The Firearms Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hey everyone. Here`s another one of my rifles. It`s a no5 mk1 and from what I can find on it all of the serial numbers (bolt, receiver, magazine, and stock) match and it was never FTR'd due to lack of that mark. It`s a POF (F) rifle so it`s one of about 160,000 made and it dates to February of 1945. I think I paid about $650 for it a few months back and I think I might have overpaid but seeing how hard an original is to find nowadays that price could be a good one in a few years. Any thoughts on it?
P.S. sorry if my pictures are real big. my camera loves to zoom in on stuff.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,393 Posts
Can't really tell much from the pictures posted, but seems to be in pretty good shape. I am assuming a good bore and all original matching parts with most finish intact.

Now on to the hard part. I think you are asking if you made a wise investment for a resale. From my humble experiances with Number 5s in general, as well as a number of Enfield type rifles, I'd say $650 is up towards the top price wise. That being said, if you bought it to make a ton of money you'll need to keep it a while longer. If you bought it because the rifle appealed to you, I'd say congradulations on a nice rifle.

I've some experiance shooting these Carbines. I've found them not to be quite as accurate as the long rifles, especially in prolonged shooting sessions. They are fun to shoot, and yours should group under 2" at 100 yards with decent surplus .303 ammo, and better with good reloads. As far as reloads, I'd say to neck size only because the .303 is brutal on reloaded brass, and neck sizing will make the brass last longer and giver better results in THAT rifle. Hornady makes a great 174 grain FMJ bullet, and I've has good results with Blc (2) powder. Have fun!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I`ll try my best with it. Down south rarer guns like a no5 tend to be priced a little higher than usual just because they don`t make it down here. They get picked off in the midwest and never see the southeast. Even common milsurps like enfields and arisakas tend to be a scarcity here. But I know I won't sell it for a long while. I hope I can pass it along to my children in the future since it does have some historical significance. The stock for it is in original condition. Even some of the finish is stll present, mostly on the buttstock. Again sorry about the blurriness. My lighting situation hopefully will get better in days to come.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,393 Posts
I'm impressed! Nothing wrong with it, but a bunch of folks just buy rifles to re-sell. I've got quite a few that maybe I should get rid of, but I pick up rifles that appeal to me. Those Number 5s are really nice carbines.

I do not claim to be an expert on anything, but I learn as I go along. A couple of things that I've learned along the way is that those Number 5s were meant to be shorter range than the longer rifles. With the shorter barrels and various 'lightening cuts' that reduce wieght, it was found that the shot groups tended to 'wander' when the barrels heated up.

Another is that the chamber dimensions on these rifles (as well as most all of the earlier .303s) were purposefully slightly oversize. I've read in many places that the reason for this was to enable slightly dirty ammunition to feed and fire under adverse conditions. That is why I 'neck size' only. I don't like to over-work my brass for no reason.

Your rifle should be a great shooter, and they are short enough and light enough to make decent hunting rifles as-is. There are even no-drill scope mounts available.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The wandering zero myth about it doesn't really see to be happening when I shoot it. Sure the thing kicks like a mule but it's pretty accurate at 150 yards. I just love it way too much to ever sell it you know. It's going to be something I can pass down to my children and allow them to have a piece of history all their own. If I hunt with it, which might be unlikely since I have an enfield for that purpose already, I wouldn't want to put a scope on it at all since it'll take away from the historical value of the gun.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,425 Posts
I love the .303's in pretty much any version. I've tried a few times at getting a jungle carbine at a price I can afford - have an open bid on one right now in fact. I did get a slightly sporterized (in that the forestock was shortened) .303 No 4 Mk 2 for $192.77 including shipping and FFL transfer. I paid for it last week and it should arrive this week (I hope). I'm really looking forward to it. The rifle is in excellent condition and I will post pics of it after I get it home.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,393 Posts
Not too sure about the wandering zero being a myth. I've only had one No.5, and the groups opened up for me when the barrel heated up after 30 or so rounds down range. As far as the scope mount, the one I was talking about replaced the rear sight and didn't require any permanent modifications or drilling. The only .303 I still have is a No1 Mk III made in 1916. The bore is a little frosty, but she still shoots well as I can hold it.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,425 Posts
My understanding with the Jungle Carbines is that wandering zero when the barrel heated up was exactly what the brit soldiers in Burma complained about. They still preferred the carbine over the earlier versions though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
745 Posts
maybe a bit high $ wise,, but if ya like who cares,, have several .303's myself and love to take them out,, recomend slugging the barrel first (on any .303) they tend to run all over the map,have seen from .308 to .319 bore demensions, so if you want it to be accurate size the brass for the gun and (what i did as my #5 is oversize at .317 sent a fired case to RCBS and had a sizeing die made for it, so the brass doesnt get over worked shoot cast bullets sized to the bore, used a 32 calib mold and sized down to fit) mine do better then these old eyes. and have fun shooting it.. thats what they were made for
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top