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I have had this rifle in my family for many years now and the origins of it are unknown. I included a picture of the rifle itself, the end of the tamping rod, and the ornamentation where the broken hammer was.

The length of the rifle is 48" with a metal cap on the stock. The muzzle interior diameter is 3/4". Stamped on the barrel is the marking, in block lettering, "HALL NEW YORK". I'm somewhat at a loss since when I tried to do some research all I came across was John Hall, who manufactured mainly in Harpers Ferry and Missouri and was known for his breach-loading rifles.

Thanks in advance!
 

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Given the 3/4 inch muzzle measurment, I don't think it is a rifle, but a 12 gauge fowler (early shotgun). Probably 1850-1880 or so, back-action percussion, poured pewter cap. The worm on the end of the ramrod is used to remove stuck patches. It is probably missing a 2nd thimble that would have been attached nearer the muzzle--the thin tube afixed to the bottom of the barrel that the ramrod runs through. You can purchase a replacement hammer and screw from Dixie Gun Works--although you'll have to determine the thread count. If you carefully remove the barrel, you may find proof marks indicating country of origin beneath.

I did a quick Google search for Hall Percussion Shotgun and came up with this rifle listing. However, the value of your's is seriously compromised by the missing hammer and overall condition and by the fact that it is a shotgun and not a rifle:
http://www.icollector.com/Hall-Marked-Percussion-Full-Stock-Rifle_i11704808
 

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You can purchase a replacement hammer and screw from Dixie Gun Works--although you'll have to determine the thread count.
It needs more than a hammer as the photo of lock shows that the tumbler lug for the hammer has been broken off.
 

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Buffalochip noted what the worm is for, but didn't mention that it is on the rod backward. It is easier to see how it works if it is reversed.

Jim
 
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