks a lot, but my braked Savage let's you keep your eye on the target during and after the shot, for a nice follow through when looking through the scope. For rapid fire, a muzzle brake on an AR15 makes perfect sense.
And of course, makes em look cooler :cool:
 

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AR guy - brakes that reduce upward motion are compensators. The concept behind them is that the gasses following the bullet leaving the barrel are re-directed upwards and that compensates the physical upward motion of the barrel by pushing it back downwards. Elementary physics.

Flash hiders are specific in that those same gasses are vented in multiple directions to reduce the muzzle flash from those burning gasses leaving the barrel.

Both devices are brakes because they redirect the gasses and that does have an effect on the velocity for the bullet that leaves the barrel. With the degree of velocity change comes a degree of less recoil. With me so far?

So, I can see the reason for a compensator on a fully automatic AR or any fully automatic rifle - help keep the barrel down and on target. The actual physics that cause the barrel to rise is the the spin on the bullet (i.e. the twist rate) - change the rifling to the other direction and the barrel would go down not up. I think that the concept of rifling a barrel must have been invented in the northern hemisphere by right handed people.

Flash hiders are useful in that when you fire at an enemy in the dark, they don't see the muzzle flash to shoot back at you - that is the concept.

Granted, both devices do 'look cool' but they have very different functions.
 

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The actual physics that cause the barrel to rise is the the spin on the bullet (i.e. the twist rate) - change the rifling to the other direction and the barrel would go down not up. I think that the concept of rifling a barrel must have been invented in the northern hemisphere by right handed people.
Everything you said was great but this... I'm not so sure about. I believe there are a few guns out there that have rifling in the opposite direction. Just has to do with the manufacturer's method of machining the barrel.

As for muzzle rise, that's because the barrel is on a different plane than the grip and stock/ forearm. The leverage of it pushing back, and then rising because of the grip/weight being underneath. Since an AR has the barrel inline with the stock, recoil mostly goes straight back. A more traditional rifle with the stock having a bend and comb in it gives it a rotating force on the grip part, making the muzzle rise
 

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For the most part the reason for a break on a ar is to get back on target faster. many of the people that i know that shoot 3 gun have them for that exact reason, not recoil management. schrewd is a brand name. brownells has them in many sizes.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
well i gotta say this topic has taught me alot. i did not really know a simple little device at the end of the barrel had so much to learn about. thanks all for all the good info. im a little ignorant in some areas.
 

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New member here. I have "good iron brakes" from smith enterprises on an sks and also an ak74 that I like very well. They make them for an ar15 especially, which is the one I threaded for the ak 74. I used the bigger same style brake for the sks. I like them both.
If you want some other style with more suppression, check out surefires.
 

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For the most part the reason for a break on a ar is to get back on target faster. many of the people that i know that shoot 3 gun have them for that exact reason, not recoil management. schrewd is a brand name. brownells has them in many sizes.
Well in order to get back on target/ remain on target, you need to manage recoil because the recoil of the rifle is what throws you off target
 

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AR guy - brakes that reduce upward motion are compensators. The concept behind them is that the gasses following the bullet leaving the barrel are re-directed upwards and that compensates the physical upward motion of the barrel by pushing it back downwards. Elementary physics.

Flash hiders are specific in that those same gasses are vented in multiple directions to reduce the muzzle flash from those burning gasses leaving the barrel.

Both devices are brakes because they redirect the gasses and that does have an effect on the velocity for the bullet that leaves the barrel. With the degree of velocity change comes a degree of less recoil. With me so far?

So, I can see the reason for a compensator on a fully automatic AR or any fully automatic rifle - help keep the barrel down and on target. The actual physics that cause the barrel to rise is the the spin on the bullet (i.e. the twist rate) - change the rifling to the other direction and the barrel would go down not up. I think that the concept of rifling a barrel must have been invented in the northern hemisphere by right handed people.

Flash hiders are useful in that when you fire at an enemy in the dark, they don't see the muzzle flash to shoot back at you - that is the concept.

Granted, both devices do 'look cool' but they have very different functions.
Everything you said was great but this... I'm not so sure about. I believe there are a few guns out there that have rifling in the opposite direction. Just has to do with the manufacturer's method of machining the barrel.

As for muzzle rise, that's because the barrel is on a different plane than the grip and stock/ forearm. The leverage of it pushing back, and then rising because of the grip/weight being underneath. Since an AR has the barrel inline with the stock, recoil mostly goes straight back. A more traditional rifle with the stock having a bend and comb in it gives it a rotating force on the grip part, making the muzzle rise
Spot on Alb.

Will, your very own .303 brit enfield has left hand pitch rifling, so do 1911 .45s.

All of them flip muzzle up. because its simply the path of least resistance. The recoil force of the bullet being accelerated generally pushes straight back against the muzzle as the bullet exits. The shape of the stock and its relative position to the bore effect how the shooter perceives recoil forces.

Muzzle brakes work by catching the expelled gasses and acting as a stop for them which, since the brake is attached to the rifle and the gasses are moving away from the rifle, when they hit the brake the energy of the gasses moving away is transferred at precisely the same moment the recoil forces are shoving the rifle toward the shooter and they cancel each other out. This is why higher pressure rounds generally get more out of the same brake as a lower pressure round. Take a .45/70 firing a 300 gr bullet at 2000 fps. the recoil generated is unpleasant even from a brake because the expelled gasses aren't sufficient enough to drastically reduce the recoil force. take the same style brake and put it on a .338 lapua that propels a 300 gr bullet at 2800 fps. recoil is much more manageable because the higher pressure gasses cancel out much more of the recoil force when they hit the brake.

Compensators work by propelling expelled gasses in a specific direction to counter muzzle flip, which again, all guns have. They are best noticed thru rapid fire or full auto fire, as its easier to keep the gun on target.
 
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