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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,
I am looking for answers or a theory as to what happened to this round.
I was depriming some .223 brass after a shoot at a public range and came across one shell that had a bullet inside the case. The round is not mine but I was collecting my brass plus some other brass laying nearby.
I cut open the case (out of curiosity) and found a deformed bullet inside.
- The primer had a small dimple from a firing pin (I assume...). But the dimple is not as pronounced as a normal case that has been discharged. The primer has not discharged. In the photos I included a fired shell to compare discoloration and primer dimple.
- The case is not discolored from firing.
- The bullet deformation had to occur within the case but I don’t know how.

Does anyhow know how / what happened to this shell??
 

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In the primer photo,the one on the right is a normally FP mark from a AR...As far as the bullet deformation/destruction inside a non fired case.....one for the collection/screenshot. It will be interesting to see what happened.
 

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The base of the mystery case looks to be a little off kilter in the 3rd photo and I see a little bit of silver when I expand the picture, I think some one cut the base off of a couple of cases put the deformed bullet inside and soldered a base back on to it.

As to why, perhaps as a bet winner, shooter claims he can hit a bullet on the nose when laid on its side at x number of yards with his .22, fires a shot and recovers the "mystery round". "See I drove the slug right up inside the thing, pay up sucker!"
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited by Moderator)
I think someone picked up a fired bullet and stuck it in an empty case!
The deformed bullet is far too large to go thru the neck. No deformation of the neck.

The base of the mystery case looks to be a little off kilter in the 3rd photo and I see a little bit of silver when I expand the picture, I think some one cut the base off of a couple of cases put the deformed bullet inside and soldered a base back on to it.

As to why, perhaps as a bet winner, shooter claims he can hit a bullet on the nose when laid on its side at x number of yards with his .22, fires a shot and recovers the "mystery round". "See I drove the slug right up inside the thing, pay up sucker!"
I didn’t include a good shot of the base but it is not damaged in any way. Looks to be never fired. Photo below.
I appreciate the feedback folks - I am really curious!

In the primer photo,the one on the right is a normally FP mark from a AR...As far as the bullet deformation/destruction inside a non fired case.....one for the collection/screenshot. It will be interesting to see what happened.
I can’t claim a lot of experience but the FP mark on the mystery case/primer is slightly but definitely smaller/shallower than a couple of dozen other fired cases. (Has d to see in the photo). Possibly the primer was a dud but I have not experienced that. I assume an AR can malfunction and not drive the FP at full force?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
A
The base of the mystery case looks to be a little off kilter in the 3rd photo and I see a little bit of silver when I expand the picture, I think some one cut the base off of a couple of cases put the deformed bullet inside and soldered a base back on to it.

As to why, perhaps as a bet winner, shooter claims he can hit a bullet on the nose when laid on its side at x number of yards with his .22, fires a shot and recovers the "mystery round". "See I drove the slug right up inside the thing, pay up sucker!"
Actually your second paragraph may be accurate. The bullet does look like it was struck on the nose and may have a .22 bullet inside? I will have to dissect the bullet to see what I can determine. Hell of a shot to not damage the neck and weird to find it on the firing line of a public range. You would think they would keep it as a trophy. I will try to open up the bullet tomorrow night.
 

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"Curiouser and curiouser"....says Lewis Carrol in "Alice in Wonderland."
 

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Kim, the firing pin mark happens when an AR chambers a round. Inertia causes the pin to put a slight dimple on the primer. I suspect that some how the projectile got pushed in the case and some one did all that damage trying to get it out, gave up and threw it on the ground.
 

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Yeah, that was my thought. Someone used it as a target nose-on and successfully hit it, thus driving the bullet into the case. Curious, was there any powder in there?
 

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A similar thing happened to me the very first time I shot my AR15 I spent 3 years building, had a failure to eject on the first round, and the 2nd round slammed into the still chambered case jamming the bullet down inside the case. Havn't had a failure since I've only put 300 or so rounds through it but still no failures.
 

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That shoulder separation intrigues me. Looks as though it might have been sawn, or perhaps removed using a tubing cutter with a very worn cutting wheel.
 

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Some times when an AR jams it will push the bullet back into the case. If it pushes back far enough the powder will fall out. It happens more on reloads when neck tension is not right or it has a light crimp.
No primer was not fired, check to see if the inside of the brass was blackened from the powder burning. ARs make a dot on the primer when the cycle a round & not fire it, because of the floating firing pin.
 

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I find it hard to believe that the damage to that bullet was done by a jam.
 
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The deformed bullet was never fired. No rifling marks on it. The cartridge was used as a target, bullet nose facing the shooter. The shooters bullet struck the bullet in the case, pushing it back until it deformed the nose.
 

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I’m going to guess that the round was for some reason not fully chambered and stuck. The gun was probably an AR15, so the round was pounded out with a bore cleaning rod which jammed the bull into the case. The third image shows what ever type of rod that was inserted from the muzzle to pound out the stuck cartridge impressed into the lead core of the bullet were a well is apparent. I know some of what I stated is redundant of of other members, but my theory ties in all the separate reply’s.

Just any FYI about AR15’s. If a cartridge case is stuck in an AR, to remove the stuck case by engaging the bolt extractor back onto the case rim, stand the rifle with the muzzle point up, unlatch the charging handle holding it firmly and smack the rifles butt on a hard surface such a wooden bench top or a block of wood set on a hard surface. Most the time this will pull the stuck cartridge case out of the chamber. I should add that inserting any type of rod from the muzzle end of the firearm can damage the rifling. Also. Never, ever do that with a live round stuck in a chamber. The impact of the rod could possibly set off the unfired cartridge and drive the rod back out at a high enough velocity to impale a hand or worse a head, and if not that, at least launch the rod up with it then landing on the top of someone’s head. How do I know this, because I have seen both of these scenarios in the past. This is part of the reason I don’t like shooting at public ranges.
 
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