The Firearms Forum banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I made a Dummy load for my N.E.F .243 to check my c.o.l i had the bullet out as far as i could go, and never made contact with the lands, what's with that? Anyone?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,238 Posts
That isn't unusual. I've had several rifles over the years that no matter how long I seated the bullet, it/they wouldn't touch the lands, even heavy for caliber(long bullets). This gives the bullets a little running start before engaging the rifling. Loads that are on the "hot" side won't develope excessive pressure by having the bullet jammed into the riflling. If the gun gives acceptable accuracy, it isn't going to be a problem.

those who beat their guns into plowshares, will plow for thse who didn't
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,034 Posts
if that gun it will ikelt make little difference.

if you have any autoloader 243.. I'd load to make it's magazine happy and then you can use the ammo in the NEF , already knowing it will digest it fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,034 Posts
The won't should be WILL. Never load a max charge with the bullet in the lands it WILL build excessive pressure.
i think you missread the previous posts.
the discussion so far shows that even with max COAL.. the bullet is nowhere near the rifeling..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,260 Posts
True but you said hot loads jammed into the riflings WON'T build excessive pressure. Hot loads jammed into riflings WILL build excessive pressure. That's all I was clearing up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,034 Posts
True but you said hot loads jammed into the riflings WON'T build excessive pressure. Hot loads jammed into riflings WILL build excessive pressure. That's all I was clearing up.
i'm sorry, and ot trying to be rude.. but you have some bad reading comprehension.

I didn't say ANY of it.. I'm QUOTEING someone else.

and he said it because it CAN'T happen. IE.. the physical makup of that firearmchamber apparently is such that there is more lead than projectile, and you can not physically seat the projectile out far eough in the case to contact the lands.. period.

that pretty much ends the story of the projectile jammed in the lands.

makes it mutually exclusive.. IE.. MOOT point.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,260 Posts
I now see that you didn't say it. Sorry for that. However bad advice is bad advice. I understand that the op's rifle here has a large throat BUT if he has another rifle or someone else who reads this is new to reloading and happens to jam the bullet into the riflings with a hot load because of that comment bad things could happen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,034 Posts
I now see that you didn't say it. Sorry for that. However bad advice is bad advice. I understand that the op's rifle here has a large throat BUT if he has another rifle or someone else who reads this is new to reloading and happens to jam the bullet into the riflings with a hot load because of that comment bad things could happen.
and if ammo was free and plentifull I'd be shooting more.

and if I was rich I'd own more guns.

if

if

that's why i said CONTEXT COUNTS

at this point.. I'm not going to continue on this sub thread with you concerning this specific topic.

have a good one.

soundguy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,066 Posts
Powder Burner:

It is not all the uncommon for the chamber to be so deep that a particular bullet will not reach the rifling when seated all the way out in the case. The shape of the Ogive of the bullet often makes that the case. Some rifles just have a deep chamber for whatever reason from a lazy machinist doing the final chamber reaming to a lawyer infested company that wants to be sure no bullet will ever be seated out far enough in the case to ever contact the rifling.

In general the consensus has been that the closer to the rifling the bullet is in the chamber, the better accuracy and I have subscribed to that theory but it is only theory. Some guns like a run on the rifling to get max accuracy. The only way you know is by extensive testing. While I like to shoot I really don't like to do hours and hours of testing at the range. During load development I start my cartridge OAL a few thousandths off the rifle lands for bolt gun and non-magazine guns. But you may find that a lengthy run for the bullet to the rifling works best on your gun. In your case here you may have no choice, but there are longer 243 bullets or ones with different Ogives that may touch the rifling when seated out in the case. So don't get over confident in what you have and check every combination of bullet you might choose, to be safe. Bullets touching the lands or jambed into the lands MAY cause excessive dangerous pressures. Be safe!


LDBennett
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,260 Posts
Powder burner, to find the COAL of your rifle you can use a cleaning rod or a wood dowel. with a break open gun close it up, run the rod from the muzzle down the barrel until it stops make a mark with a fine point marker on the rod flush with the barrel. Next take a bullet and drop it into the chamber. With light pressure hold the bullet in place. Put the rod back down the muzzle until it contacts the bullet and mark the rod again. Then with a micrometer measure the distance between the two marks and that is the COAL for your rifle.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top