Need help checking headspace on a straight pull bolt action

Discussion in 'Technical Questions & Information' started by beastybaconman, Feb 22, 2016.

  1. beastybaconman

    beastybaconman Member

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    I have a 1905 MkII Ross sporting rifle that I'm trying to get going, and the last thing I need to do is check the headspace. The reason I'd like to check it is because when I got the gun it didn't have a bolt so I had to get one off ebay. I know checking headspace on a regular bolt action is pretty simple, if the bolt handle goes all the way down then the bolt is fully closed on the gauge, if it only closes part way then it's not fully closed on the gauge. But with a straight pull how do you tell if the bolt is closed on the no-go gauge enough to be out of tolerance? Is it just determined by how far forward the bolt is? Any help would be appreciated.
     
  2. nmckenzie

    nmckenzie Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    Even though it's a straight pull it's still a turning bolt of sorts, except in this case it's just the bolt head that's turning. You should be able to slip a .303 no-go gauge's rim under the extractor's claw and slowly guide it into the chamber. If you remove the firing pin and spring first - thus eliminating perceived resistance as the bolt goes to battery - you should be able to "feel" what the gauge is telling you without exerting much forward pressure on the bolt handle. I have two Ross '05 MkIIs, and this method worked fine with my shop-made no-go gauge - essentially just a steel disc of the proper width and thickness.
     

  3. beastybaconman

    beastybaconman Member

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    Ok I'll try checking it like that. Also what was the thickness of your no-go gauge? I have a Forster go gauge that's .064" and a no-go that's .067", but a guy on another forum was saying the no-go should be a MoD spec gauge that's .074"
     
  4. nmckenzie

    nmckenzie Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    In making my no-go disc I'd worked off dimensions listed in Wikipedia: rim thickness of .064" and width of .540", then added a frog's hair in thickness to create the no-go. Ross bolts are designed to drive people bonkers, so if you find yourself stuck in the disassembly/reassembly processes go to http://www.replicaplans.com/Firearms Maunuals/Rossmanual.pdf. That'll bring up a page-by-page copy of a Ross manual published in 1907.

    p.s. Not sure why the MoD guage would be .074", but bear in mind that WW1 issue - and beyond perhaps - Enfields had chambers purposely cut oversize, first so the rifles would accept hastily manufactured rounds of questionable dimensions, and also due to the mud and grime of the trenches - the latter being just one of the reasons the Ross Model 1910 gained such a dismal reputation when fielded by the Canadian Expeditionary Force. Good luck with your '05, they're really neat rifles.
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2016
  5. nmckenzie

    nmckenzie Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    Don't understand why the full address for the 1907 manual won't print. There's a %20 between the words Firearms and Manuals that won't print on-screen. Grrr.
     
  6. beastybaconman

    beastybaconman Member

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    Thanks for the help I'll just use my .067 no-go gauge. And try this link for that 1907 manual, it's where I always go to look at it: http://www.forgottenweapons.com/wp-content/uploads/manuals/Rossmanual.pdf