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Discussion Starter #1
I’ve recently inherited quite an ordeal of firearms from my grandfather. One is a 1944 Colt M1911A1 but with a Ithaca slide/barrel, and also this one in the photos that I cannot seem to get much information on. The serial number dates to a 1917 Colt 1911 US Army model. Any insights?
 

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You have a very nice 1911 colt. However it has a one time been refinished which dose effect the value. It appears that the pistol has also been nickel plated ? If so it has lost even a bit more value as a collectable piece.
All in all , it is still a nice pistol .
 

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Put a nice set of wood grips on it and enjoy! The gun was in very nice condition when it was nickeled.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Seems to be in really great condition and I love the look of I, just trying to figure out the nitty gritty details on it.

How would I be able to verify if it’s nickel or bumper chrome finishing? And any idea on approximate value considering it’s still 100 years old?
 

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I think the key is that the pistol has been plated long after it left the factory. That's what reduces the value. A jeweler or experienced gun collector might be able to inspect the gun and determine whether the plating is nickel or chrome.
 

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It doesn't matter if it's nickel or chrome plated. The plating is not original to the gun, nor are the grips.
You have a $600 shooter. If it had the original finish it would be worth over $2000.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I shall attach some nice grips and savor this beauty. Anybody have any takes on this other one I got... it’s a 1944 M1911A1... The interesting part is that it is a Colt serial number with an Ithaca slide and barrel. Seems to be in original condition and good condition also... see pictures
 

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Welcome to TFF, SGT USMC. My old computer doesn't play well with others, so the only image I can retrieve is the chromed 1911A1. It is a nice looking pistol, but as has been pointed out - Collectors love original finish and HATE refinishes (and even more so Chrome or Nickle plate).

That is where you are on that 1911A1. I'm not a fan of either finish myself. A military pistol should be either blue or parkerized - in my humble opinion. I had a 1918 Luger that I bought when I was freshly discharged (then an Army E5) back in 1971. It also had been chromed. Loved the pistol but hated the chrome. In my case the pistol was just chromed - and NOT buffed or sanded.

It is possible to have the chrome 'reverse plated' (removed the same way it was applied). The bad thing is that the original finish is already gone. In my case I just had my Luger reverse plated and reblued for my own personal satisfaction. You can't bring back the lost finish - but you can make it look like it did when it was made. In your case, lots of places do reparkerizing. Isn't all that expensive, either. It won't ever be an 'original, untouched, as-issued' .45 - but it will look like it was supposed to. Just a thought for your consideration. Don't feel too bad about the mixed parts: very few 1911s made it thru life with all of their original parts together, and most saw active duty with mixed parts.
 

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Your Colt/Ithaca looks to be a typical GI rebuild gun. I'm no expert on WW2 .45s, but it appears to be a nice one.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thank you all for the great and vast amounts of information. I’m purchasing some handbooks to learn about these new weapons I’ve obtained. I’ve just started to look into a 1937 S/42 Luger that appears to have made it over from WWII.
 

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The second gun looks very nice. It may or may not be a rebuild. It could be mixed parts. The edges are extremely crisp and it shows no evidence of pitting or wear. The light and dark spots are normal. The dark spots are where the slide was hardened. It takes a good book and some time to nail down a nice 1911-A1 like this one.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I’ve read a lot literature and also spoke with quite a few collectors that said it was common for Colt 1911’s to be mixed with different parts, especially Ithaca, considering they had stopped making 1911’s just prior to my handgun’s manufacture date of 1944.

I wonder what type of value this puppy has to hold
 
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